dementia

What is Dementia?


Use caution when considering alternative remedies to ward off or slow the progression of dementia, especially if taking other medications. Dietary supplements, vitamins and herbal remedies aren't regulated, and claims about their benefits are often based on personal testimonials rather than scientific research. Some of the more popular alternative remedies for Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia are: Vitamin E. Some studies have shown that vitamin E can slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease, while other studies have shown no benefit. Doctors warn against taking large dosages of vitamin E, especially if you're taking blood thinners, because of an increased risk of bleeding.;...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Also known as mci, Dementias, senility, dlb, mild cognitive impairment, Amentia, chronic brain syndrome
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Dementia information from trusted sources:

Dementia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dementia (taken from Latin, originally meaning "madness", from de- "without" + ment, the root of mens "mind") is a serious loss of cognitive ability in a ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Dementia Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments and Causes ...

Dementia information including symptoms, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, treatment, causes, patient stories, videos, forums, prevention, and prognosis.

Read more on www.wrongdiagnosis.com

THE MERCK MANUAL OF GERIATRICS, Ch. 40, Dementia

Overview and fact sheet on dementia from the Merck Medical Manual.

Read more on merck.com

FCA: Dementia, Caregiving and Controlling Frustration

Caring for an individual with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia can be challenging and, at times, overwhelming. Frustration is a normal and valid ...

Read more on www.caregiver.org

Senility

Dementia is a word for a group of symptoms caused by disorders that affect the brain. It is not a specific disease. People with dementia may not be able to think well enough to do normal activities, such as getting dressed or eating. They may lose their ability to solve problems or control their emotions. Their personalities may change. They may become agitated or see things that are not there. Memory loss is a common symptom of dementia. However, memory loss by itself does not mean you have dementia. People with dementia have serious problems with two or more brain functions, such as memory and language.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Vascular dementia

Vascular dementia is an umbrella term that describes impairments in cognitive function caused by problems in blood vessels that feed the brain.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Alzheimer's Association - Mixed Dementia

Mixed dementia is a condition in which Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia occur at the same time. Many experts believe mixed dementia occurs more ...

Read more on www.alz.org

Dementia definition - Alzheimer's Disease Information on ...

Nov 29, 2010 ... Our Dementia Main Article provides a comprehensive look at the who, what, ... Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia. ...

Read more on www.medterms.com

DEMENTIA

Dementia includes multiple cognitive deficits that occur gradually over ... common disease causing dementia is Alzheimer's disease ...

Read more on www.hpna.org

Dementia - Definition of Dementia

Apr 11, 2008 ... What's the difference between dementia and Alzheimer's?

Read more on alzheimers.about.com

Contents

Causes
Dementia has many causes. It's not always caused by the same disease. And some dementias such as Alzheimer's disease occur on their own, not as a result of another disease. Much is still unknown about how some diseases may be linked to dementia.

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Complications
Dementia can affect the functioning of many body systems and, therefore, the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks. Dementia may lead to problems such as: Inadequate nutrition. Nearly everyone who has dementia will at some point reduce or stop eating and drinking. Often, advanced dementia causes people to lose control of the muscles used to chew and swallow, putting them at risk of choking or aspirating food into their lungs. If this happens, it can block breathing and cause pneumonia. People with advanced dementia also lose the feeling of hunger and, with it, the desire to eat. Depression, side effects of medications, constipation, and other conditions such as infections also can decrease...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Coping and support
Receiving a diagnosis of dementia can be devastating to you and your loved ones. Many things need to be considered to ensure that you and those around you are as prepared as possible for dealing with a condition that's unpredictable and continually changing.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Diagnosis
Confirming a diagnosis of dementia can be difficult, particularly when the condition is in its early stages. This is because many of the symptoms of dementia can be caused by other conditions.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Exams and Tests
Dementia can often be diagnosed with a history and physical exam by a skilled doctor or nurse. A health care provider will take a history, do a physical exam (including a neurological exam), and perform some tests of mental function called a mental status examination.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Lifestyle and home remedies
You can take steps to improve quality of life as the disease progresses.

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Medical advice
Call your health care provider if:Dementia develops or a sudden change in mental status occurs; The condition of a person with dementia gets worse; You are unable to care for a person with dementia at home

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
NICE guidelines
For more information on dementia, it is important to go to a reliable source.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Outlook (Prognosis)
People with mild cognitive impairment do not always develop dementia. However, when dementia does occur, it usually gets worse and often decreases quality of life and lifespan.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Possible Complications
Complications depend on the cause of the dementia, but may include the following:Abuse by an overstressed caregiver; Increased infections anywhere in the body; Loss of ability to function or care for self; Loss of ability to interact; Reduced lifespan; Side effects of medications used to treat the disorder

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Preparing for your appointment
Most likely, you'll first see your primary care provider if you have concerns about dementia. In some cases, you may be referred to a doctor who specializes in specific symptoms, such as a neurologist for brain and nerve disorders. Because appointments can be brief, and because there's often a lot of ground to cover, it's a good idea to be well prepared. Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

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Prevention
While it is not possible to prevent all cases of dementia, there are some measures that can help prevent vascular dementia, as well as cardiovascular diseases, such as strokes and heart attacks. As experts in treating dementia often say, ‘What is good for your heart is also good for your head.'

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Risk factors
Many factors can eventually lead to dementia. Some, such as age, can't be changed. Others can be addressed to reduce your risk.

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Symptoms
Dementia symptoms vary depending on the cause, but common signs and symptoms include: Memory loss; Difficulty communicating; Inability to learn or remember new information; Difficulty with planning and organizing; Difficulty with coordination and motor functions; Personality changes; Inability to reason; Inappropriate behavior; Paranoia; Agitation; Hallucinations

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Treatments and drugs
Treatment of dementia may help slow or minimize the development of symptoms.

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