ectopicpregnancy

What is Ectopic Pregnancy?


An ectopic pregnancy happens when a fertilized egg gets stuck on its way to the uterus often because the fallopian tube is scarred, damaged or misshapen. Sometimes, the specific cause of an ectopic pregnancy remains a mystery.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Also known as tubal pregnancy, Ectopic Pregnancies, pregnancy, ectopic, Ovarian Pregnancy, Ovarian Pregnancies
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Ectopic Pregnancy

You're pregnant and expect to be changing diapers one day. Then, suddenly, the pregnancy is over. Whatever name it is called - miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, stillbirth - you lost your baby. Pregnancy loss can happen in different ways. With a miscarriage, pregnancy suddenly ends before 20 weeks. It usually happens because of genetic problems in the fetus. An ectopic pregnancy occurs outside the uterus and the fetus cannot survive. In a molar pregnancy, a mass or growth forms inside the uterus at the beginning of a pregnancy, often there is no fetus. After 20 weeks, losing a pregnancy is called stillbirth.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Ectopic Pregnancy

If you think that you are pregnant, a urine test will confirm whether or not an egg has been fertilised, but it cannot determine whether it has implanted in your womb, or elsewhere.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Ectopic Pregnancy

An ectopic pregnancy is a pregnancy that develops outside a woman's uterus (womb). This happens when the fertilized egg from the ovary does not implant itself normally in the uterus. Instead, the egg develops somewhere else in the abdomen. The products of this conception are abnormal and cannot develop into fetuses. The most common place that ectopic pregnancy occurs is in one of the fallopian tubes (a so-called tubal pregnancy). These are the tubes that transport the egg from the ovary to the uterus. Ectopic pregnancies also can be found on the outside of the uterus, on the ovaries, or attached to the bowel. The most serious complication of an ectopic pregnancy is intra-abdominal hemorrhage (severe bleeding). In the case of a tubal pregnancy, for example, as the products of conception continue to grow in the fallopian tube, the tube expands and eventually ruptures. This can be very dangerous because a large artery runs on the outside of each fallopian tube. If the artery ruptures, you can bleed severely. Ectopic pregnancy is usually found in the first 5-10 weeks of pregnancy.

Ectopic Pregnancy

Pregnancy begins with a fertilized egg. Normally, the fertilized egg attaches itself to the lining of the uterus. With an ectopic pregnancy, the fertilized egg implants somewhere else.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Ectopic Pregnancy

Ectopic pregnancy is pregnancy where a fertilized egg grows outside of the uterus (womb). Normally, an egg cell fertilized by a sperm cell attaches and grows into a baby inside the uterus. In ectopic pregnancy, the egg does not attach (implant) inside the uterus and grows somewhere else. The most common place for this to happen is in the fallopian tube (tubal pregnancy). It can also implant on the outside of the uterus, on the ovary or cervix, or in the abdomen (stomach). These parts of the body cannot support a growing baby. This is a serious condition that usually causes loss of the baby, and may cause bleeding in the abdomen, damage to organs, and death of the mother.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Ectopic Pregnancy

In an ectopic pregnancy, a fertilized egg has implanted outside the uterus, usually in the fallopian tubes. If undiagnosed, as the pregnancy grows, ...

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Ectopic pregnancy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

An ectopic pregnancy, or eccysis, is a complication of pregnancy in which the pregnancy implants outside the uterine cavity. With rare exceptions, ectopic ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Ectopic Pregnancy - Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and ...

May 21, 2009 ... Ectopic pregnancy - In about 2% of pregnancies, the fertilized egg attaches to an area outside of the uterus, which results in an ectopic ...

Read more on www.webmd.com

Ectopic Pregnancy Symptoms, Signs, Testing, and Treatment (Tubal ...

Mar 10, 2011 ... An ectopic pregnancy (EP) is a condition in which a fertilized egg settles and grows in any location other than the inner lining of the ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com

Ectopic Pregnancy: eMedicine Obstetrics and Gynecology

Overview: Ectopic pregnancy presents a major health problem for women of childbearing age. It is the result of a flaw in human reproductive physiology that ...

Read more on emedicine.medscape.com

Contents

Complications
To avoid complications, it is important that an ectopic pregnancy is diagnosed as early as possible. If you have an ectopic pregnancy, and it is not treated quickly, you may experience severe internal bleeding. This can lead to shock and, in an extremely small number of cases, it can be fatal (less than 0.03%).

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Coping and support
Losing a pregnancy is devastating, even if you've only known about it for a few days. Recognize the loss, and give yourself time to grieve. Talk about your feelings and allow yourself to experience them fully. Lean on your partner, family and friends for support.

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Diagnosis
If you think that you are pregnant, a urine test will confirm whether or not an egg has been fertilised, but it cannot determine whether it has implanted in your womb, or elsewhere.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Exams and Tests
The health care provider will do a pelvic exam, which may show tenderness in the pelvic area.

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Medical advice
Seek emergency care if you experience any signs or symptoms of an ectopic pregnancy, including: Vaginal bleeding; Lower abdominal pain; Dizziness; Lightheadedness

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Outlook (Prognosis)
Most women who have had one ectopic pregnancy are later able to have a normal pregnancy. A repeated ectopic pregnancy may occur in 10 - 20% of women. Some women do not become pregnant again.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Possible Complications
The most common complication is rupture with internal bleeding that leads to shock. Death from rupture is rare. Infertility occurs in 10 - 15% of women who have had an ectopic pregnancy.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Prevention
There is nothing you can do to prevent an ectopic pregnancy from occurring, but you can prevent one of the major risk factors - pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).

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Risk factors
Up to an estimated 20 in every 1,000 pregnancies are ectopic. Various factors are associated with ectopic pregnancy, including: Previous ectopic pregnancy. If you've had one ectopic pregnancy, you're more likely to have another. Inflammation or infection. Up to 50 percent of women with ectopic pregnancies have had inflammation of the fallopian tube (salpingitis) or an infection of the uterus, fallopian tubes or ovaries (pelvic inflammatory disease). Gonorrhea or chlamydia can cause tubal problems that increase the risk of ectopic pregnancy. A condition that causes the tissue that normally lines the uterus to develop outside the uterus (endometriosis) also may increase the risk of ectopic...

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Symptoms
An ectopic pregnancy may seem like a normal pregnancy at first. You'll have a positive pregnancy test. Early signs and symptoms may be the same as those of any pregnancy a missed period, breast tenderness, nausea and fatigue.

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Treatments and drugs
A fertilized egg can't develop normally outside the uterus. To prevent life-threatening complications, the ectopic tissue must be removed.

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