breastinfection

What is breast infection?


Breast infections are usually caused by a common bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) found on normal skin. The bacteria enter through a break or crack in the skin, usually on the nipple.

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Breast Infection

Mastitis is an infection of the tissue of the breast that occurs most frequently during the time of breastfeeding. This infection causes pain, swelling, redness, and increased temperature of the breast. It can occur when bacteria, often from the baby's mouth, enter a milk duct through a crack in the nipple. This causes an infection and painful inflammation of the breast. Breast infections most commonly occur one to three months after the delivery of a baby, but they can occur in women who have not recently delivered as well as in women after menopause. Other causes of infection include chronic mastitis and a rare form of cancer called inflammatory carcinoma.

Breast Infection

A breast infection is an infection in the tissue of the breast.

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Breast Infection

Inflammation of the breast. Most common in women during lactation but it may occur at any age.

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Mastitis

Mastitis is an infection of the breast tissue that causes pain, swelling and redness of the breast. Mastitis most commonly affects women who are breast-feeding, although in rare circumstances this condition can occur outside of lactation.

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Mastitis

Mastitis is a condition that causes the breast tissue to become inflamed. It usually occurs in women who are breastfeeding, so it is often referred to as lactation mastitis.

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Mastitis

Mastitis (mas-TEYE-tis) is an infection of the breast. Puerperal (pu-ER-per-al) mastitis is an infection that may happen to women that breast feed their babies. Puerperal mastitis can happen after you begin breast feeding. Puerperal means the time from when you give birth to your baby, and to up to six weeks after. Most of the time only one breast is affected.

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Breast infection definition - Medical Dictionary definitions of ...

Mar 18, 2011 ... Breast infection: Infection of breast tissue usually caused by bacteria, most often staph (Staphylococcus aureus), which are found on the ...

Read more on www.medterms.com

Breast infection Information on Healthline

A breast infection is an infection in the tissue of the breast.

Read more on www.healthline.com

Mastitis – Benign Breast Infection - Mastitis Description and ...

Jun 19, 2009 ... Women who are breastfeeding may experience breast pain and lumpiness -- and feel panic. It may be mastitis, a benign breast infection that ...

Read more on breastcancer.about.com

LLLI | FAQ on Mastitis

Oct 14, 2007 ... Breast infection A sore breast or plugged duct can become a ... Whether coping with a sore breast, a plugged duct or a breast infection, ...

Read more on www.llli.org

Contents

Exams and Tests
Breastfeeding women are usually not tested. Sometimes for infections that keep returning, milk from the nipple will be cultured. In women who are not breastfeeding, testing may include mammography or breast biopsy.

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Medical advice
Call your health care provider if any portion of the breast tissue becomes reddened, tender, swollen, or hot, or if the lymph nodes in the armpit become tender or swollen.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
The condition usually clears quickly with antibiotic therapy.

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Possible Complications
In severe infections, an abscess may develop. Abscesses need to be drained, either as an office procedure or surgery. Women with abscesses may be told to temporarily stop breast-feeding.

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Prevention
The following may help reduce the risk of breast infections:Careful nipple care to prevent irritation and cracking; Feeding often and pumping milk to prevent engorgement of the breast; Proper breast-feeding technique with good latching by the baby; Weaning slowly, over several weeks, rather than abruptly stopping breastfeeding

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Symptoms
Breast enlargement on one side only Breast lump Breast pain Fever and flu-like symptoms including nausea and vomiting Itching Nipple discharge (may contain pus) Nipple sensation changes Swelling, tenderness, redness, and warmth in breast tissue Tender or enlarged lymph nodes in armpit on the same side

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Treatment
Self-care may include applying moist heat to the infected breast tissue for 15 to 20 minutes four times a day. Antibiotic medications are usually very effective in treating a breast infection. You are encouraged to continue to breast-feed or to pump to relieve breast engorgement from milk production while receiving treatment.

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