eeg

What is EEG?


Around 20 electrodes (small metal discs) usually silver coated are attached to the scalp and kept in good electrical contact using conductive electrode jelly in specific positions. The person will usually be lying down or sitting relaxed in a chair.

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Also known as Electroencephalography, Electroencephalogram, Electroencephalograms, brain wave test
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EEG

An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a painless procedure that uses small, flat metal discs (electrodes) attached to your scalp to detect electrical activity in your brain. Your brain cells communicate via electrical impulses and are active all the time, even when you're asleep. This activity shows up as wavy lines on an EEG recording.

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EEG

If, after having an EEG, the result is negative, it means that the test showed that you had a normal pattern of brain activity. Many EEGs will have a negative result because it is sometimes difficult to record the times when your brain activity is abnormal. For example, people who have epilepsy will often have a negative EEG result because their brain activity only alters during an epileptic fit. This is why further EEG testing may have to be carried out, such as ambulatory EEG or video-telemetry, to help doctors record your brain activity while you are actually having a seizure.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

EEG

An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test to detect problems in the electrical activity of the brain.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Electroencephalography

The electroencephalogram (EEG) is a measure of brain waves. It is a readily available test that provides evidence of how the brain functions over time. The EEG is used in the evaluation of brain disorders. Most commonly it is used to show the type and location of the activity in the brain during a seizure. It also is used to evaluate people who are having problems associated with brain function. These problems might include confusion, coma, tumors, long-term difficulties with thinking or memory, or weakening of specific parts of the body (such as weakness associated with a stroke).An EEG is also used to determine brain death. It may be used to prove that someone on life-support equipment has no chance of recovery.Scientists first captured and recorded brain waves in dogs in 1912. By the 1950s the EEG was used commonly throughout the United States.

Electroencephalography - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Electroencephalography (EEG) is the recording of electrical activity along the scalp produced by the firing of neurons within the brain. ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Electroencephalogram (EEG) Test to Measure Brain Electrical Activity

Jul 29, 2008 ... An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test that measures and records the electrical activity of your brain by using sensors (electrodes) ...

Read more on www.webmd.com

EEG (Electroencephalogram)

Is your child scheduled to have an EEG? Find out how this test is performed and when you can expect the results.

Read more on kidshealth.org

EEG definition - Medical Dictionary definitions of popular medical ...

Mar 10, 2011 ... EEG: Electroencephalogram, e technique for studying the electrical current within the brain. Electrodes are attached to the scalp. ...

Read more on www.medterms.com

Electroencephalogram (EEG) Procedure (Test) Information on ...

Mar 11, 2011 ... Read about electroencephalogram (EEG), a procedure that can help diagnose epilepsy and other neurological disorders. Information on how to ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com

Electroencephalograms (EEG)

The EEG records the ever-present, ongoing electrical activity generated by the neurons in the brain, hence it is also referred to as a "brain wave" test. ...

Contents

How the Test is Performed
Brain cells communicate with each other by producing tiny electrical impulses. In an EEG, this faint electrical activity is measured by putting electrodes on the scalp.

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How the Test Will Feel
This test causes no discomfort. Although having electrodes pasted onto your skin may feel strange, they only record activity and do not produce any sensation. No significant electricity passes from the electrode into your skin.

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How to Prepare for the Test
You will need to wash your hair the night before the test. Do not use any oils, sprays, or conditioner on your hair before this test.

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How you prepare
To prepare for an EEG: Wash your hair the night before or the day of the test, but don't use any conditioners, hair creams, sprays or styling gels.; Avoid anything with caffeine six hours before the test.; Take your usual medications unless instructed otherwise.

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Indications
EEG is used to help diagnose if you're having seizures and if so, what type. An EEG is also used to find the causes of confusion, and to evaluate head injuries, tumors, infections, degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, and abnormal changes in body chemistry that affect the brain.

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Normal Results
Brain electical activity has certain frequencies (the number of waves per second) that are normal for different levels of consciousness. For example, brain waves are faster when you are awake, and slower when you're sleeping. There are also normal patterns to these waves. These frequencies and patterns are what the EEG reader looks for.

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Results
If, after having an EEG, the result is negative, it means that the test showed that you had a normal pattern of brain activity. Many EEGs will have a negative result because it is sometimes difficult to record the times when your brain activity is abnormal. For example, people who have epilepsy will often have a negative EEG result because their brain activity only alters during an epileptic fit. This is why further EEG testing may have to be carried out, such as ambulatory EEG or video-telemetry, to help doctors record your brain activity while you are actually having a seizure.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Risks
The procedure is very safe. However, the flashing lights or fast breathing (hyperventilation) required during the test may trigger seizures in those with seizure disorders. The health care provider performing the EEG is trained to take care of you if this happens.

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What Abnormal Results Mean
Abnormal results on an EEG test may be due to:An abnormal structure in the brain (such as a brain tumor); Attention problems; Tissue death due to a blockage in blood flow (cerebral infarction); Drug or alcohol abuse; Head injury; Inflammation of the brain (encephalitis); Hemorrhage (abnormal bleeding caused by a ruptured blood vessel); Migraines (in some cases); Seizure disorder (such as epilepsy or convulsions); Sleep disorder (such as narcolepsy)

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What you can expect
During the test You'll feel little or no discomfort during an EEG. The electrodes don't transmit any sensations. They just record your brain waves. If you need to sleep during the EEG, you might be given a sedative beforehand to help you relax.

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Why it should be done
An electroencephalogram (EEG) is primarily used to help diagnose epilepsy. Epilepsy is a condition involving abnormal brain activity, which causes people to have seizures, known as epileptic fits. Epileptic fits occur when the nerve cells in your brain are unable to transmit messages effectively.

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Why it's done
An EEG can determine changes in brain activity that may be useful in diagnosing brain disorders, especially epilepsy. An EEG may be helpful to confirm, rule out or provide information that helps with management of the following disorders: Epilepsy or other seizure disorder; Brain tumor; Head injury; Encephalopathy diffuse brain dysfunction; Inflammation of the brain (encephalitis); Stroke; Sleep disorders; Memory impairment

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