condomuse

What is Condom Use?


A condom is a thin pouch that helps prevent pregnancy if used properly. It may help if you and your partner choose to plan how many children you want, and when to have them. It also helps prevent sexually transmitted diseases (STD), such as HIV infection and herpes. It prevents a man's sperm from reaching and touching a woman's cervix. Preventing this may help stop infection from spreading between sexual partners. A condom needs to be placed on an erect penis before you have sexual intercourse (sex). It is left in place during sex until the penis is removed from the vagina after an ejaculation.

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Condom Use information from trusted sources:

Condoms

Sperm can sometimes get into the vagina during sex even when wearing a condom. This may happen if...

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Proper Condom Use - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"Proper Condom Use" is episode 72 of Comedy Central's South Park. It originally aired on August 1, 2001. Contents. 1 Plot; 2 Reaction; 3 Ratings and ...

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How do you use a condom?

Throw out the used condom right away. Use a condom only once. Never use the same condom for vaginal and anal intercourse. Never use a condom that has been ...

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Condom Use by Adolescents -- Committee on Adolescence 107 (6 ...

May 1, 2005 ... While many condom education and availability programs have been shown to have modest effects on condom use, there is no evidence that these ...

CDC - Condom Effectiveness - Male Latex Condoms and Sexually ...

Similarly, studies have shown that condom use reduces the risk of other STDs. ... Condom use may reduce the risk for HPV-associated diseases (e.g., ...

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Condom Use Low in UK Black Caribbean Community After HIV Diagnosis

by B McCall

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How to Use a Condom

Feb 5, 2008 ... How to Use a Condom. If you and your partner are considering having .... If you follow the instructions above perfectly, condom use is 97% ...

HIV and AIDS Activities > Condoms and Sexually Transmitted ...

Jul 22, 2010 ... But if you do have sex, be sure to use a condom that covers the entire penis ... There's no absolute guarantee even when you use a condom. ...

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Clindesse

This cream contains mineral oil that may weaken latex or rubber products such as condoms or vaginal contraceptive diaphragms. Therefore, the use of such barrier contraceptives is not recommended concurrently or for 5 days following treatment with Clindesse. During this time period, condoms may not be reliable for preventing pregnancy or for protecting against transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases.

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How to Use A Female Condom

Jul 17, 2009 ... A simple step-by-step guide to using female condoms. Learn how to use the female condom during vaginal and/or rectal intercourse.

Read more on womenshealth.about.com

Contents

Female Condom Use
A female condom is a soft, loosely fit plastic pouch that prevents pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease (STD). It lines your vagina completely to prevent contact between the penis and the vagina. It has a flexible outer ring attached to one end and an inner ring lying inside the closed end. The attached outer ring at the end of the condom is located outside your vagina. The inner ring allows the condom to be inserted into your vagina and kept in place. The condom can be placed inside your vagina up to eight hours before sexual contact.

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How to Use a Condom
Among the many barrier methods of birth control, the condom for men is used most often. Condoms are inexpensive and available in many convenient locations, without a doctors prescription. In addition to preventing pregnancy, if used properly, a condom may also protect users from infecting a sex partner with a sexually transmitted disease. Although no form of birth control is 100% effective, the condom can be quite effective if it is put on correctly.

Condoms
A condom is a type of birth control (contraceptive) that is worn during intercourse to prevent pregnancy and the spread of some sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), such as: Chlamydia Gonorrhea HIV See also: Female condoms

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Condom, male
Condoms are available without a prescription. They're sold in many stores and from vending machines in some restrooms. Condoms may be less expensive at family planning clinics such as Planned Parenthood. They're also usually available at university health centers.

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female condom
The female condom is a soft, loosefitting polyurethane (plastic) pouch with two O-rings on the ends. One ring is inserted into the vagina and holds the female condom in place, and the open-end ring remains outside the vagina. Only one female condom, the FC female condom, is available in the United States at this time. A second-generation model, the FC2, is used in other countries but doesn't have Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval in the U.S. Other models are currently being tested as well.

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External incontinence devices
External incontinence devices are products, called appliances, worn on the outside of the body to protect the skin from constant leakage of stool or urine. Certain medical conditions can cause a person to frequently lose control of their bowel or bladder.

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Female condoms
The female condom, like the male condom, is a barrier device used for birth control.

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Over-the-counter birth control
CONDOMS

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Chlamydia
The surest way to prevent a chlamydia infection is to abstain from sexual activities. Short of that, you can: Use condoms. Use a male latex condom or a female polyurethane condom during each sexual contact. Condoms used properly during every sexual encounter reduce but don't eliminate the risk of infection., Limit your number of sex partners. Having multiple sex partners puts you at a high risk of contracting chlamydia and other sexually transmitted diseases., Get regular screenings for sexually transmitted diseases. If you're sexually active, particularly if you have multiple partners, talk with your doctor about how often you should be screened for chlamydia and other sexually transmitted...

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Sexual Health, Teen
During your teens you become sexually mature. If you're a girl, you develop breasts and begin to get your period. If you're a boy, your penis and testicles become larger. If you have sex, you could get pregnant or get someone pregnant. Whether you choose to have sex or not, it is a good idea to know about safe sex and how sex affects your health. Besides pregnancy, having sex puts you at risk of getting a sexually transmitted disease, such as herpes or genital warts, or HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The only way to be completely safe is not to have sex. If you choose to have sex, however, latex condoms are the best protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Condoms are also a form of birth control to help prevent pregnancy.

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Male contraceptive pill
The past 50 years have seen little change in male contraception, compared to the range of options available to women. The only options available to men are condoms and vasectomies.

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