clostridiumperfringens

What is clostridium perfringens?


Clostridium difficile (or C. difficile, C. diff) colitis is a common infection of the colon that is typically associated with the use of antibiotics. It is, therefore, also called antibiotic-associated colitis. Another common name for this condition is pseudomembranous colitis.

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C. difficile

Clostridium difficile, often called C. difficile or "C. diff," is a bacterium that can cause symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon. Illness from C. difficile most commonly affects older adults in hospitals or in long term care facilities and typically occurs after use of antibiotic medications.

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Doribax

DORIBAX, doripenem monohydrate for injection vials contain 500 mg of doripenem on an anhydrous basis, a white to slightly-yellowish off-white sterile crystalline powder. All references to doripenem activity are expressed in terms of the active doripenem moiety. The powder is constituted for intravenous infusion. The pH of the infusion solution is between 4.5 and 5.5. DORIBAX is a penem antibacterial indicated in the treatment of the following infections caused by designated susceptible bacteria: 1.1 Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections 1.2 Complicated Urinary Tract Infections, Including Pyelonephritis 2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION 2.1 Recommended Dosage 2.2 Patients with Renal Impairment 2.3 Preparation of Solutions 2.4 Compatibility 2.5 Storage of Constituted Solutions 3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS 4 CONTRAINDICATIONS 5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS 5.1 Hypersensitivity Reactions 5.2 Interaction with Valproic Acid 5.3 Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea 5.4 Development of Drug-Resistant Bacteria 5.5 Pneumonitis with Inhalational Use 6 ADVERSE REACTIONS 6.1 Adverse Reactions from Clinical Trials 6.2 Postmarketing Experience 7 DRUG INTERACTIONS 7.1 Valproic Acid 7.2 Probenecid 8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS 8.1 Pregnancy 8.3 Nursing Mothers 8.4 Pediatric Use 8.5 Geriatric Use 8.6 Patients with Renal Impairment 10 OVERDOSAGE 11 DESCRIPTION 12 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY 12.1 Mechanism of Action 12.2 Pharmacodynamics 12.3 Pharmacokinetics 12.4 Microbiology 13 NON-CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY 13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, and Impairment of Fertility 14 CLINICAL STUDIES 14.1 Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections 14.2 Complicated Urinary Tract Infections, Including Pyelonephritis 15 REFERENCES 16 HOW SUPPLIED/STORAGE AND HANDLING 17 PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION PRINCIPAL DISPLAY PANEL - 500 mg Vial Label PRINCIPAL DISPLAY PANEL - 500 mg Carton Label FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION...

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Preventing Foodborne Illness Associated with Clostridium perfringens

University of Florida factsheet on the organism and the disease.

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Clostridial Gas Gangrene: eMedicine Infectious Diseases

Jun 23, 2008 ... Clostridium perfringens, previously known as Clostridium welchii, is the most common cause of clostridial gas gangrene (80-90% of cases). ...

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Clostridium perfringens - Iowa State University Extension

Clostridium perfringens is widely present in the environment, and often occurs in the intestines of humans and many animals. C. perfringens is one of the ...

Clostridium perfringens definition - Medical Dictionary ...

Mar 14, 2011 ... Clostridium perfringens: A type of bacteria that is the most common agent of gas gangrene and can also cause food poisoning as well as a ...

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CDC - Estimates of Foodborne Illness Clostridium perfringens

Dec 21, 2010 ... Estimates of Foodborne Illness in the United States Clostridium perfringens.

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Doripenem

The following adverse reactions are discussed in greater detail in other sections of labeling: Anaphylaxis and serious hypersensitivity reactions [see Warnings and Precautions ] Interaction with sodium valproate [see Warnings and Precautions and Drug Interactions ] Clostridium difficile -associated diarrhea [see Warnings and Precautions ] Development of drug-resistant bacteria [see Warnings and Precautions ] Pneumonitis with inhalational use [see Warnings and Precautions ] Adverse Reactions...

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Clostridium Perfringens | DrGreene.com

Learn about a common cause of food poisoning that can be avoided with proper food handling.

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Differential proteomic analysis of Clostridium perfringens ...

by SI Alam - 2009 - Cited by 6 - Related articles

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Contents

C.diff
Clostridium difficile (C. diff) is a bacterium that is present naturally in the gut of around 3% of adults and 66% of children.

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C. difficile
To detect the presence of Clostridium difficile toxin

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Pseudomembranous colitis
Pseudomembranous colitis is infection of the large intestine (colon) with an overgrowth of Clostridium difficile bacteria.

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Clostridium Difficile Infection
A Clostridium (klo-STRID-ee-um) difficile (DIFF-i-sile) infection is also known as Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. It occurs when bacteria (germs), called Clostridium difficile or C. difficile, affect the colon (large bowel). Normally, different bacteria live inside the colon and do not harm the body. There is a balance between good and helpful bacteria and bad bacteria, such as C. difficile. A clostridium difficile infection happens when this healthy balance changes. This may give C. difficile a chance to multiply (increase in number) and cause an infection.

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C. diff. infections
Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a bacterium that causes diarrhea and more serious intestinal conditions such as colitis. Symptoms include People in good health usually don't get C. difficile disease. You might get the disease if you have an illness that requires prolonged use of antibiotics. Increasingly, the disease can also be spread in the hospital. The elderly are also at risk. Treatment is with antibiotics.

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Gas gangrene
Gas gangrene is a potentially deadly form of tissue death (gangrene). See also: Necrotizing subcutaneous infection

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Stool C. difficile toxin
The stool C. difficile toxin test detects harmful substances produced by the bacterium Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) in a stool sample. This infection is a common cause of diarrhea after antibiotic use.

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Botulism
Botulism is a rare but serious illness caused by Clostridium botulinum bacteria. The bacteria may enter the body through wounds, or they may live in improperly canned or preserved food.

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Tetanus
The bacteria that cause tetanus, Clostridium tetani, are found in soil, dust and animal feces. When they enter a deep flesh wound, spores of the bacteria may produce a powerful toxin, tetanospasmin, which acts on various areas of your nervous system. The effect of the toxin on your nerves can cause muscle stiffness and spasms the major signs of tetanus.

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Clostridium perfringens - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Clostridium perfringens (formerly known as C. welchii) is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium of the genus Clostridium. ...

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Bad Bug Book > BBB - Clostridium perfringens
May 4, 2009 ... Features cause, associated foods, symptoms, diagnosis, and outbreaks.

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