actinickeratosis

What is actinic keratosis?


If treated early, almost all actinic keratoses can be eliminated before developing into skin cancer. However, if left untreated these spots or patches may progress to squamous cell carcinoma, a serious form of skin cancer.

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actinic keratosis information from trusted sources:

Actinic keratosis

Actinic keratosis is a precancerous growth on the skin.

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Actinic keratosis

An actinic keratosis is a skin lesion that appears as a rough, scaly patch on your face, lips, ears, back of your hands, forearms, scalp and neck. The cause is frequent or intense exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays, typically from the sun.

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Actinic keratosis

Actinic (ac-TIN-ik) keratosis (ker-ah-TO-sis), also called solar keratosis, is a type of precancerous skin disease. Precancerous means that it may lead to cancer. Normally, cells reproduce by splitting in a planned way, making more cells only when needed. With actinic keratosis, abnormal cells are found on the outer layer of skin. They grow and divide without order, often making a lesion (lump or bump that is dry, scaly, or rough). Actinic keratosis is found more often in fair-skinned, light-haired people who have been in the sun a lot.

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Actinic keratosis

Actinic keratoses, also known as solar keratoses, are small rough or scaly areas of skin due to damage from sun exposure. Some actinic keratoses can turn into squamous cell skin cancer, so it is important to perform self-examinations often and catch them early.

Read more on www.visualdxhealth.com

Sunburn

Dermatitis due to excessive exposure to the actinic rays of the sun. Complication of sunburn is sunstroke. Sunstroke is an acute and dangerous reaction to heat exposure.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com

Actinic Keratosis (Keratoses) Symptoms, Signs, Treatment and ...

Mar 19, 2011 ... Learn about actinic keratosis causes (sun exposure), signs, symptoms, treatment and diagnosis. Actinic keratoses are precancerous spots on ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com

Actinic Keratosis

An actinic keratosis is a scaly or crusty bump that forms on the skin surface. They are also known as a solar keratosis and are caused by long term sun ...

Read more on www.aocd.org

The Skin Cancer Foundation - Actinic Keratosis and Other ...

In-depth information from The Skin Cancer Foundation on Actinic keratosis, a precancer, which can be the first step leading to squamous cell carcinoma.

Read more on www.skincancer.org

Actinic keratosis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Actinic keratosis (also called "solar keratosis" and "senile keratosis") is a premalignant condition of thick, scaly, or crusty patches of skin. ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Actinic Keratosis: eMedicine Dermatology

Jul 23, 2010 ... Overview: Actinic keratosis (AK) is a UV light-induced lesion of the skin that may progress to invasive squamous cell carcinoma.

Read more on emedicine.medscape.com

Contents

Causes
Frequent or intense exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays, typically from the sun, causes an actinic keratosis.

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Exams and Tests
The health care provider makes the diagnosis based on the appearance of the skin growth. A skin biopsy may reveal any cancerous changes, if they occur.

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Medical advice
Call for an appointment with your health care provider if areas of persistent roughness or scaliness develop in sun-exposed skin.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
Actinic keratosis itself is benign, but it may develop into skin cancer. If left untreated, approximately 1% of actinic keratoses develop into squamous cell carcinoma.

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Possible Complications
Squamous cell carcinoma Irritation and discomfort of the skin growth

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Preparing for your appointment
You're likely to start by first seeing your family doctor or primary care doctor. However, in some cases when you call to set up an appointment, you may be referred directly to a specialist in skin diseases (dermatologist).

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Prevention
Prevention of actinic keratoses is important because this condition can be precancerous or an early form of skin cancer. Sun safety is necessary to help prevent development and recurrence of patches and lesions caused by an actinic keratosis.

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Risk factors
Although anyone can develop actinic keratoses, you may be more likely to develop the condition if you: Are male; Are over age 40; Live in a sunny climate; Have a history of frequent or intense sun exposure or sunburn; Have pale skin, red or blond hair, and blue or light-colored eyes; Tend to freckle or burn when exposed to sunlight; Have a personal history of an actinic keratosis or skin cancer; Have a weak immune system as a result of chemotherapy, chronic leukemia, AIDS or organ transplant medications

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Symptoms
The signs and symptoms of an actinic keratosis include: Rough, dry or scaly patch of skin, usually less than 1 inch (2.5 centimeters) in diameter Flat to slightly raised patch or bump on the top layer of skin Lesion that may develop a hard, wart-like surface Lesion that ranges in color from pink to red to brown, or flesh-colored Itching or burning in the affected area

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Tests and diagnosis
Your doctor can usually diagnose actinic keratoses by inspecting the skin. If there's any doubt, your doctor may do other tests, such as a skin biopsy. During a skin biopsy, your doctor takes a small sample of your skin (biopsy) for analysis in a lab. A biopsy can usually be done in a doctor's office using a local anesthetic.

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Treatments and drugs
It's impossible to tell exactly which patches or lesions will develop into skin cancer. Therefore, actinic keratoses are usually removed as a precaution. Your doctor can discuss with you which treatment is appropriate for you.

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