bonemarrowtransplant

What is bone marrow transplant?


Bone marrow transplant patients usually go to medical centers, or hospitals, that specialize in this treatment. Most times the patient will stay in a bone marrow transplant unit in the center to limit their chance of getting an infection.

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Stem cell transplant

Bone marrow is a spongy material that is found inside our bones. It is important as it produces special cells known as stem cells.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Bone marrow transplant

A bone marrow transplant delivers healthy bone marrow stem cells into the patient. It replaces bone marrow that is either not working properly or has been destroyed (ablated) by chemotherapy or radiation.

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Stem cell transplant

A stem cell transplant is the infusion of healthy stem cells into your body. A stem cell transplant may be necessary if your bone marrow stops working and doesn't produce enough healthy stem cells. A stem cell transplant can help your body make enough healthy white blood cells, red blood cells or platelets, and reduce your risk of life-threatening infections, anemia and bleeding.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy

To evaluate the type, quantity, and maturity levels of the blood cells present in the marrow, to evaluate the fibrous structure of the marrow, and sometimes to collect a sample of marrow for more specific testing

Read more on www.labtestsonline.org

Bone Marrow Biopsy

Bone marrow is the spongy material found in the center of most large bones in the body. The different cells that make up blood are made in the bone marrow. Bone marrow produces red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Along with a biopsy (the sampling of mostly solid tissue or bone), an aspiration (the sampling of mostly liquid) is often done at the same time. Why the procedure is performed: A bone marrow aspiration and biopsy procedure is done for many reasons. The test allows the doctor to evaluate your bone marrow function. It may aid in the diagnosis of low numbers of red blood cells (anemia), low numbers of white blood cells (leukopenia), or low numbers of platelets (thrombocytopenia), or a high number of these types of blood cells. The doctor can also determine the cause of some infections, diagnose tumors, determine how far a disease, such as lymphoma, has progressed, and evaluate the effectiveness of chemotherapy or other bone marrow active drugs. Where the procedure is performed: Bone marrow aspirations and biopsies can be performed in doctor's offices, outpatient clinics, and hospitals. The procedure itself takes 10-20 minutes.

Bone Marrow Failure in Children

Bone marrow failure happens when your child's bone marrow does not produce blood cells. Bone marrow is the spongy red tissue inside your child's bones. It makes red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Red blood cells carry oxygen to organs and tissues of your child's body. White blood cells help your child's body fight infection by attacking and killing germs. Platelets stop the bleeding when your child is cut or injured.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation - Wikipedia, the free ...

The first physician to perform a successful human bone marrow transplant on a ..... Bone Marrow Transplant. 24 (7): 729–34. doi:10.1038/sj.bmt.1701987. ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

National Marrow Donor Program - Be The Match Marrow Registry

Information and resources for donors, patients and physicians about bone marrow and umbilical cord blood transplants, Be The Match Registry, National Marrow ...

Read more on www.marrow.org

Bone Marrow Transplants - How They Work

A bone marrow transplant is when special cells (called stem cells) that are normally found in the bone marrow are taken out, filtered, and given back either ...

Read more on rarediseases.about.com

Bone Marrow Transplantation and Peripheral Blood - National Cancer ...

A fact sheet that explains the step-by-step procedures of two types of transplantations used with high-dose chemotherapy, including their risks and benefits ...

Read more on www.cancer.gov

Contents

Before the Procedure
Your health care provider will ask you about your health record and do aphysical exam. You will also have many tests before your treatment begins.

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Description
Bone marrow is the soft, fatty tissue inside your bones. Stem cells are immature cells in the bone marrow. Some stem cells grow into different parts of your blood. These parts are:Red blood cells (which carry oxygen to your tissues); White blood cells (which fight infection); Platelets (which help your blood clot); Autologous bone marrow transplant. "Auto" means "self." Stem cells are taken from the patient before the patient gets chemotherapy or radiation treatment. When chemotherapy or radiation...

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How it is performed
There are five stages in the transplant process...

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Indications
Bone marrow or stem cell transplant may be recommended for:Certain cancers, such as leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma ; Illnesses where the bone marrow does not produce the right kind of or enough cells. Some of these are: Sickle cell anemia ; Aplastic anemia; Thalassemia ; Dongenital neutropenia ; Severe immunodeficiency syndromes; Rescue transplant to replace bone marrow, when treatment for cancer has destroyed a patient's bone marrow

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Outlook (Prognosis)
How well you do after transplant greatly depends on these things:What type of bone marrow transplant you had; How well your donor's cells match yours; What type of cancer or illness you have; Your age and overall health; What type of chemotherapy or radiation therapy you had before your transplant; What kind of complications happened after the transplant; Your genetic make-up

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Risks
All bone marrow transplants have risks. The risk is higher or lower depending on many factors. Some of these factors are:What disease you have; What type of treatment (chemotherapy, radiation) you have before the bone marrow transplant; How old you are; How healthy you are when you have your transplant; How good a match your donor is; What type of bone marrow transplant patient you are having (autologous, allogeneic, or umbilical cord blood); Infections: these may be very serious.; Bleeding:...

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