angina

What is Angina?


The chest pain that can occur with angina can make doing some normal, daily activities, such as walking, uncomfortable. However, the most dangerous complication to be concerned about with angina is a heart attack.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Also known as angina pectoris
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Angina information from trusted sources:

Angina, chest pain in women

Angina is chest pain or discomfort that occurs when an area of your heart muscle doesn't get enough oxygen-rich blood.

Read more on www.nhlbi.nih.gov

Angina - Texas Heart Institute Heart Information Center

Angina pectoris is a Latin phrase that means "strangling in the chest," but an episode of angina is not a heart attack.

Angina Pectoris- Health Encyclopedia and Reference

Angina Pectoris Symptoms, Treatments and Medications.

Read more on www.healthcentral.com

Angina Pectoris Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, and ...

The discomfort of angina is temporary, meaning a few seconds or minutes, ... An episode of angina is not a heart attack. Having angina means you have an ...

Angina

Angina is chest pain or discomfort you get when your heart muscle does not get enough blood. It may feel like pressure or a squeezing pain in your chest. It may feel like indigestion. You may also feel pain in your shoulders, arms, neck, jaw or back. Angina is a symptom of coronary artery disease (CAD), the most common heart disease. CAD happens when a sticky substance called plaque builds up in the arteries that supply blood to the heart, reducing blood flow.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Angina pectoris - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Angina pectoris, commonly known as angina, is severe chest pain due to ischemia (a lack of blood, hence a lack of oxygen supply) of the heart muscle, ...

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What Is Angina?

Angina literally means choking pain, and angina pectoris refers to a painful or uncomfortable sensation in the chest that occurs when part of the heart does ...

Read more on www.ehealthmd.com

Angina Bullosa Hemorrhagica: eMedicine Dermatology

Apr 29, 2010 ... Overview: Angina bullosa hemorrhagica (ABH) is the term used to describe acute, benign, and generally subepithelial oral mucosal blisters ...

Read more on emedicine.medscape.com

Angina and Heart Disease -- familydoctor.org

Information about heart disease and angina (chest pain) from the American Academy of Family Physicians.

Read more on familydoctor.org

Hardin MD : Angina / Chest Pain

Nov 22, 2010 ... Error processing SSI file Angina / Chest Pain. ... The URL for this page is http ://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/md/angina.html ...

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Contents

Alternative medicine
Two supplements may help improve your angina treatment: L-arginine; L-carnitine

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Causes
Like all the other organs and tissues in your body, your heart needs a constant supply of oxygen-rich blood to function normally.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Diagnosis
Initially, your GP will probably start by asking you about the pattern of your symptoms, such as if you have noticed any particular triggers that could lead to the onset of symptoms.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Lifestyle and home remedies
Because heart disease is often the underlying cause of most forms of angina, you can reduce or prevent angina by working on reducing your heart disease risk factors. Making lifestyle changes is the most important step you can take: If you smoke, stop smoking.; Eat a healthy diet with limited amounts of saturated fat, lots of whole grains, and many fruits and vegetables.; Talk to your doctor about starting a safe exercise plan.; If you're overweight, talk to your doctor about weight-loss options.; Take anti-angina medications as prescribed and follow your doctor's directions closely.; Treat diseases or conditions that can increase your risk of angina, such as diabetes, high blood pressure...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Patient Instructions
Updated by: Larry A. Weinrauch MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Cardiovascular Disease and Clinical Outcomes Research, Watertown, MA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M, Inc.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Preparing for your appointment
If you think you may have recurring angina or are worried about your angina risk because of a strong family history, make an appointment with your family doctor. If angina is found early, your treatment may be easier and more effective. If you're having sudden chest pain (unstable angina), seek emergency medical attention immediately.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Prevention
You can help prevent angina by making the same lifestyle changes that might improve your symptoms if you already have angina. These include: Quitting smoking; Monitoring and controlling other health conditions, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes; Eating a healthy diet; Increasing your physical activity, with your doctor's OK; Maintaining a healthy weight; Reducing your stress level

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Risk factors
The following risk factors increase your risk of coronary artery disease and angina: Smoking tobacco. Smoking and long-term exposure to secondhand smoke damage the interior walls of arteries including arteries to your heart allowing deposits of cholesterol to collect and block blood flow.; Diabetes. Diabetes is the inability of your body to produce or respond to insulin properly. Insulin, a hormone secreted by your pancreas, allows your body to use glucose, which is a form of sugar from foods. Diabetes greatly increases the risk of coronary artery disease, which leads to angina and heart attacks by speeding up atherosclerosis and increasing your cholesterol levels; High blood pressure. Blood...

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Symptoms
The most common symptom of angina is a feeling of pain or discomfort in your chest. The pain can feel tight, dull, or heavy, and usually passes within a few minutes.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Treatment
Treatment for stable angina has three goals...

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