arthroscopy

What is Arthroscopy?


Arthroscopies are carried out using keyhole surgery, where only a small incision (cut) is made in the skin. Therefore, the procedure has the following advantages over ‘traditional', open surgery...

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Also known as Arthroscopic Surgery, Arthroscopies, Arthroscopic Surgeries, Arthroscopic Surgical Procedures, Arthroscopic Surgical Procedure
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Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy (ahr-THROS-skuh-pe) is a procedure for diagnosing and treating joint problems. During arthroscopy, a surgeon examines and, in many cases, repairs your injured or diseased joint with the help of an optical instrument called an arthroscope. An arthroscope consists of a light source, a lens system, and bundled glass or plastic fibers (fiber optics) to carry light to the area being examined. These parts are encased in a tube, usually about one-eighth of an inch (4 mm) in diameter. A video camera attached to the arthroscope relays the view from within your joint to a video monitor. Because the arthroscope is so narrow, your surgeon needs only a small incision to place it in your joint.

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Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy is a method of viewing a joint, and, if needed, to perform surgery on a joint. An arthroscope consists of a tiny tube, a lens, and a light source. See also: Knee arthroscopy Rotator cuff repair Shoulder arthroscopy

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Arthroscopy

An arthroscopy is a form of keyhole surgery that is used to look inside a joint and repair any damage that has occurred.

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Ankle Arthroscopy

Ankle arthroscopy involves the surgical evaluation and treatment of the ankle for a variety of conditions. Arthroscopy involves the use of fiberoptic cameras and very small surgical tools, which work through much smaller incisions than traditional surgery.

Arthroscopy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Arthroscopy (also called arthroscopic surgery) is a minimally invasive surgical procedure in which an examination and sometimes treatment of damage of the ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Arthroscopy - Your Orthopaedic Connection - AAOS

The word arthroscopy comes from two Greek words, "arthro" (joint) and "skopein" (to look). The term literally means "to look within the joint." ...

Read more on orthoinfo.aaos.org

Arthroscopy (Arthroscopic Surgery) Facts, Post Op Complications ...

Mar 9, 2011 ... Read about arthroscopy, a procedure with few complications that uses a tube-like device to examine, diagnose and treat a joint (knee, hip, ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com

Arthroscopy - Arthroscopic Surgery

Arthroscopic surgery can help diagnose and treat common knee, shoulder, and other joint problems. Arthroscopic surgery is useful in treating cartilage ...

Read more on orthopedics.about.com

ARTHROSCOPY

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Contents

Considerations
The diagnostic accuracy of an arthroscopy is about 98%, although x-rays and sometimes MRI scans are taken first because they are noninvasive.

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How it is performed
Before having an arthroscopy, you will usually be given an appointment to attend a pre-admission clinic. During your appointment your general fitness will be assessed to ensure that surgery is suitable at the current time.

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How the Test is Performed
This procedure is typically performed on the knee, shoulder, elbow, or wrist. The type of anesthesia depends on the particular joint and other factors. A regional anesthetic numbs the affected area, but the patient may remain awake, depending on whether other medications are used. For more extensive surgery, general anesthesia may be used. In this case the patient is asleep and pain-free.

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How the Test Will Feel
You may feel a slight sting when the local anesthetic is injected. After this medicine starts to work, you should feel no pain.

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How to Prepare for the Test
You should not eat or drink anything for 12 hours before the procedure. You may be told to shave your joint area. You may be given a sedative before leaving for the hospital.

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How you prepare
Exact preparations depend on which of your joints the surgeon is examining or repairing. In general, you should: Tell your surgeon about all the medications you're taking, including over-the-counter drugs and dietary supplements. Find out which of your regular medications to discontinue before your procedure and how many days in advance to stop them. Stop eating and drink only clear liquids at least six hours before the procedure. Arrange for a ride home after the procedure. Wear loose, comfortable clothing baggy gym shorts, for example, if you're having knee arthroscopy so you can dress easily after the procedure.

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Indications
Your doctor may order this test if you have:A need for joint surgery; Damaged meniscus (the piece of cartilage that cushions the knee joint area); Joint pain from an injury; Joint disease; Lesions or other problems detected by x-rays ; Signs of bone fragments from a fracture; Signs of a torn ligament; Unexplainable joint pain

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Recovery
Once the arthroscopy has been completed you will be transferred to a recovery room where you will be given time to recover from the effects of the anaesthetic.

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Results
Your surgeon will review the findings of the arthroscopy with you as soon as possible. You may also receive a written report, as may your primary physician.

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Risks
Joint stiffness Increased pain Infection (fever) Inflammation Swelling

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Uses
In order to gain a better understanding of the potential uses of arthroscopy, it is helpful to learn about the function and structure of joints.

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What Abnormal Results Mean
Abnormal results may be due to:Bleeding; Bone fragments ; Damaged meniscus cartilage; Dislocation ; Lesions; Rotator cuff tendinitis ; Torn ligaments

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What you can expect
Although the experience varies depending on why you're having the procedure and on which joint is involved, some aspects of arthroscopy are fairly standard.

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Why it's done
Doctors use arthroscopy to help diagnose and treat a variety of joint conditions most commonly those affecting the knee, shoulder, elbow, ankle, hip and wrist in people of all ages.

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