foodadditives

What is food additives?


Intentional or direct food additives are added to foods to produce a desired effect, such as to maintain freshness, improve nutritional quality, assist in processing or preparing food, or make a food more appealing.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Also known as additives in food, artificial flavors and color
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food additives information from trusted sources:

Food Additives

Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when added (intentionally or unintentionally) during the processing or production of that food. Common food additives include: Monosodium glutamate (MSG) Artificial sweeteners such as Aspartame, saccharine, and sodium cyclamate Antioxidants in oily or fatty foods Benzoic acid in fruit juices Sulfites in beer, wine, and packaged vegetables Nitrates and nitrites in hot dogs and other meat products Antibiotics given to food producing animals Lecithin, gelatins, corn starch, waxes, gums, propylene glycol in food stabilizers and emulsifiers A number of different coloring agents

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Nutrition

Healthy eating is about maintaining a balanced diet. This means eating foods from all the different food groups in the right amounts.

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Food Allergy

The immune system is the body's way to protect itself from substances that it identifies as not its own. The immune system reacts to things that may cause disease, and fights them off. A food allergy happens when your immune system responds after you eat certain foods. Your body makes a mistake and thinks that a certain food is harmful. These foods may not bother other people.

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Food Allergy

Food allergy is an immune system reaction that occurs soon after eating a certain food. Even a tiny amount of the allergy-causing food can trigger signs and symptoms such as digestive problems, hives or swollen airways. In some people, a food allergy can cause severe symptoms or even a life-threatening reaction known as anaphylaxis.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Food Allergy

For someone with a food allergy, eating or swallowing even a tiny amount of a particular food can cause symptoms such as skin rash, nausea, vomiting, cramping, and diarrhea. Because the body is reacting to something that is otherwise harmless, this type of allergic reaction is often called a hypersensitivity reaction. Rarely, a severe allergic reaction can cause a life-threatening set of symptoms called anaphylaxis, or anaphylactic shock. Although about 25% of people believe they have a food allergy, only about 2.5% of adults and about 6-8% of children, mainly younger than 6 years, have true food allergies. The rest have what is known as food intolerancean undesirable reaction to a food that does not involve the immune system.

Food additive - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Food additives are substances added to food to preserve flavor or enhance its taste and appearance. Some additives have been used for centuries; ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Food Additives

Oct 21, 2010 ... Links to Information about Food Additives and Food Additive Petitions.

Read more on www.fda.gov

WHO | Food additives

Food additives are substances that are added to food or animal feed during processing or storage. They include antioxidants, preservatives, colouring and ...

Read more on www.who.int

Food Additives - About AAFA

Many people believe that food additives cause most food reactions. In fact, natural foods cause most reactions. Studies have found, though, ...

Read more on www.aafa.org

Food Poisoning

An imprecise term indicating an illness resulting from the ingestion of foods containing poisonous substances. True food poisoning includes mushroom poisoning, shellfish poisoning, poisoning resulting from foods contaminated with poisonous insecticides or toxic substances such as lead or mercury, and milk sickness (due to milk from cows that have fed on certain poisonous plants). Also, occasionally poisoning resulting from eating foods that have undergone putrefaction or decomposition or poisoning from bacteria. The actual number of food poisoning cases is undetermined (guessed at 2 million per year) because most people mistake the symptoms of food poisoning for intestinal flu.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com

Contents

Function
Food additives serve five main functions...

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Recommendations
The FDA and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) supervise and regulate the use of additives in products sold in the United States. However, people who have special diets or intolerances should be careful in selecting products in the grocery store.

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Side Effects
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has a list of food additives generally recognized as safe. Many have not undergone any testing, but they are regarded as safe by the scientific community. These substances are put on the GRAS list, which contains approximately 700 items. Examples of some of the items on this list are: guar gum, sugar, salt, and vinegar. The list is evaluated on an ongoing basis.

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