cystitis

What is cystitis?


When treated promptly and properly, bladder infections rarely lead to complications. But left untreated, they can become something more serious. Complications may include: Kidney infection. An untreated bladder infection can lead to kidney infection (pyelonephritis), which could be associated with a bacterial bloodstream infection (bacteremia). Kidney infections may permanently damage your kidneys. Young children and older adults are at the greatest risk of kidney damage due to bladder infections because their symptoms are often overlooked or mistaken for other conditions. Blood in the urine. Blood found in the urine (hematuria) is not uncommon with chemotherapy- or radiation-induced cystitis....

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Also known as ic, pbs, bladder infection, painful bladder syndrome, urinary tract infection - adults, Cystitides, bladder infection - adults
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cystitis information from trusted sources:

Cystitis

Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a condition that causes discomfort or pain in the bladder and abdomen. It is far more common in women than in men. The symptoms vary from case to case. Some people have an urgent or frequent need to urinate. Women's symptoms often get worse during their periods. They may also have pain with sexual intercourse. Many scientists believe IC is actually several diseases. Many use the term painful bladder syndrome (PBS) to describe urinary pain for which they cannot find a cause. There is no one test to tell if you have IC/PBS. Doctors often run tests to rule out other possible causes of symptoms. There is no cure for IC/PBS, but treatments can help most people feel better. They include distending, or inflating, the bladder, bathing the inside of the bladder with a medicine solution, oral medicines and in rare cases, surgery.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Cystitis

Cystitis is the medical term for inflammation of the bladder. Most of the time, the inflammation is caused by a bacterial infection, in which case it may be referred to as a urinary tract infection (UTI). A bladder infection can be painful and annoying, and can become a serious health problem if the infection spreads to your kidneys.

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Cystitis

Cystitis means ‘inflammation of the bladder'. It causes:

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Cystitis

Inflammation of the bladder usually occurring secondary to ascending urinary tract infections. Associated organs (kidney, prostate, urethra) may be involved. May be acute or chronic.

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Interstitial cystitis

Inflammation is a protective reaction of the body tissue to irritation, injury, or infection. Inflammation of the bladder is called cystitis. When the inflammation is caused by bacterial infection, it is referred to as bacterial cystitis or just cystitis. Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a condition that causes pain and inflammation in the bladder when no infection is found. (Other causes of noninfectious inflammation of the bladder are also possible.)

Cystitis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cystitis is a term that refers to urinary bladder inflammation that results from any one of a number of distinct syndromes. It is most commonly caused by a ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Interstitial Cystitis / Painful Bladder Syndrome

Describes the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of interstitial cystitis (IC). Defines the two types of IC, ulcerative and nonulcerative.

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Interstitial Cystitis Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatment ...

Mar 11, 2011 ... The term cystitis refers to any inflammation of the bladder. ... Interstitial cystitis is diagnosed when the symptoms occur without evidence ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com

Interstitial Cystitis

Feb 21, 2010 ... Important It is possible that the main title of the report Interstitial Cystitis is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms ...

Read more on www.webmd.com

Interstitial Cystitis -- familydoctor.org

Information about the symptoms, causes, diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis.

Read more on familydoctor.org

Contents

Causes
The most common cause of cystitis is a bacterial infection. If bacteria reach the bladder, they can multiply and irritate the bladder lining, causing the symptoms of cystitis.

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Diagnosis
If you have had cystitis before, you may be able to recognise the symptoms and diagnose the condition yourself. However, men and children with cystitis should always see their GP. You should also see your GP if...

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Lifestyle and home remedies
Cystitis can be painful, but you can take steps to ease your discomfort: Use a heating pad. Sometimes a heating pad placed over your lower abdomen can help minimize feelings of bladder pressure or pain. Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of fluids, but avoid coffee, alcohol, soft drinks with caffeine, citrus juices and spicy foods until your infection has cleared. These items can irritate your bladder and aggravate your frequent or urgent need to urinate. Take a sitz bath. It may be helpful to soak in a bathtub of warm water (sitz bath) for 15 to 20 minutes.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Prevention
It is not always possible to prevent cystitis, but there are some steps that you can take to avoid the condition.

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Risk factors
Some people are more likely than are others to develop bladder infections or recurrent urinary tract infections. Women are one such group. A key reason is anatomy. Women have a shorter urethra than men have, which cuts down on the distance bacteria must travel to reach the bladder.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Symptoms
Symptoms of cystitis, in both men and women, include...

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Treatment
The symptoms of cystitis usually clear up without treatment within 4-9 days. There are some self-help treatments that can ease the discomfort of any symptoms, or your GP may prescribe antibiotics.

Read more on www.nhs.uk