downsyndrome

What is Down Syndrome?


Children with Down syndrome can have a variety of complications, including: Heart defects. Approximately half the children with Down syndrome are born with some type of heart defect. These heart problems can be life-threatening and may require surgery in early infancy.; Leukemia. Young children with Down syndrome are more likely to develop leukemia than are other children.; Infectious diseases. Because of abnormalities in their immune systems, those with Down syndrome are much more susceptible to infectious diseases, such as pneumonia.; Dementia. Later in life, people with Down syndrome have a greatly increased risk of dementia. Signs and symptoms of dementia often appear before age 40 in...

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Also known as Down's Syndrome, Downs Syndrome, Trisomy 21, Mongolism, trisomy 21 syndrome, Meiotic Nondisjunction Trisomy 21, Mitotic Nondisjunction Trisomy 21
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Down Syndrome information from trusted sources:

Down syndrome - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Down syndrome, or Down's syndrome (primarily in the United Kingdom), trisomy 21, or trisomy G, is a chromosomal disorder caused by the presence of all or ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Down Syndrome

Down syndrome was first described in 1866. The cause of Down syndrome (trisomy 21) was discovered in 1959. Down syndrome is relatively well known, with distinctive characteristics such as mental retardation, distinguishing facial features, and other traits. In the United States, Down syndrome occurs in 1 in 800 live births, and approximately 6000 children are born with Down syndrome each year. About 85% of infants with Down syndrome survive 1 year, and 50% of people with Down syndrome live longer than 50 years.

Down Syndrome

2 National Down Syndrome Congress. (n.d.). Facts about Down syndrome. ... 3 National Down Syndrome Society. (n.d.) Down syndrome fact sheet. ...

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Down Syndrome and Your Unborn Baby -- familydoctor.org

Aug 15, 2000 ... Information about what you need to know about Down syndrome during pregnancy from the American Academy of Family Physicians.

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National Down Syndrome Society - Down Syndrome Fact Sheet

Down syndrome is the most commonly occurring chromosomal condition. ... There are more than 400000 people living with Down syndrome in the United States . ...

Read more on www.ndss.org

Down Syndrome

Down syndrome is a genetic condition in which a person has 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Trisomy 21: The Origin of Down Syndrome

A description of Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) by Len Leshin, MD, FAAP.

Read more on www.ds-health.com

Down Syndrome: eMedicine Ophthalmology

May 3, 2010 ... Overview: Down syndrome is the trisomy of chromosome 21. This is the most common trisomy among live births. The syndrome was named after ...

Read more on emedicine.medscape.com

Risk Factors for Down Syndrome-Population-Based Case-Control Study ...

Information on Down Syndrome. Provided by the US Centers for Disease Control & Prevention.

Read more on www.cdc.gov

Down Syndrome

This leaflet is designed to help people who have Down's syndrome, ... One of the biggest problems for many people with Down's syndrome is the ...

Read more on www.stutteringhelp.org

Contents

Causes
Human cells normally contain 23 pairs of chromosomes. One chromosome in each pair comes from your father, the other from your mother.

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Coping and support
When you learn your child has Down syndrome, you may experience a gamut of emotions, including anger, fear, worry, sorrow and guilt. You may not know what to expect, and you may worry about your ability to care for a baby with a disability. The best antidote for fear and worry is information and support. Prepare yourself: Find a team of trusted professionals. You'll need to make important decisions about your child's education and treatment. Build a team of doctors, teachers and therapists you trust. These professionals can help evaluate the resources in your area and help explain state and federal programs for children with disabilities.; Seek out other families who are dealing with the...

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Exams and Tests
A doctor can often make an initial diagnosis of Down syndrome at birth based on how the baby looks. The doctor may hear a heart murmur when listening to the baby's chest with a stethoscope.

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Medical advice
A health care provider should be consulted to determine if the child needs special education and training. It is important for the child to have regular check ups with his or her doctor.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
Persons with Down syndrome are living longer than ever before. Although many children have physical and mental limitations, they can live independent and productive lives well into adulthood.

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Possible Complications
Airway blockage during sleep; Compression injury of the spinal cord; Endocarditis; Eye problems; Frequent ear infections and increased risk of other infections; Hearing loss; Heart problems; Gastrointestinal blockage; Weakness of the back bones at the top of the neck

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Prevention
There's no way to prevent Down syndrome. However, if you're at high risk of having a child with Down syndrome or you already have one child with Down syndrome, you may wish to consult a genetic counselor before becoming pregnant.

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Risk factors
Some parents have a greater risk of having a baby with Down syndrome. Risk factors include: Advancing maternal age. A woman's chances of giving birth to a child with Down syndrome increase with age because older eggs have a greater risk of improper chromosome division. By age 35, a woman's risk of conceiving a child with Down syndrome is 1 in 400. By age 45, the risk is 1 in 35. However, most children with Down syndrome are actually born to women under age 35 because younger women have far more babies.; Having had one child with Down syndrome. Typically, a woman who has one child with Down syndrome has about a 1 percent chance of having another child with Down syndrome.; Being carriers of...

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Support Groups
National Down Syndrome Society - www.ndss.org

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Symptoms
Children with Down syndrome have a distinct facial appearance. Though not all children with Down syndrome have the same features, some of the more common features are: Flattened facial features; Protruding tongue; Small head; Upward slanting eyes, unusual for the child's ethnic group; Unusually shaped ears

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Tests and diagnosis
Screening for Down syndrome is offered as a routine part of prenatal care. A mother's age has traditionally been a factor in the decision to screen for Down syndrome. But now, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends offering various screening tests for Down syndrome to all pregnant women, regardless of age. Your health care provider can help you weigh the pros and cons of these tests for you.

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Treatments and drugs
Early intervention for infants and children with Down syndrome can make a difference in realizing their potential abilities and in their quality of life.

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