bonedensity

What is bone density?


A bone density test also called densitometry or DXA scan determines whether you have osteoporosis or are at risk of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to become more fragile and more likely to break.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Also known as Bone Mineral Density, Bone Mineral Content, bone mineral density test, Bone Densities, Bone Mineral Densities, Bone Mineral Contents
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Bone Mineral Density Tests

Osteoporosis (or porous bone) is a disease in which bones become weak and are more likely to break. Without prevention or treatment, osteoporosis can progress without pain or symptoms until a bone breaks (fractures). Fractures commonly occur in the hip, spine, and wrist.Osteoporosis is the underlying cause of more than 1.5 million fractures annually (300,000 hip fractures, approximately 700,000 vertebral fractures, 250,000 wrist fractures, and more than 300,000 fractures in other areas). The estimated national cost (hospitals and nursing homes) for osteoporosis and related injuries is $14 billion each year in the United States. Osteoporosis is not just an old womans disease. Although it is more common in white or Asian women older than 50 years, osteoporosis can occur in almost any person at any age. In fact, more than 2 million American men have osteoporosis, and in women, bone loss can begin as early as age 25 years. Building strong bones and reaching peak bone density (maximum strength and solidness), especially before the age of 30, can be the best defense against developing osteoporosis. Also, a healthy lifestyle can keep bones strong, especially for people older than 30 years.

Bone density - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bone density (or bone mineral density) is a medical term referring to the amount of matter per square centimeter of bones. Bone density (or BMD) is used in ...

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Bone densitometry

Several methods are available to measure bone density, but currently the most widely used technique is DEXA (Dual Energy Xray Absorptiometry). ...

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Bone Density Scan (DEXA), Osteoporosis Screening & Interpretation ...

Mar 12, 2011 ... Bone density testing is used to assess the strength of the bones and ... The central bone density device is used in hospitals and medical ...

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Bone Mass Measurement: What the Numbers Mean

Jump to Who Should Get a Bone Density Test?‎: In addition, a panel convened by the National Institutes of Health in 2000 recommended that bone density ...

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Bone Densitometry

Current and accurate information for patients about Bone Densitometry. Learn what you might experience, how to prepare for the exam, benefits, ...

Read more on www.radiologyinfo.org

Bone Mineral Density

Sep 23, 2008 ... A bone mineral density (BMD) test measures the mineral density (such as calcium) in your bones using a special X-ray, computed tomography ...

Read more on www.webmd.com

Bone density definition - Medical Dictionary definitions of ...

Mar 12, 2011 ... Online Medical Dictionary and glossary with medical definitions.

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Bone Density Test - Osteoporosis

A bone density test, or DEXA scan, is used to determine if a patient has osteoporosis. If you are at risk for osteoporosis, then a bone density test may be ...

Read more on orthopedics.about.com

Welcome to ISCD

Feb 10, 2011 ... The International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) is a multidisciplinary, nonprofit organization that provides a central resource ...

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Contents

Bone mineral density test
A bone mineral density (BMD) test can help your health care provider confirm a diagnosis of osteoporosis. The test can help in several ways: BMD testing is one of the most accurate ways to assess your bone health. When repeated over time, it can be used to monitor your rate of bone loss. It can detect osteoporosis at its earliest stage, so treatment can begin sooner. If you are being treated for osteoporosis, BMD testing can help your health care provider monitor your response to the treatment.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Callus
A callus (tyloma) is a thickening of the skin that occurs in response to excessive, repeated shear or friction forces, commonly due to constant rubbing of the skin. Calluses are similar to corns, but calluses occur when abnormal forces are exerted over a larger area. Certain deformities of the feet, such as crookedness of the toes, may predispose to the development of calluses. Calluses may cause pain, typically a burning sensation. Excessive weight bearing and certain types of shoes are often contributing factors.

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Newborn head molding
The bones of a newborn baby's skull are soft and pliable with gaps between the plates of bone. These gaps close as the bones grow and the brain reaches its full size.

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Bone spurs
Bone spurs, also called osteophytes, are bony projections that develop along the edges of bones. The bone spurs themselves aren't painful, but they can rub against nearby nerves and bones and cause pain.

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Bone scan
A bone scan is a nuclear imaging test that helps diagnose and track several types of bone disease. Your doctor may order a bone scan if you have unexplained skeletal pain suggesting bone loss, bone infection or a bone injury undetectable on a standard X-ray.

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Bone cyst
The most common complication caused by a bone cyst is a fracture. Bone cysts can get bigger ('active cysts'), particularly in children whose bones are still growing, so it is possible for the cyst to cause some damage to the bone.

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Osteoporosis
Osteoporosis makes your bones weak and more likely to break. Anyone can develop osteoporosis, but it is common in older women. As many as half of all women and a quarter of men older than 50 will break a bone due to osteoporosis. Risk factors include

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Bone Diseases
Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly throughout your life. During childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about age 20, you can lose bone faster than you make bone. To have strong bones when you are young, and to prevent bone loss when you are older, you need to get enough calcium, vitamin D and exercise. There are many kinds of bone problems:

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Osteopathy
Osteopathy was developed in the late 1800's by Dr. Andrew Still. He developed osteopathy based on the belief that displaced bones, nerves, and muscles are the cause of most health problems. A doctor of osteopathy (DO) is called an osteopath and believes that when the body's structure is corrected, its function will also improve.

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Bone graft
A bone graft is surgery to place new bone into spaces around a broken bone or bone defects.

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Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol
To determine risk of developing heart disease

Read more on www.labtestsonline.org