crohnsdisease

What is Crohn's disease?


Many people with either Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis have used some form of complementary or alternative therapy. Some commonly used therapies include: Herbal and nutritional supplements; Probiotics; Fish oil; Acupuncture

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Also known as Crohns Disease, Crohn Disease, ibd, inflammatory bowel disease, Ileocolitis, Regional Enteritis, Granulomatous Colitis
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Crohn's disease

Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It causes inflammation of the lining of your digestive tract, which can lead to abdominal pain, severe diarrhea and even malnutrition.

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Crohn Disease

Crohn disease is a chronic (slowly developing, long-term) inflammation of the digestive tract. It can affect any part of the digestive tract from the mouth to the anus but usually involves the terminal part of the small intestine, the beginning of the large intestine (cecum), and the area around the anus. The inflammation causes uncomfortable and bothersome symptoms and may produce serious damage to the digestive tract. Crohn disease is sometimes called regional enteritis or ileitis. It and a similar condition called ulcerative colitis are referred to together as inflammatory bowel diseases. These illnesses are known for their unpredictable flares and remissions. The inflammation usually starts in one or more areas of the mucosa that lines the inside of the intestines. The disease may invade deeper tissues of the intestinal wall and spread to involve more areas of the bowel. Ulcers may form at the sites of the most intense inflammation. The ulcers may spread and become very large but are usually separated by areas of relatively healthy tissue with little or no inflammation. The mucosal lining of the intestines in Crohn disease is often described as looking like a cobblestone street, with areas of ulceration separated by narrow areas of healthy tissue. The damage to the intestinal wall caused by the inflammation results in a wide variety of symptoms and complications.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. The disease can affect any area from the mouth to the anus. It often affects the lower part of the small intestine called the ileum. Crohn's disease seems to run in some families. It can occur in people of all age groups but is most often diagnosed in young adults. Common symptoms are pain in the abdomen and diarrhea. Bleeding from the rectum, weight loss, joint pain, skin problems and fever may also occur. Children with the disease may have growth problems. Other problems can include intestinal blockage and malnutrition.

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Crohn's disease

Crohn's disease is a chronic (long-term) condition that causes inflammation of the lining of the digestive system.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Crohn's disease

Crohn's disease is an ongoing inflammatory disease of the bowel that most often causes abdominal pain and diarrhea. Crohn's disease involves periodic pain, swelling and redness (inflammation) and loss of tissue (ulceration) of the gastrointestinal tract. Most people have involvement of the lower part of the small intestine (ileum), but any part of the digestive system can be affected, from the mouth down to the anus. Symptoms are most commonly abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea, but vary depending on the location of the inflammation.

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Gum disease

Any abnormality, inflammatory or degenerative, of the tissue around a tooth. (Periodontal means "located around a tooth") The term refers to any disorder of the gums or other supporting structures of the teeth. Periodontitis is the inflammation or degeneration, or both, of the dental periosteum, alveolar bone, cementum, and adjacent gingiva. Suppuration ususally occurs, supporting bone is resorbed, teeth become loose, and recession of gingivae occurs. Usually follows chronic gingivitis, Vincent's infection, or poor dental hygiene.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com

Infectious Diseases

Each infectious disease has its own specific signs and symptoms. General signs and symptoms common to many infectious diseases include: Fever, Loss of appetite, Fatigue, Muscle aches

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Celiac disease - resources

If you have been diagnosed with celiac disease , it is very important that you receive counseling from a registered dietitian who specializes in celiac disease and gluten-free diets. Such an expert can give you tell you where gluten-free products can be purchased, and will share important resources that explain your disease and treatment. A dietitian is also uniquely qualified to provide counseling on associated conditions that commonly accompany celiac disease, such as diabetes, lactose intolerance, weight loss or gain, or vitamin/mineral deficiency. The following organizations provide additional information: Celiac Disease Foundation - www.celiac.org Celiac Sprue Association - www.csaceliacs.org Gluten Intolerance Group - www.gluten.net National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse - www.digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/celiac/index.htm

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Raynaud's disease

Raynaud's disease is a disorder in which the blood vessels to the fingers and toes (digits) become abnormally closed off (constricted). The fingers and toes of individuals with Raynaud's disease change color from white to blue to red, often causing them to feel numb. Raynaud's disease is sometimes seen with autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and lupus, where the body's immune system turns against itself, causing various symptoms. Other causes of Raynaud's disease include repeated trauma/vibration, abnormalities in the structure of blood vessels, and drug injection into one type of blood vessel (arteries).

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Liver disease

The term "liver disease" applies to many diseases and disorders that cause the liver to function improperly or cease functioning. Abnormal results of liver function tests often suggest liver disease. See also: Amebic liver abscess Autoimmune hepatitis Biliary atresia Cirrhosis Coccidioidomycosis, disseminated Delta agent (Hepatitis D) Drug-induced cholestasis Hemochromatosis Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Hepatocellular carcinoma Liver cancer Liver disease due to alcohol Primary biliary cirrhosis Pyogenic liver abscess Reye's syndrome Sclerosing cholangitis Wilson's disease

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Contents

Causes
The exact cause of Crohn's disease remains unknown. Previously, diet and stress were suspect, but now doctors know that although these factors may aggravate existing Crohn's disease, they don't cause it. Now, researchers believe that a number of factors, such as heredity and a malfunctioning immune system, play a role in the development of Crohn's disease.

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Complications
Crohn's disease may lead to one or more of the following complications: Bowel obstruction. Crohn's disease affects the entire thickness of the intestinal wall. Over time, parts of the bowel can thicken and narrow, which may block the flow of digestive contents through the affected part of your intestine. Some cases require surgery to remove the diseased portion of your bowel.; Ulcers. Chronic inflammation can lead to open sores (ulcers) anywhere in your digestive tract, including your mouth and anus, and in the genital area (perineum) and anus.; Fistulas. Sometimes ulcers can extend completely through the intestinal wall, creating a fistula an abnormal connection between different parts...

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Coping and support
Crohn's disease doesn't just affect you physically it takes an emotional toll as well. If signs and symptoms are severe, your life may revolve around a constant need to run to the toilet. In some cases, you may barely be able to leave the house. When you do, you might worry about an accident, and this anxiety only makes your symptoms worse.

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Diagnosis
There is no single test that can be used to confirm or disprove a diagnosis of Crohn's disease.

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Exams and Tests
A physical examination may reveal an abdominal mass or tenderness, skin rash, swollen joints, or mouth ulcers. Tests to diagnose Crohn's disease include: Barium enema ; Colonoscopy ; Computed tomography (CT scan) of the abdomen ; Endoscopy, including capsule endoscopy; Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen ; Sigmoidoscopy ; Enteroscopy ; Upper GI series ; Albumin ; C-reactive protein; Erythrocyte sedimentation rate; Fecal fat ; Hemoglobin; Liver function tests; White blood cell count

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Lifestyle and home remedies
Sometimes you may feel helpless when facing Crohn's disease. But changes in your diet and lifestyle may help control your symptoms and lengthen the time between flare-ups.

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Medical advice
Call for an appointment with your health care provider if:You have symptoms of Crohn's disease; You are already diagnosed with Crohn's disease and your symptoms get worse or do not improve with treatment; You are already diagnosed with Crohn's disease and you develop new symptoms

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Outlook (Prognosis)
There is no cure for Crohn's disease. The condition is marked by periods of improvement followed by flare-ups of symptoms.

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Possible Complications
Abscess; Bowel obstructions; Complications of corticosteroid therapy, such as thinning of the bones; Erythema nodosum; Fistulas in the following areas:; Bladder; Skin; Vagina; Impaired growth and sexual development in children; Inflammation of the joints; Lesions in the eye; Nutritional deficiency (particularly vitamin B12 deficiency); Pyoderma gangrenosum

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Preparing for your appointment
Symptoms of Crohn's disease may first prompt a visit to your family doctor or general practitioner. However, you may then be referred to a doctor who specializes in treating digestive disorders (gastroenterologist).

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Risk factors
Risk factors for Crohn's disease may include: Age. Crohn's disease can occur at any age, but you're likely to develop the condition when you're young. Most people are diagnosed with Crohn's between the ages of 20 and 30.; Ethnicity. Although whites have the highest risk of the disease, it can affect any ethnic group. If you're of Ashkenazi Jewish descent, your risk is even higher.; Family history. You're at higher risk if you have a close relative, such as a parent, sibling or child, with the disease. As many as 1 in 5 people with Crohn's disease has a family member with the disease.; Cigarette smoking. Cigarette smoking is the most important controllable risk factor for developing Crohn's...

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Self help
While there is no evidence that diet causes, or plays a role in, Crohn's disease, some people with the condition have found that certain foods seem to aggravate their symptoms.

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Support Groups
The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America offers support groups throughout the United States. See http://www.ccfa.org/chapters/

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Symptoms
Common symptoms of Crohn's disease include...

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Treatments and drugs
The goal of medical treatment is to reduce the inflammation that triggers your signs and symptoms. In the best cases, this may lead not only to symptom relief but also to long-term remission. Treatment for Crohn's disease usually involves drug therapy or, in certain cases, surgery.

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