cuts

What is cuts?


It may not always be possible to avoid a cut or a graze, so it is a good idea to have a first aid kit at home, work and at school in case of accidents. There are also several precautions that you can take to minimise the risk of cuts and grazes, which are outlined below.

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cuts information from trusted sources:

"Doc Fix" Delaying Medicare Pay Cuts Is Law Until November 30

by M Crane

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Finger Cuts - How to Treat Cut Fingers

Nov 29, 2008 ... First aid for cut fingers or other minor wounds mean keeping the injury clean more than stopping bleeding. These simple injuries can be ...

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Six-month drug regimen cuts HIV risk for breastfeeding infants ...

Mar 3, 2011 ... The longer nevirapine regimen achieved a 75 percent reduction in HIV transmission risk through breast milk for the infants of HIV-infected ...

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Contents

Cuts or Lacerations
A cut refers to a skin wound with separation of the connective tissue elements. Unlike an abrasion (a wound caused by friction or scraping), none of the skin is missing the skin is just separated. A cut is typically thought of as a wound caused by a sharp object (such as a knife or a shard of glass). The term laceration implies a torn or jagged wound. Lacerations tend to be caused by blunt trauma (such as a blow, fall, or collision). Cuts and lacerations are terms for the same condition.

Cuts and puncture wounds
A cut or laceration is an injury that results in a break or opening in the skin. It may be near the surface or deep, smooth or jagged. It may injure deep tissues, such as tendons, muscles, ligaments, nerves, blood vessels, or bone. A puncture is a wound made by a pointed object (like a nail, knife, or sharp tooth).

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Self-injury/cutting
Self-injury is the act of deliberately harming your own body, such as cutting or burning yourself. It's not meant as a suicide attempt and isn't part of a socially acceptable cultural or artistic expression or ritual, such as tattooing. Rather, self-injury is an unhealthy effort to cope with overwhelming negative emotions, such as intense anger, tension and frustration.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Coral Cuts
Corals are animals that have calcified outer skeletons with sharp edges. Coral formations occur in tropical and subtropical waters. Because coral formations are rigid and sharp, injury can occur after accidental contact, leaving a small amount of animal protein and calcareous material in the wound. The small, harmless-appearing cut may quickly develop into an infected wound. Some corals contain nematocysts, which can produce a more significant injury (see Jellyfish Stings and Fire Coral Cuts).

Surgeonfish Cuts
Surgeonfish have bladelike spines on their sides near the tail, which can inflict deep lacerations (cuts). They are found in the Atlantic Ocean and in the tropics and subtropics of the Indo-Pacific Ocean and the Red Sea. Surgeonfish tend to ignore divers and move away when approached. Their spines may cause deep, penetrating wounds that have a high risk of infection.

Fire Coral Cuts
Fire corals are not true corals. Fire corals are members of the Cnidaria phylum, and although fire coral looks like coral, it is more closely related to jellyfish and other stinging anemones. Fire corals have a bright yellow-green and brown skeletal covering and are widely distributed in tropical and subtropical waters. Divers often mistake fire coral for seaweed, and accidental contact is common. The very small nematocysts on fire corals contain tentacles that protrude from numerous surface pores (see Jellyfish Sting). In addition, fire corals have a sharp, calcified external skeleton that can scrape the skin.

Cuts and scrapes: First aid - MayoClinic.com
Minor cuts and scrapes usually don't require a trip to the emergency room. Yet proper care is essential to avoid infection or other complications. ...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
First Aid: Cuts, Scrapes and Stitches -- familydoctor.org
Learn about basic first aid for cuts, scrapes and stitches.

Read more on familydoctor.org
Cuts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cuts is an American sitcom that aired on the UPN network from February 14, 2005, to May 11, 2006, and is a spin-off of another UPN series, One on One. ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org
Cuts, Scrapes, and Puncture Wounds Information by MedicineNet.com
Mar 12, 2011 ... Learn the cuts, scrapes, and puncture wounds including the best way to care for the injury, when to see a doctor, tetanus shots, and signs ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com
Checking Out Cuts, Scratches, and Abrasions
If you're wearing a bandage right now, chances are you have a cut, scratch, or abrasion. Find out more about them in this article for kids.

Read more on kidshealth.org