birthcontrolbarriermethods

What is birth control barrier methods?


The practice of birth control or preventing pregnancy is as old as human existence. For centuries, humans have relied upon their imagination to avoid pregnancy. Ancient writings dating back to 1850 BC refer to techniques using a device placed in a womans vagina made of crocodile dung and fermented dough, which most likely created a hostile environment for sperm. Other items placed in the vagina included plugs of gum, honey, and acacia. During the early second century in Rome, a highly acidic concoction of fruits, nuts, and wool was placed on the cervix as a type of spermicidal barrier. Todays barrier methods include the male condom, which is inexpensive, available everywhere, and effective when used properly. The female condom is used less often. Women often elect, instead, to use a diaphragm or cervical cap. Both require a doctors visit.

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Vasectomy

Vasectomy is a simple surgery that provides birth control for men. A vasectomy prevents you from getting your partner pregnant by cutting and sealing the tubes that carry sperm into your semen. The surgery is straightforward and has a low risk of problems. For most men, a vasectomy doesn't cause any noticeable side effects. Before getting a vasectomy, you need to be sure you don't want to father a child in the future. Surgery to reverse a vasectomy is complicated and doesn't always restore fertility.

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Vasectomy

A vasectomy is surgery to cut the vas deferens, the tubes that carry a man's sperm from his scrotum to his urethra. The urethra is the tube that carries sperm and urine out of the penis. After a vasectomy, sperm cannot move out of the testes. A man who has had a successful vasectomy cannot make a woman pregnant.

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Barrier Methods of Birth Control by MedicineNet.com

Mar 19, 2011 ... Information about the different barrier methods of birth control including: spermicides, male condom, female condom, contraceptive sponge, ...

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Barrier methods of birth control

May 22, 2008 ... Barrier methods of birth control block sperm from entering the uterus. Using a spermicide with a barrier method gives you the best possible ...

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Birth Control Options -- familydoctor.org

To prevent pregnancy, the couple must use a barrier method of birth control or not have intercourse during those days. There are a number of ways to keep ...

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Barrier methods of birth control

Mar 27, 2008 ... Barrier methods of birth control physically block or otherwise prevent sperm from entering the uterus and reaching the egg for fertilization ...

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Barrier Methods of Birth Control - Treatment Overview, Risks ...

May 13, 2010 ... A diaphragm may be used for birth control during a menstrual period and can contain the menstrual blood as long as it is not left in for ...

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Barrier Birth Control - Contraception (Birth Control) - Women's ...

Nov 8, 2010 ... Barrier methods for birth control include condoms, female condoms, spermicide, ... Information about Barrier Methods of Birth Control ...

ACOG Education Pamphlet AP022 -- Barrier Methods of Contraception

Barrier methods are some of the oldest and safest forms of contraception (birth control). These methods work by acting as barriers to keep the man's sperm ...

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Birth control - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Other birth control methods mentioned in the papyrus include the application of gummy .... Barrier methods such as the condom have been around much longer, ...

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Contents

Birth Control Behavioral Methods
The practice of birth control or preventing pregnancy is as old as human existence. For centuries, humans have relied upon their imagination to avoid pregnancy. With no method of birth control during sexual intercourse, a woman of childbearing age with normal fertility has an 85% chance of becoming pregnant in 1 year. Behavioral methods that dont use hormones such as birth control pills or mechanical devices such as condoms are in use throughout the world, especially in underdeveloped nations. They often have high failure rates, meaning they dont work effectively and women become pregnant.

Family planning
Contraception is the use of hormones, devices or surgery to prevent a woman from becoming pregnant. It allows women to choose when and if they want to have a baby.

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Vasectomy
Vasectomy is a procedure in which the two tubes that carry sperm from the testicles to the urinary tract are surgically altered so sperm cannot pass through and be released to fertilize a woman's egg during sexual intercourse. For couples who have made the decision not to have any further children, vasectomy is the safest and easiest form of surgical sterilization. While reversible in many cases, vasectomy should be considered a permanent form of birth control. Vasectomy has grown in popularity throughout the world since its inception in the 19th century. About 600,000 men each year choose to undergo a vasectomy in the United States alone. Of those procedures, 85% of vasectomies are performed by urologists (specialists in men's health), and 15% are performed by family practitioners. The cost ranges from $300 to $1,000 and is frequently covered by insurance plans.

Birth Control Hormonal Methods
"The pill" was introduced in the United States in 1962 and signaled a new era for women and their ability to control their fertility.

Birth Control Permanent Methods
Sterilization is considered a permanent method of >birth control that a man or woman chooses. Although sterilization, or a tubal ligation, for women and vasectomy for men can sometimes be reversed, the surgery is much more complicated than the original procedure and may not be successful. Thus, when choosing a sterilization method you should not have thoughts of future reversal.

Female condoms
The female condom, like the male condom, is a barrier device used for birth control.

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Lactational amenorrhea method
Lactational amenorrhea refers to the normal cessation of menstrual periods for the first few months a woman is exclusively breast-feeding. During this time, ovulation doesn't occur and so birth control is essentially automatic. The method is only effective in preventing pregnancy under the following conditions: The mother is exclusively breast-feeding., The baby is less than 6 months old., The mother's period hasn't yet returned.

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rhythm method
Tracking your menstrual history doesn't require special preparation. However, if you want to use the rhythm method for birth control, consult your health care provider first if: You recently had your first period, gave birth, or stopped taking birth control pills or other hormonal contraceptives, You're breast-feeding, You're approaching menopause

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Barrier Methods of Contraception
A woman's reproductive system includes the ovaries, fallopian tubes, uterus, cervix, and vagina. The ovaries are two egg-shaped organs that make egg cells, and are found on the ends of fallopian tubes. The fallopian tubes are two hollow tubes on each side of the upper part of the uterus. These are passages for the egg cells from the ovaries to the uterus. The uterus, or womb, is the pear-shaped organ in your abdomen (stomach) where your baby grows during pregnancy. The cervix is the opening where sperm goes in at the bottom of the uterus. The vagina is a passageway that receives the male's penis.

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Birth Control FAQs
Is birth control right for me If you are of childbearing age, you may consider using a form of birth control to prevent becoming pregnant. The practice of preventing pregnancy is as old as human existence. For centuries, humans have attempted to avoid pregnancy at certain times of their lives to accommodate their careers, marital situations, and preferences. Today, the voluntary control of fertility is of paramount importance to modern society. From a global perspective, countries currently face the crisis of rapid growth of the human population that has begun to threaten human survival.

Birth Control Barrier Methods, Effectiveness, Use, and Types - on ...
Birth control via barrier methods include the diaphragm, vaginal sponge, cervical cap, spermicides, and more. Side effects and pregnancy prevention ...