addisonsdisease

What is addison's disease?


Your adrenal glands are located just above each of your two kidneys. These glands are part of your endocrine system, and they produce hormones that give instructions to virtually every organ and tissue in your body.

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Also known as Addison Disease, Addisons Disease, adrenal insufficiency, Primary Adrenal Insufficiency, hypocortisolism, chronic adrenal insufficiency, Primary Adrenocortical Insufficiency, adrenocortical hypofunction, chronic adrenocortical insufficiency, Primary Hypoadrenalism, Primary Adrenocortical Insufficiencies, Primary Hypoadrenalisms
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addison's disease information from trusted sources:

Addison's disease

The initial symptoms of Addison's disease, such as tiredness, a lack of energy, and muscle weakness, are similar to the symptoms of many other health conditions, such as depression, chronic fatigue syndrome, or flu.

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Addison's disease

Your adrenal glands are just above your kidneys. The outside layer of these glands makes hormones that help your body respond to stress and regulate your blood pressure and water and salt balance. Addison's disease occurs if the adrenal glands don't make enough of these hormones. A problem with your immune system usually causes Addison's disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks your own tissues, damaging your adrenal glands.

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Addison's disease

Addison's disease is a disorder that results when your body produces insufficient amounts of certain hormones produced by your adrenal glands. In Addison's disease, your adrenal glands produce too little cortisol, and often insufficient levels of aldosterone as well.

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Addison's disease

Addison's disease is an illness caused by the adrenal (uh-dree-null) glands. This illness may also be called adrenal insufficiency. An adrenal gland is found above each kidney. These glands release hormones that are important to your body. Hormones are special chemicals that your body makes. The job of hormones is to control how different parts of your body work. With Addison's disease, the adrenal glands do not make enough cortisone-like hormones. These hormones affect almost every organ and tissue in your body. They have many jobs, such as keeping the fluid balance in your body normal. Other jobs are to monitor your blood pressure and to be involved in how your body uses sugar and protein. The adrenal hormones also monitor the amount of energy you have to do day-to-day activities.

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Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetes mellitus is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness worldwide, and, in the United States, it is the most common cause of blindness in people younger than 65 years of age. In addition to being a leading cause of blindness, diabetic eye disease encompasses a wide range of problems that can affect the eyes.

Gum disease

Any abnormality, inflammatory or degenerative, of the tissue around a tooth. (Periodontal means "located around a tooth") The term refers to any disorder of the gums or other supporting structures of the teeth. Periodontitis is the inflammation or degeneration, or both, of the dental periosteum, alveolar bone, cementum, and adjacent gingiva. Suppuration ususally occurs, supporting bone is resorbed, teeth become loose, and recession of gingivae occurs. Usually follows chronic gingivitis, Vincent's infection, or poor dental hygiene.

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Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison's Disease

Defines primary adrenal insufficiency, also called Addison's disease, and secondary adrenal insufficiency. Explains the functions of the adrenal hormones ...

Addison's disease - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Addison's disease (also chronic adrenal insufficiency, hypocortisolism, and hypocorticism) is a rare, chronic endocrine disorder wherein the adrenal glands ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Addison's Disease Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment on ...

Mar 11, 2011 ... What Are the Symptoms and Signs of Addison's Disease? ... What was the treatment for your Addison's disease? ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com

Understanding Addison's Disease -- the Basics

Dec 13, 2009 ... Get a basic overview of Addison's disease, a rare condition involving the adrenal glands and hormone production.

Read more on www.webmd.com

Contents

Complications
Hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) is a symptom of Addison's disease. It can cause unconsciousness, particularly in children. While you are unconsciousness, your brain will not get enough oxygen which may cause brain damage.

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Coping and support
These steps may help you cope better with a medical emergency if you have Addison's disease: Carry a medical alert card and bracelet at all times. In the event you're incapacitated, emergency medical personnel know what kind of care you need. Keep extra medication handy. Because missing even one day of therapy may be dangerous, it's a good idea to keep a small supply of medication at work, at a vacation home and in your travel bag, in the event you forget to take your pills. Also, have your doctor prescribe a needle, syringe and injectable form of corticosteroids to have with you in case of an emergency. Stay in contact with your doctor. Keep an ongoing relationship with your doctor to make...

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Diagnosis
In diagnosing Addison's disease, your GP may review your medical history and ask about your family to see if there is any history of autoimmune disorders. Your GP will also ask you about your symptoms, and how they impact on your everyday activities - for example, you may have problems carrying heavy bags of shopping, or walking up stairs.

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Exams and Tests
Tests may show:Increased potassium ; Low blood pressure ; Low cortisol level ; Low serum sodium ; Normal sex hormone levels; Abdominal x-ray ; Abdominal CT scan ; 17-hydroxycorticosteroids ; 17-ketosteroids ; 24-hour urinary aldosterone excretion rate; ACTH ; Aldosterone ; Blood eosinophil count; CO2 ; Cortrosyn stimulation test ; Potassium test ; Renin ; Urine cortisol

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Medical advice
See your doctor if you have signs and symptoms that commonly occur in people with Addison's disease. Most people with this condition experience darkening areas of skin (hyperpigmentation), severe fatigue, unintentional weight loss, and gastrointestinal problems, such as nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Dizziness or fainting, salt cravings, and muscle or joint pains also are common.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
With hormone replacement therapy, most people with Addison's disease are able to lead normal lives.

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Possible Complications
Complications can occur if you take too little or too much adrenal hormone supplement.

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Symptoms
Addison's disease symptoms usually develop slowly, often over several months, and may include: Muscle weakness and fatigue; Weight loss and decreased appetite; Darkening of your skin (hyperpigmentation); Low blood pressure, even fainting; Salt craving; Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia); Nausea, diarrhea or vomiting; Muscle or joint pains; Irritability; Depression

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Treatments and drugs
If you receive an early diagnosis of Addison's disease, treatment may involve taking prescription corticosteroids. Because your body isn't producing sufficient steroid hormones, your doctor may have you take one or more hormones to replace the deficiency. Cortisol is replaced using hydrocortisone (Cortef), prednisone or cortisone acetate. Fludrocortisone (Florinef) replaces aldosterone, which controls your body's sodium and potassium needs and keeps your blood pressure normal.

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