aloe

What is Aloe?


The National Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) can be called from anywhere in the United States. This national hotline number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. They will give you further instructions.

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Also known as Aloe vera, kumari, Aloes, lu hui, burn plant, Aloe veras, skin and sunburn treatments
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Aloe

Aloe is an extract from the aloe plant that is used in many skincare products. Aloe poisoning occurs when someone swallows this substance. This is for information only and not for use in the treatment or management of an actual poison exposure. If you have an exposure, you should call your local emergency number (such as 911) or the National Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Aloe

The aloe is a perennial plant, the strong, fibrous root produces a rosette of fleshy basal leaves as in the agave but considerably smaller. The narrow-lanceolate leaves are 1-2 feet long and whitish-green on both sides, and they bear spiny teeth on the margins. The yellow to purplish, drooping flowers, which are evident most of the year, grow in a long raceme at the top of a flower stalk up to 4 1/2 feet high. The fruit is a triangular capsule containing numerous seeds. Other varieties: Bombay aloes (Aloe socotrina), not to be taken during pregnancy, used similarly to aloe vera. Aloe perryi (or Bombay aloe, Turkey aloe, Zanzibar aloe), found on the island of Socotra near the entrance of the Gulf of Aden. This is used like aloe vera, although considered by some to be less powerful. Aloe saponaria, found in South Africa, natives use the leaf pulp and yellow juice for ringworm. Aloe tenuior, found in South Africa, natives use a decoction of the root for tapeworm. Aloe latifolia, found in South Africa, some natives use the leaf pulp to treat inflamed boils (SEE BOILS) and sores, others use the leaf pulp and the plant's yellow juice to cure ringworm.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com

Aloe

Aloe is an herbal medicine used in skin ointments and creams to treat wounds, burns, or other skin problems. It is also used to treat genital herpes which is an infection spread by having sex. Aloe may be used to treat ulcers, nausea (upset stomach), or constipation (hard bowel movements).

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Aloe Vesta 2-N-1 Antifungal

Miconazole belongs to the group of medicines called antifungals. Topical miconazole is used to treat some types of fungus infections.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Aloe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Aloe, also written Aloë, is a genus containing about four hundred species of flowering succulent plants. The most common and well known of these is Aloe ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Aloe Vera [NCCAM Herbs at a Glance]

Jan 4, 2011 ... Basic information on aloe vera, including common names, uses, potential side effects, and resources to learn more.

Read more on nccam.nih.gov

Some Notes on Aloe Vera

Jun 23, 1998 ... Aloe, a popular houseplant, has a long history as a multipurpose folk remedy. Commonly known as Aloe vera, the plant can be separated into ...

Read more on www.quackwatch.com

Aloe Vera

Oct 22, 2006 ... What is Aloe? Latin Names: Aloe barbadensis, Aloe capensis. Other Names: Aloe vera, Cape aloe. Aloe is a plant originally from Africa. ...

Read more on altmedicine.about.com

Aloe

Nov 3, 2008 ... The aloe plant, a member of the lily family, is a common household plant originally from Africa.

Read more on www.cancer.org

Contents

Before Calling Emergency
Determine the following information:Patient's age, weight, and condition; Name of the product (ingredients and strengths, if known); Time it was swallowed; Amount swallowed

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Home Care
Stop using the product.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
How well you do depends on the amount of poison swallowed and how quickly treatment is received. The faster you get medical help, the better the chance for recovery.

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Poisonous Ingredient
Aloe Aloin

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Sources
Aloe is found in many different products, including: Burn medications; Cosmetics; Hand creams

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Symptoms
Breathing difficulty (from breathing in the substance) Diarrhea Loss of vision Rash Severe abdominal pain Skin irritation Throat swelling (which may also cause breathing difficulty) Vomiting

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What to Expect at the Emergency Room
The health care provider will measure and monitor your vital signs, including temperature, pulse, breathing rate, and blood pressure. Symptoms will be treated as appropriate.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov