athletesfoot

What is athlete's foot?


A group of mold-like fungi called dermatophytes causes athlete's foot. These organisms sprout tendril-like microscopic extensions that infect the superficial layer of the skin. In response to this fungal growth, the basal layer of the skin produces more skin cells than usual. As these cells push to the surface, the skin becomes thick and scaly. Most often, the more the fungi spread, the more scales your skin produces, causing the ring of advancing infection to form.

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athlete's foot information from trusted sources:

Athlete's Foot

Athlete's foot is a very common condition, which affects many people at some point during their lives. It is caused by a fungal infection, which affects the skin on your feet. The infection is normally mild and is easy to treat. Athlete's foot usually affects the skin in between your toes, causing it to be red, flaky and itchy.

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Athlete's Foot

Athlete's foot is an infection of the feet caused by fungus. The medical term is tinea pedis. Athlete's foot may last for a short or long time and may come back after treatment.

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Athlete's Foot

Athlete's foot is a fungal infection that develops in the moist areas between your toes and sometimes on other parts of your foot. Athlete's foot usually causes itching, stinging and burning.

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Tinea pedis

Tinea (TIN-ee-ah) pedis is also called athlete's foot. It is a skin infection (in-FEK-shun) of the bottom of the foot and between the toes. It can spread to other areas of the body, such as the toenails. The infection is usually gone in three weeks with treatment. It may take one to three months before it is completely gone. You may get athlete's foot more than once.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Athlete's Foot

Athlete's foot (tinea pedis), also known as ringworm of the foot, is a surface (superficial) fungal infection of the skin of the foot. The most common fungal disease in humans, athlete's foot, may be passed to humans by direct contact with infected people, infected animals, contaminated objects (such as towels or locker room floors), or the soil.

Read more on www.visualdxhealth.com

Athlete's Foot

Athlete's foot is a superficial skin infection of the foot caused by a moldlike fungus.

Athlete's Foot

A fungus infection of the foot caused by various dermatophytes, especially Trichophyton rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, and Epidermophyton floccosum, which invade the "dead" outer layers of the skin.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com

Athlete's foot - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Athlete's foot (also known as ringworm of the foot and tinea pedis, and also Hong Kong foot (simplified Chinese: 香港脚; traditional Chinese: 香港腳) in the ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Athlete's Foot Medication, Symptoms, Treatment, Home Remedy and ...

Mar 18, 2011 ... Symptoms of athlete's foot include dry skin, itching, burning, and redness of the feet. The symptoms are often apparent in the skin between ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com

Athlete's Foot-Topic Overview

Jul 2, 2008 ... Athlete's foot (tinea pedis) is a fungal infection that causes a rash on the skin of the foot. It is the most common fungal skin infection.

Read more on www.webmd.com

Contents

Complications
Athlete's foot is normally a mild infection which rarely causes any complications. It also tends to be quick and easy to treat. However, it is always best to ensure that you use the appropriate treatment for athlete's foot as soon as you begin to develop symptoms. This will help minimise the risk of you developing complications.

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Diagnosis
Athlete's foot is normally a very mild infection, which you can usually diagnose and treat yourself.

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Exams and Tests
The diagnosis is based primarily on the appearance of your skin. If tests are performed, they may include:Skin culture (fungi from flecks of skin are able to grow in the lab); Skin lesion biopsy (examination may show fungus under the microscope); Skin lesion KOH exam (skin scrapings in KOH show fungus under the microscope)

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Lifestyle and home remedies
For a mild case of athlete's foot, you can apply an over-the-counter antifungal cream, spray, powder or ointment. Most fungal infections respond well to these topical agents, which include: Clotrimazole (Lotrimin AF, Mycelex); Miconazole (Micatin); Terbinafine (Lamisil AT); Tolnaftate (Tinactin)

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Medical advice
Call your doctor right away if:Your foot is swollen and warm to the touch, especially if there are red streaks. These are signs of a possible bacterial infection. Other signs include pus or other discharge and fever. ; You have diabetes and develop athlete's foot.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
Athlete's foot infections range from mild to severe and may last a short or long time. They may persist or recur, but they generally respond well to treatment. Long-term medication and preventive measures may be needed.

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Possible Complications
Recurrence of athlete's foot Secondary bacterial skin infections such as cellulitis Lymphangitis, lymphadenitis Systemic side effects of medications (see the specific medication)

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Preparing for your appointment
Your family doctor or a skin specialist (dermatologist) can diagnose athlete's foot. Because appointments can be brief and there's often a lot of ground to cover, it can help to be well prepared. Here are some tips to help you get ready for your appointment and what to expect from your doctor.

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Prevention
These tips can help you avoid athlete's foot or ease the symptoms if infection occurs: Keep your feet dry, especially between your toes. Go barefoot to let your feet air out as much as possible when you're home. Go with natural materials. Wear socks that are made of natural material, such as cotton or wool, or a synthetic fiber designed to draw moisture away from your feet. Change socks and stockings regularly. If your feet sweat a lot, change your socks twice a day. Wear light, well-ventilated shoes. Avoid shoes made of synthetic material, such as vinyl or rubber. Alternate pairs of shoes. This allows time for your shoes to dry. Protect your feet in public places. Wear waterproof sandals...

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Risk factors
You are at higher risk of athlete's foot if you: Are a man; Frequently wear damp socks or tightfitting shoes; Share mats, rugs, bed linens, clothes or shoes with someone who has a fungal infection; Frequently visit public areas where the infection can spread, such as locker rooms, saunas, swimming pools, communal baths and showers; Have a weakened immune system

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Symptoms
The signs and symptoms of athlete's foot can be numerous, although you probably won't have all of them: Itching, stinging and burning between your toes; Itching, stinging and burning on the soles of your feet; Itchy blisters; Cracking and peeling skin, especially between your toes and on the soles of your feet; Excessive dryness of the skin on the bottoms or sides of the feet; Toenails that are thick, crumbly, ragged, discolored or pulling away from the nail bed

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Treatments and drugs
If athlete's foot is severe or doesn't respond to over-the-counter medicine, you may need a prescription-strength topical medication (lotion, powder, spray or ointment) or an oral medication (pill, capsule or tablet). Many options are available, including: Terbinafine (Lamisil); Clotrimazole (Lotrimin); Miconazole (Monistat-Derm)

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com