alopeciaareata

What is alopecia areata?


The cause of alopecia areata is unknown. About a fifth of people with this condition have a family history of alopecia. Alopecia areata may sometimes occur with autoimmune diseases.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
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alopecia areata information from trusted sources:

Alopecia areata

Alopecia areata is a condition that causes round patches of hair loss.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Alopecia areata

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune condition resulting in hair loss. The immune system of the body mistakenly stops hair growth for unknown reasons. Hair loss may be patchy or sparse and may involve the rest of the body in addition to the scalp. Hair in most people spontaneously regrows, though recurrences of the condition are also typical. Genetic and environmental factors play a role in hair loss, the condition may be seasonal as well.

Read more on www.visualdxhealth.com

Hair Loss

Alopecia is loss of hair and sometimes baldness.

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Hair Loss

Your hair loss may have started with a few extra hairs in the sink or in your comb. But now you can't look in the mirror without seeing more of your scalp.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Hair Loss

Hair loss is a common problem that affects millions of men, women, and children. At least half of adultsboth men and womenwill experience some thinning or loss of hair by the time they are 60, and many men will become completely bald. This type of hair loss is different than the loss you experience every day when you shampoo or style your hair. The average person loses about 100 hairs a day. Abnormal hair loss means that you are shedding more than that and, in the case of the most common type of hair loss, the hair will not grow back. If you think your hair loss is excessive, or if you are losing patches of hair, you should see your doctor. He or she will be able to identify the cause and discuss your treatment options.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

National Alopecia Areata Foundation:

The National Alopecia Areata Foundation supports research to find a cure or acceptable treatment for alopecia areata, supports those with the disease, ...

Read more on www.naaf.org

Alopecia areata - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Alopecia areata (AA) is a health condition in which hair is lost from some or all areas of the body, usually from the scalp. Because it causes bald spots on ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Alopecia Areata (Balding) Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis and Hair ...

Mar 18, 2011 ... Read about alopecia areata causes, symptoms (bald spot), diagnosis and hair loss treatment (shampoo). Alopecia areata may be hereditary and ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com

Alopecia Areata

Alopecia areata (AA) causes hair loss in small, round patches that may go away on their own, or may last for many years. Nearly 2% of the U.S. population ...

Read more on www.aad.org

Alopecia Areata: eMedicine Dermatology

Sep 27, 2010 ... Overview: Alopecia areata is a recurrent nonscarring type of hair loss that can affect any hair-bearing area. Clinically, alopecia areata ...

Read more on emedicine.medscape.com

Contents

Exams and Tests
On occasion, a scalp biopsy may be performed. Several blood tests may be done, because alopecia areata may occur with autoimmune conditions.

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Medical advice
Call for an appointment with your health care provider if you are concerned about hair loss.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
Full recovery of hair is common. However, some people may have a poorer outcome, including those with:Alopecia areata at a young age; Eczema (atopic dermatitis); Long-term alopecia

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Possible Complications
Permanent hair loss is a possible complication of alopecia areata.

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Symptoms
Hairs that look like exclamation points are sometimes seen at the edges of a bald patch.

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Treatment
No fully effective treatments are available. Typical therapy includes: Steroid injection under the skin surface, Topical corticosteroids, Ultraviolet light therapy. Irritating drugs may be applied to hairless areas to cause the hair to regrow.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov