amphetamines

What is Amphetamines?


The term club drug refers to a wide variety of dangerous drugs. These drugs are often used by young adults at all-night dance parties, dance clubs and bars. They include Club drugs have become more common in recent years. Sometimes people use them to commit sexual assaults. Club drugs can cause serious health problems and sometimes death. They are even more dangerous if you use them with alcohol.

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Also known as ecstasy, hallucinogens, mdma, ghb, rohypnol, club drugs
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Club Drugs

A wave of new drugs has become increasingly popular with todays adolescents and young adults. These drugs are commonly known as club drugs, a term originating from the rave phenomenon. Raves are all-night dance parties with loud, pounding music and flashing lights stimulating vigorous dancing. History: Initially popular in England in the 1980s, raves are now very popular in the United States. They are often held in inconspicuous places such as warehouses and are frequently announced with short notice. Unique to the rave experience, a stimulatory barragefrequently augmented by mind-altering drugsoverloads the senses. Trends in drug use: The rave phenomenon in the United States has increased the use of several popular drugs. In a recent study of ecstasy (a popular club drug) use in raves, 89% of rave attendees reported using ecstasy at least once, and nearly 50% reported use within the past month. This study also found that current ecstasy users were more likely than nonusers and past users to smoke marijuana and snort powder cocaine within the past 12 months. Emerging recreational drug use: Club drugs have reflected changing trends in the recreational use of drugs in adolescents and young adults. These new drugs are often related to parental compounds of traditional drugs such as amphetamines and LSD. In other cases, they reflect the availability of cheap products creatively made from common items. As new recreational drugs emerge, users must be well informed of their associated risks. Unfortunately, many young drug users are obtaining this critical information from Internet sites that often provide incorrect and misleading information. In order to provide accurate information about commonly abused club drugs, professionally written summaries should be available to caregivers, adolescents, and young adults. Frequency of use: Club drugs are not only popular in raves but are often used in other social settings frequented by adolescents and young adults. In a hearing before the Senate Caucus on International Drug Control, the director of the National Institute of Drug Abuse reported an increase in the use of club drugs, especially ecstasy, among those older than 12 years. Those reporting use of club drugs increased from 5.1 million in 1999 to 6.5 million in 2000. Emergency department visits related to the drug gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), also known as the "date-rape" drug, have also increased dramatically (from 56 cases in 1994 to 4,969 cases in 2000). Importance of education: As the use of these new drugs increases, it becomes increasingly important to educate young people and their parents and guardians about the risks associated with club drug use. Internet sites can be misleading, and some people are using these sites for information. One site (DanceSafe) tries to educate nonaddicted users to the risks of club drugs. It offers free testing of tablets submitted by mail and sells home testing kits to analyze the content of pills. The site even goes so far as to compare the risks of drugs to other activities. It states, for example, that ecstasy and GHB are less risky than giving birth, motor sports, or water sports. Sites like this imply that club drugs are nonaddicting and not significantly risky. This is simply untrue. The medical literature reports that club drugs can be addictive and put users at risk for long-term consequences, including death.

Toxicity, Amphetamine: eMedicine Emergency Medicine

Oct 21, 2009 ... Overview: Amphetamines are a class of compounds increasingly abused in regions of the world such as the western United States, Australasia, ...

Read more on emedicine.medscape.com

amphetamines/methamphetamines: amphetamines/methamphetamines

Apr 6, 2009 ... amphetamine use, amphetamine abuse, amphetamine dependence, amphetamines effects, amphetamines facts; methamphetamines facts; ...

Read more on www.oas.samhsa.gov

Contents

Amphetamine
A single entity amphetamine product combining the neutral sulfate salts of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine, with the dextro isomer of amphetamine saccharate and d, l-amphetamine aspartate.

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Amphetamine intoxication
Amphetamine intoxication describes the state that occurs with the use of amphetamine drugs. Intoxication can easily lead to overdose with severe or deadly poisonous effects. It may lead to: Agitation Coma Death High blood pressure Increased body temperature Irregular heart beats (cardiac arrhythmias) Rapid heart rate (tachycardia) Seizures Stroke

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Amphetamine and Dextroamphetamine
Amphetamine and dextroamphetamine combination belongs to the group of medicines called central nervous system (CNS) stimulants. It is used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy (uncontrollable desire for sleep or sudden attacks of deep sleep) .

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dextroamphetamine saccharate, amphetamine aspartate monohydrate, dextroamphetamine sulfate and amphetamine sulfate
Amphetamines are sympathomimetic amines. A single-entity amphetamine product combining the neutral sulfate salts of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine, with the dextro isomer of amphetamine saccharate and d, l-amphetamine aspartate monohydrate. Dextroamphetamine saccharate, amphetamine aspartate monohydrate, dextroamphetamine sulfate and amphetamine sulfate tablets are indicated for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Narcolepsy.

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dextroamphetamine saccharate, amphetamine aspartate, dextroamphetamine sulfate, and amphetamine sulfate
A single-entity amphetamine product combining the neutral sulfate salts of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine, with the dextro isomer of amphetamine saccharate and d,l-amphetamine aspartate monohydrate. Dextroamphetamine saccharate, amphetamine aspartate, dextroamphetamine sulfate, and amphetamine sulfate tablets are indicated for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Narcolepsy.

Read more on dailymed.nlm.nih.gov
dextroamphetamine saccharate, amphetamine aspartate, dextroamphetamine sulfate, amphetamine sulfate
A single-entity amphetamine product combining the neutral sulfate salts of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine, with the dextro isomer of amphetamine saccharate and d, l-amphetamine aspartate. The structural formulas are as follows:In addition, each tablet contains the following inactive ingredients: Microcrystalline Cellulose NF, Silicon Dioxide NF, Povidone USP, and Stearic Acid NF. Tablets of Mixed Salts of a Single Entity Amphetamine Product are indicated for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Narcolepsy.

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Dextroamphetamine Saccharate, Amphetamine Aspartate, Dextroamphetamine Sulfate and Amphetamine Sulfate
A single entity amphetamine product combining the neutral sulfate salts of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine, with the dextro isomer of amphetamine saccharate and d, l-amphetamine aspartate. .

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Amphetamine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Amphetamine (USAN) or amfetamine (INN) is a psychostimulant drug of the phenethylamine class that is known to produce increased wakefulness and focus in ...

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Adderall (Amphetamine, Dextroamphetamine Mixed Salts) Drug ...
Learn about the prescription medication Adderall (Amphetamine, Dextroamphetamine Mixed Salts), drug uses, dosage, side effects, drug interactions, warnings, ...

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Substituted amphetamine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Substituted amphetamines are a chemical class of stimulants, entactogens, hallucinogens, and other drugs. They feature a phenethylamine core with a methyl ...

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Prescription and Over-the-Counter Medications - InfoFacts - NIDA
Nonmedical use of stimulants is broken up by the type of stimulant used: amphetamines, methamphetamine, or Ritalin. For all three stimulants surveyed, ...

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