aids

What is AIDS?


AIDS is the fifth leading cause of death among people aged 25 - 44 in the United States, down from number one in 1995. About 25 million people worldwide have died from this infection since the start of the epidemic, and in 2006, there were approximately 40 million people around the world living with HIV/AIDS.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Also known as hiv, human immunodeficiency virus, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome, Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome, Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndromes, Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndromes, Acquired Immunologic Deficiency Syndrome, ACQUIRED IMMUNE DEFIC SYNDROME, ACQUIRED IMMUNO DEFIC SYNDROME, IMMUNOL DEFIC SYNDROME ACQUIRED, IMMUNODEFIC SYNDROME ACQUIRED
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AIDS information from trusted sources:

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the most advanced stages of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). HIV is a virus that kills or damages cells of the body's immune system. HIV most often spreads through unprotected sex with an infected person. AIDS may also spread by sharing drug needles or through contact with the blood of an infected person. Women can give it to their babies during pregnancy or childbirth.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

AIDS

The occurrence of immune deficiency in previously healthy individuals. There is no specific therapy.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com

Human immunodeficiency virus

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) suppresses the immune system’s ability to fight infection and disease. HIV was first identified in the early 1980s. The virus targets white blood cells in the immune system known as helper T cells (or CD4 cells), thus impairing the body's ability to fight infections. While much has been learned since HIV was first identified, it is still not entirely clear how the virus destroys CD4 cells or impairs the immune system's ability to fight infection.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

HIV and AIDS

Department Of Health (2004). HIV post-exposure prophylaxis: Guidance from the UK Chief Medical Officer's Expert Advisory Group on AIDS

Read more on www.nhs.uk

HIV/AIDS

AIDS is a chronic, life-threatening condition caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). By damaging your immune system, HIV interferes with your body's ability to fight off viruses, bacteria and fungi that cause disease. HIV makes you more susceptible to certain types of cancers and to infections your body would normally resist, such as pneumonia and meningitis. The virus and the infection itself are known as HIV. "Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)" is the name given to the later stages of an HIV infection.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

HIV/AIDS

HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection has now spread to every country in the world. Approximately 40 million people are currently living with HIV infection, and an estimated 25 million have died from this disease. The scourge of HIV has been particularly devastating in sub-Saharan Africa, but infection rates in other countries remain high. In the United States, approximately 1 million people are currently infected. Here are a few key points about the disease:

AIDS screen

To determine if you are infected with Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

Read more on www.labtestsonline.org

AIDS - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Acquired immune deficiency syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Welcome to AIDS.gov

HIV/AIDS information from the Federal government about prevention, testing, treatment, research, and using new media in response to HIV/AIDS.

Read more on www.aids.gov

CDC HIV/AIDS

CDC provides leadership for HIV prevention research and surveillance and the development and testing of effective biomedical interventions to reduce ...

Read more on www.cdc.gov

Contents

Exams and Tests
The following is a list of AIDS-related infections and cancers that people with AIDS may get as their CD4 count decreases. In the past, having AIDS was defined as having HIV infection and getting one of these additional diseases. Today, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a person may also be diagnosed as having AIDS if they have a CD4 cell count below 200, even if they don't have an opportunistic infection.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Medical advice
Call for an appointment with your health care provider if you have any of the risk factors for HIV infection, or if you develop symptoms of AIDS. By law, AIDS testing must be kept confidential. Your health care provider will review results of your testing with you.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Outlook (Prognosis)
Right now, there is no cure for AIDS. It is always fatal if no treatment is provided. In the US, most patients survive many years after diagnosis because of the availability of HAART. HAART has dramatically increased the amount of time people with HIV remain alive.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Possible Complications
When a person is infected with HIV, the virus slowly begins to destroy that person's immune system. How fast this occurs differs in each individual. Treatment with HAART can help slow or halt the destruction of the immune system.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Prevention
The riskiest sexual behavior is unprotected receptive anal intercourse -- the least risky sexual behavior is receiving oral sex. Performing oral sex on a man is associated with some risk of HIV transmission, but this is less risky than unprotected vaginal intercourse. Female-to-male transmission of the virus is much less likely than male-to-female transmission. Performing oral sex on a woman who does not have her period carries low risk of transmission.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Support Groups
Joining support groups where members share common experiences and problems can often help the emotional stress of devastating illnesses. See AIDS - support group.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Symptoms
The symptoms of AIDS are primarily the result of infections that do not normally develop in individuals with healthy immune systems. These are called opportunistic infections.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Treatment
There is no cure for AIDS at this time. However, a variety of treatments are available that can help keep symptoms at bay and improve the quality of life of those who have already developed symptoms. Antiretroviral therapy suppresses the replication of the HIV virus in the body. A combination of several antiretroviral agents, termed highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), has been highly effective in reducing the number of HIV particles in the blood stream, as measured by the viral load...

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov