baldness

What is baldness?


More than half of men and women in the United States experience hair loss. About 30% of people have hair loss by age 30 years, and about 50% have hair loss by age 50 years. Hair loss is so common that most of the time it is considered a normal variation and not a disease. Other animals closely related to humans, such as the chimpanzee, also lose their hair. Forms of hair loss Androgenic alopecia - The most common type of hair loss, also called male pattern baldness Traumatic alopecia - Hair loss from hair being torn out Drug-induced alopecia - Hair loss caused by one of many medications Alopecia areata - Patchy, usually reversible, hair loss Hair loss varies widely with race. Japanese men develop baldness less commonly than whites do. On average they also develop balding about 10 years later. Blacks are 4 times less likely to have abnormal hair loss than are whites. Women develop hair loss as frequently as men do, but because of hormonal differences women don't lose as much hair volume. Differences in hair styling allow women to hide hair loss more effectively than men. A woman may not notice hair loss itself but may notice that her ponytail or braid is getting thinner. Women also have a different pattern of balding than men. Hair loss has few medical complications, but several serious conditions can cause it. In addition, there are some psychological effects associated with going bald. People with hair loss may sometimes be more likely to have a negative body image than those without hair loss. There are 3 cycles of hair growth-growing, resting, and shedding. In most animals these cycles change with the season, and all hairs are in the same part of the cycle at the same time. This is why animals grow a thicker coat in the fall and shed most in the spring. Unlike most animals, in humans each hair has its own pattern of growing, resting, and shedding. Each person sheds hair and regrows hair every day. When this balance is disturbed and more hairs are shed than are regrown, alopecia or hair loss results.

Read more on www.emedicinehealth.com
Also known as hair loss, Alopecia, loss of hair, Androgenetic Alopecia, Male Pattern Baldness, Pseudopelade, Male Pattern Alopecia
Search for any health
topic on HealthMash:

Explore and Discover

Drugs and Substances
» thyroid
Alternative Medicine
» burdock
» biotin
» aloe
» garlic

baldness information from trusted sources:

Hair Loss

Your hair loss may have started with a few extra hairs in the sink or in your comb. But now you can't look in the mirror without seeing more of your scalp.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Alopecia

Alopecia is loss of hair and sometimes baldness.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Hair Loss

Hair loss is a common problem that affects millions of men, women, and children. At least half of adultsboth men and womenwill experience some thinning or loss of hair by the time they are 60, and many men will become completely bald. This type of hair loss is different than the loss you experience every day when you shampoo or style your hair. The average person loses about 100 hairs a day. Abnormal hair loss means that you are shedding more than that and, in the case of the most common type of hair loss, the hair will not grow back. If you think your hair loss is excessive, or if you are losing patches of hair, you should see your doctor. He or she will be able to identify the cause and discuss your treatment options.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Hair Loss

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune condition resulting in hair loss. The immune system of the body mistakenly stops hair growth for unknown reasons. Hair loss may be patchy or sparse and may involve the rest of the body in addition to the scalp. Hair in most people spontaneously regrows, though recurrences of the condition are also typical. Genetic and environmental factors play a role in hair loss, the condition may be seasonal as well.

Read more on www.visualdxhealth.com

Male Pattern Baldness

Aug 26, 2006 ... A review of male pattern baldness. Why it occurs and what can be done to treat it.

Read more on menshealth.about.com

Survey: Most Baldness Treatments Don't Work

Apr 6, 2010 ... Most baldness cures just don't cut it, according to a new Consumer Reports magazine survey of more than 8000 men and women who have personal ...

Read more on www.webmd.com

Steroid 5-alpha reductase

It is thought that disturbances in 5-alpha reductase activity in skin cells might contribute to male pattern baldness, acne or hirsutism. ...

Read more on www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Baldness (Alopecia)

Baldness, also known as alopecia, is hair loss, or absence of hair. Baldness is usually most noticeable on the scalp, but can occur anywhere on the body ...

Read more on medicalcenter.osu.edu

What Causes Hair Loss? 9 Myths About Baldness - US News and World ...

Feb 22, 2011 ... Recent research suggests that the most common type of hair loss, male pattern baldness, can be triggered by faulty hair-making progenitor ...

Read more on health.usnews.com

Contents

Alopecia
Did you know that you lose up to 100 hairs from your scalp every day That's normal, and in most people, those hairs grow back. But many men -- and some women -- lose hair as they grow older. You can also lose your hair if you have certain diseases, such as thyroid problems, diabetes or lupus. If you take certain medicines or have chemotherapy for cancer, you may also lose your hair. Other causes are stress, a low protein diet, a family history or poor nutrition. Treatment for hair loss depends on the cause. In some cases, treating the underlying cause will correct the problem. Other treatments include medicines and hair restoration.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Hair Loss
Partial or complete loss of hair is called alopecia.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Alopecia, Male Pattern
Male pattern baldness (alopecia), or androgenetic alopecia, is the patterned balding of a man. Although the condition may affect both the appearance and self-esteem of some men, one should note that the condition is not a medical disorder. The hair loss is non-scarring and has a genetic basis. Sex steroids (androgens) &#8211, specifically, dihydrotestosterone &#8211, play a role in this form of balding.

Read more on www.visualdxhealth.com
Female pattern baldness
Female pattern baldness involves a typical pattern of loss of hair in women, caused by hormones, aging, and genes.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Male Pattern Baldness
Male pattern baldness is the most common type of hair loss in men. It usually follows a typical pattern of receding hairline and hair thinning on the crown, and is caused by hormones and genetic predisposition.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Hair Loss, Female Pattern Baldness
Female pattern baldness (alopecia) is a form of hair loss affecting women due to an inherited susceptibility. It is most commonly noticed after menopause, although it may begin earlier.

Read more on www.visualdxhealth.com
Baldness - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Baldness is the state of having no hair or lacking hair where it often grows, especially on the head. The most common form of baldness involves progressive ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org
Hair Loss Prevention, Baldness Causes, Treatment and Medications ...
Mar 13, 2011 ... What is androgenetic alopecia ("male-pattern baldness," "female-pattern .... This type of hair loss is different than male-pattern baldness, ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com
Management of baldness - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Baldness treatments are estimated to be a US $1 billion per year industry. Slightly less than half of men experience male pattern baldness (MPB) by age 50, ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org
Hair Loss and Its Causes -- familydoctor.org
"Common baldness" usually means male-pattern baldness, or permanent-pattern baldness. It is also called androgenetic alopecia. Male-pattern baldness is the ...

Read more on familydoctor.org
Baldness definition - Medical Dictionary definitions of popular ...
Mar 11, 2011 ... Baldness: Medically known as alopecia. There are many types of baldness, each with a different cause. Baldness may be localized to the front ...

Read more on www.medterms.com