chlamydia

What is Chlamydia?


The bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis causes chlamydia. The condition most commonly spreads through sexual intercourse and other intimate contact between genitals and the rectal area. It's also possible for a mother to spread chlamydia to her child during delivery, causing pneumonia or a serious eye infection.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
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Chlamydia information from trusted sources:

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is a disease caused by the bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis. It is most commonly sexually transmitted.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Chlamydia

The complications that can arise from long-term chlamydial infection are much more difficult to deal with than uncomplicated chlamydia. However, early diagnosis and treatment will reduce the risk of complications, so you should make sure you have any symptoms investigated as soon as possible. Genito-urinary medicine (GUM) clinics, or sexual health clinics, can provide you with the necessary advice, tests and treatment.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is a bacterial infection disease transmitted when people have sexual relations. It is the most common sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the United States. Among adults, about 5% of the population is estimated to be infected. Among sexually active adolescent females, about 10% are infected.

Chlamydia

To screen for or diagnose chlamydia infection

Read more on www.labtestsonline.org

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is a bacterial infection of the genital tract that spreads easily through sexual contact. You may not know you have chlamydia because the signs and symptoms of pain and fluid discharge don't show up right away, if they show up at all. Many people experience no signs and symptoms.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is the most common sexually-transmitted bacterial disease (STD) in the U.S. Chlamydia is a bacterial infection that is transmitted during contact with the genital or rectal area of an infected person. The majority of people who contract chlamydia are under the age of 25. It is a disease that often does not produce symptoms, so it possible to have it, not realize it, and pass it to someone else unknowingly. The one absolute way of preventing chlamydia is to avoid genital sexual contact. Chlamydia is treated with antibiotics.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Chlamydia

A widespread, gonorrhea-like venereal disease caused by a bacterium (Chlamydia trachomatis). It is believed that 3 to 10 million sexually active teenagers have contracted this disease. It is not known how many adults have Chlamydia.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com

Chlamydial Infections

Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted disease caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis, which affects the genital tract if acquired through vaginal sex, or the mouth or anus if acquired from oral or anal sex. Chlamydia is spread through unprotected sex with an infected person, it can also be spread from an infected mother to her baby at birth.

Read more on www.visualdxhealth.com

Chlamydia Infections

Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted disease caused by bacteria. You get it by having sex or sexual contact with someone who is infected. Both men and women can get it. Chlamydia usually doesn't cause symptoms. If it does, you might notice a burning feeling when you urinate or abnormal discharge from your vagina or penis. In both men and women, chlamydia can infect the urinary tract. In women, infection of the reproductive system can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, which can cause infertility or serious problems with pregnancy. Babies born to infected mothers can get eye infections and pneumonia from chlamydia. In men, chlamydia can infect the epididymis, the tube that carries sperm. This can cause pain, fever and rarely, infertility.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Contents

Complications
Chlamydia can be associated with other health problems, such as: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Women infected with chlamydia are at greater risk of acquiring HIV than are women not infected with chlamydia.; Other sexually transmitted infections. People who have chlamydia may also be at risk of other sexually transmitted infections, such as gonorrhea, syphilis and hepatitis. Your doctor may recommend testing for other sexually transmitted infections if you have chlamydia.; Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). PID is an infection of the uterus and fallopian tubes. Although it may cause no signs or symptoms, PID can damage the fallopian tubes, ovaries and uterus, including the cervix. Untreated...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Diagnosis
Up until five years ago, women were tested for chlamydia by taking a swab from the cervix (neck of the womb) using an instrument called a speculum (similar to a spatula).

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Exams and Tests
The diagnosis of chlamydia infection involves sampling of the urethral discharge in males or cervical secretions in females. If an individual engages in anal sexual contact, samples from the rectum may also be needed. The sample is sent for a fluorescent or monoclonal antibody test, DNA probe test, or cell culture. Some of these tests may also be performed on urine samples.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Medical advice
Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of chlamydia.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Outlook (Prognosis)
Early antibiotic treatment is extremely successful and may prevent the development of long-term complications. Untreated infection, however, may lead to PID, scarring, and ultimately infertility.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Possible Complications
Untreated infection may lead to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), which can cause scarring of the fallopian tubes and result in infertility. Tubal scarring also increases the likelihood of an ectopic pregnancy (tubal pregnancy).

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Preparing for your appointment
If you think you have a sexually transmitted disease, such as chlamydia, make an appointment to see your doctor or nurse practitioner.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Prevention
Chlamydia can be successfully prevented by using condoms. If you have a new partner it is a good idea for you both to be tested for STIs before having sexual intercourse.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Symptoms
Chlamydia may be difficult to detect because early-stage infections often cause few or no signs and symptoms that might alert you to see your doctor. When signs or symptoms do occur, they usually start one to three weeks after you've been exposed to chlamydia. Even when signs and symptoms do occur, they're often mild and passing, making them easy to overlook.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Treatments and drugs
Doctors treat chlamydia with prescription antibiotics such as azithromycin (Zithromax), doxycycline or erythromycin. Your doctor usually prescribes these antibiotics as pills to be swallowed. You may be asked to take your medication in a one-time dose, or you may receive a prescription medication to be taken daily or multiple times a day for five to 10 days.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com