cancerprevention

What is cancer prevention?


In treating cancer, the aim is to remove the cancerous cells while making sure that the cancer does not reoccur. This can be challenging because even if only one cancerous cell remains after treatment, it has the potential to cause a new tumour.

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Cancer

Subscribe to our Living with cancer newsletter to stay up to date on cancer topics.

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Cancer Prevention - National Cancer Institute

Cancer prevention information from the National Cancer Institute, including prevention information for specific cancers.

Read more on www.cancer.gov

WHO | Cancer prevention

Cancer prevention. At least one-third of all cancer cases are preventable. Prevention offers the most cost-effective long-term strategy for the control of ...

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CDC - Cancer Prevention and Control

CDC works with national cancer organizations, state health agencies, and other key groups to develop, implement, and promote effective strategies for ...

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Cancer prevention information on MedicineNet.com

Mar 11, 2011 ... Cancer prevention strategies exist for reducing the number of both new cases of cancer and deaths caused by cancer.

Read more on www.medicinenet.com

Stay Healthy

American Cancer Society - The Official Sponsor of Birthdays.™. Welcome ... Take part in a historic cancer prevention study. Choose You ...

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Prevent Cancer Foundation

Cancer prevention and early detection through research, education and community outreach to all populations, including children and the underserved.

Read more on www.preventcancer.org

Cancer Prevention and Screening - MD Anderson Cancer Center

Learn about cancer prevention and screening programs at MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Read more on www.mdanderson.org

Cancer Trends Progress Report - Prevention

Apr 15, 2010 ... A profile of the nation's current cancer risks, rates, and mortality, as well as progress toward their reduction.

Contents

Cancer
Cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the body. Cancerous cells are also called malignant cells.

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Prevention
Many factors affect your health. Some you cannot control, such as your genetic makeup or your age. But you can make changes to your lifestyle. By taking steps toward healthy living, you can help reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer, stroke and other serious diseases. For example, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

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Neoplasms
Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.

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Tumor
A tumor is an abnormal growth of body tissue. Tumors can be cancerous (malignant) or non-cancerous (benign).

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Malignancy
The term "malignancy" refers to cancerous cells that usually have the ability to spread, invade, and destroy tissue. Malignant cells tend to have fast, uncontrolled growth due to changes in their genetic makeup. Malignant cells that are resistant to treatment may return after all detectable traces of them have been removed or destroyed.

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Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor
Cancerous adrenal tumors can spread to the liver or lungs.

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Cholangiocarcinoma
Cancerous tumors of the bile ducts are usually slow-growing and do not spread (metastasize) quickly. However, many of these tumors are already advanced by the time they are found.

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Salivary gland tumors
Cancerous tumors may cause further complications. Rarely, surgery to remove the tumor can injure the facial nerve, which controls movement of the face.

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Melanoma
The cancerous skin cells and a portion of the normal surrounding skin usually have to be surgically removed. A procedure called surgical lymph node biopsy may be necessary to check if the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes. If it has, these lymph nodes may also need to be removed. A skin graft may be necessary after the surgery if a large area of skin is affected. Only the smallest and most shallow melanomas can be cured by surgery alone, so early diagnosis is very important. Radiation...

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Cervical Cancer
Pre-cancerous changes of the cervix and cervical cancer can not be seen with the naked eye. Special tests and tools are needed to spot such conditions.

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Prevention of Osteoporosis
Osteoporosis (or porous bone) is a disease in which bones become weak and are more likely to break (or fracture). Without prevention or treatment, osteoporosis can progress without pain or symptoms until a fracture occurs. Fractures commonly occur in the hip, spine, and wrist. Osteoporosis is the underlying cause of more than 1.5 million fractures annually (300,000 hip fractures, approximately 700,000 vertebral fractures, 250,000 wrist fractures, and more than 300,000 fractures in other areas). The estimated national cost (hospitals and nursing homes) for osteoporosis and related injuries is $14 billion each year in the United States. Osteoporosis is not just an old womans disease. Although it is more common in white or Asian women older than 50 years, osteoporosis can occur in almost any person at any age. In fact, more than 2 million American men have osteoporosis, and in women, bone loss can begin as early as age 25 years. Building strong bones and reaching peak bone density (maximum strength and solidness) can be the best defense against developing osteoporosis. After reaching the peak, which usually occurs by the age of 30, a healthy lifestyle can help keep bones strong.