copd

What is COPD?


Smoking is the main cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is responsible for around 80% of cases. The likelihood of developing the condition increases the more that you smoke and the longer you have been smoking.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Also known as emphysema, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, chronic bronchitis, COAD, bronchitis - chronic, Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, pulmonary disease, chronic obstructive
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COPD information from trusted sources:

COPD Treatment - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD ...

Jul 28, 2010 ... COPD is not a reversible condition, but treatment can slow its progression - smoking cessation being the most important.

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) - National Jewish Health

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a severe lung disease often associated with chronic bronchitis and/or emphysema.

Read more on www.nationaljewish.org

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)—treatments

COPD treatments and lifestyle changes can help you feel better, stay more active , and slow the progress of the disease.

Read more on www.nhlbi.nih.gov

COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) Symptoms, Causes, and ...

Nov 29, 2010 ... Symptoms of COPD include chronic cough, shortness of breath, and recurrent ... These patients do not have COPD. However, if asthma is left ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - Wikipedia, the free ...

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), also known as chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD), chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD), ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) makes it hard for you to breathe. Coughing up mucus is often the first sign of COPD. Chronic bronchitis and emphysema are common COPDs. Your airways branch out inside your lungs like an upside-down tree. At the end of each branch are small, balloon-like air sacs. In healthy people, both the airways and air sacs are springy and elastic. When you breathe in, each air sac fills with air like a small balloon. The balloon deflates when you exhale. In COPD, your airways and air sacs lose their shape and become floppy, like a stretched-out rubber band.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

COPD Health Center -- WebMD

WebMD's COPD Health Center provides in-depth information on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease including symptoms, causes, treatment options, diagnosis, ...

Read more on www.webmd.com

COPD

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) refers to a group of lung diseases that block airflow and make it increasingly difficult for you to breathe.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

WHO | Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a life-threatening lung disease that interferes with normal breathing – it is more than a “smoker's cough”. ...

Read more on www.who.int

COPD-Alert

Support and advocacy group for patients, caregivers, and medical professionals. Provides information about the disease and links to valuable resources.

Read more on www.copd-alert.com

Contents

Complications
Complications of COPD include: Respiratory infections. When you have COPD, you're more likely to get frequent colds, the flu or pneumonia. Plus, any respiratory infection can make it much more difficult to breathe and produce further irreversible damage to the lung tissue. Talk to your doctor about annual flu shots and regular pneumococcal vaccines.; High blood pressure. COPD may cause high blood pressure in the arteries that bring blood to your lungs (pulmonary hypertension).; Heart problems. For reasons that aren't fully understood, COPD increases your risk of heart disease, including heart attack.; Lung cancer. Smokers with chronic bronchitis are at a higher risk of developing lung cancer...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Coping and support
Living with COPD can be difficult especially as it becomes more and more difficult to catch your breath. You may have to give up activities you previously enjoyed. And your family and friends may face significant changes and challenges in an effort to help you. You may also find yourself facing some tough questions, such as how long you have to live and what you will do if you no longer can take care of yourself.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Diagnosis
If you have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) you will often be short of breath, have a persistent cough, and a build-up of mucus and phlegm in your throat.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Lifestyle and home remedies
If you have COPD, you can take steps to feel better and slow the damage to your lungs: Control your breathing. Talk to your doctor or respiratory therapist about techniques for breathing more efficiently throughout the day. Also be sure to discuss breathing positions and relaxation techniques that you can use when you're short of breath.; Clear your airways. In COPD, mucus tends to collect in your air passages and can be difficult to clear. Controlled coughing, drinking plenty of water and using a humidifier may help.; Exercise regularly. It may seem difficult to exercise when you have trouble breathing, but regular exercise can improve your overall strength and endurance and strengthen...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Preparing for your appointment
If your primary care doctor suspects that you have COPD, you'll likely be referred to a pulmonologist, a doctor who specializes in lung disorders. These suggestions may help you get the most from your appointment: Be aware of any pre-appointment restrictions. At the time you make your appointment, be sure to ask if there's anything you need to do in advance to prepare for diagnostic tests you might have.; Write down all symptoms and changes you're experiencing, even if they seem unrelated to your lungs or breathing.; Write down key personal information, including any recent life changes or other stressors.; Make a list of important medical information, including recent surgical procedures,...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Prevention
There are aspects of your lifestyle that you can change in order to reduce your risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or to help ease your symptoms.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Risk factors
Risk factors for COPD include: Exposure to tobacco smoke. The most significant risk factor for COPD is long-term cigarette smoking. The more years you smoke and the more packs you smoke, the greater your risk. Symptoms of COPD usually appear about 10 years after you start smoking. Pipe smokers, cigar smokers and people exposed to large amounts of secondhand smoke also are at risk.; Occupational exposure to dusts and chemicals. Long-term exposure to chemical fumes, vapors and dusts can irritate and inflame your lungs.; Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This condition is a severe form of acid reflux the backflow of acid and other stomach contents into your esophagus. GERD can make COPD...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Risks
If you have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and you are planning to fly, go to your GP for a fitness-to-fly assessment. This involves measuring your oxygen levels and checking your spirometry (breathing test) results (see the Diagnosis section).

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Symptoms
If you smoke, you have an increased risk of getting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The condition can build up over a number of years, as your lungs are gradually damaged more and more by smoking.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Treatment
There is no cure for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Treatment is mainly used to relieve any symptoms that you have.

Read more on www.nhs.uk