foodallergy

What is food allergy?


In a true food allergy, your immune system mistakenly identifies a specific food or a substance in food as a harmful substance. Your immune system triggers cells to release antibodies known as immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies to fight the culprit food or food substance (the allergen). The next time you eat even the smallest amount of that food, the IgE antibodies sense it and signal your immune system to release a chemical called histamine, as well as other chemicals, into your bloodstream.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Also known as Food Allergies, peanut allergy, milk allergy, nut allergy, allergy, food, Food Hypersensitivity, allergy to food, Food Hypersensitivities
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food allergy information from trusted sources:

Allergy, food

Food allergy is an abnormal response to a food triggered by your body's immune system. Allergic reactions to food can sometimes cause serious illness and death. Tree nuts and peanuts are the leading causes of deadly allergic reactions called anaphylaxis. In adults, the foods that most often trigger allergic reactions include

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Food Allergy

Food allergy is an immune system reaction that occurs soon after eating a certain food. Even a tiny amount of the allergy-causing food can trigger signs and symptoms such as digestive problems, hives or swollen airways. In some people, a food allergy can cause severe symptoms or even a life-threatening reaction known as anaphylaxis.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Food Allergy

For someone with a food allergy, eating or swallowing even a tiny amount of a particular food can cause symptoms such as skin rash, nausea, vomiting, cramping, and diarrhea. Because the body is reacting to something that is otherwise harmless, this type of allergic reaction is often called a hypersensitivity reaction. Rarely, a severe allergic reaction can cause a life-threatening set of symptoms called anaphylaxis, or anaphylactic shock. Although about 25% of people believe they have a food allergy, only about 2.5% of adults and about 6-8% of children, mainly younger than 6 years, have true food allergies. The rest have what is known as food intolerancean undesirable reaction to a food that does not involve the immune system.

Food Allergy

The immune system is the body's way to protect itself from substances that it identifies as not its own. The immune system reacts to things that may cause disease, and fights them off. A food allergy happens when your immune system responds after you eat certain foods. Your body makes a mistake and thinks that a certain food is harmful. These foods may not bother other people.

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Food Allergy

If you suspect that you or your child has a food allergy, see your GP straight away. Your GP will ask you questions to find out whether a food allergy is likely. They may also ask about the type of reaction or reactions you or your child have had, how soon after eating the food they occurred, whether they occur only with cooked or raw foods and how long you or your child have been experiencing the symptoms. Your doctor will also want to know whether there are symptoms of other allergies – such as asthma or hayfever – or whether these allergies are common in your family.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network

Nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing about a clearer understanding of the issues surrounding food allergies and providing helpful resources.

Read more on www.foodallergy.org

Food Allergy (Allergies) Symptoms, Signs, Diagnosis, Treatment and ...

Mar 10, 2011 ... Either food allergy or food intolerance affects nearly everyone at some point. When people have an unpleasant reaction to something they ate ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com

Food allergy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A food allergy is an adverse immune response to a food protein. They are distinct from other adverse responses to food, such as food intolerance, ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

AAAAI - Patients & Consumers Center: Tips to Remember: Food allergy

If you have a food allergy, your immune system overreacts to a food. This is caused by an antibody called IgE (Immunoglobulin E), which is found in people ...

Read more on www.aaaai.org

Food Allergy Guidelines

Mar 15, 2006 ... These food allergy guidelines stress smart testing and smart eating.

Read more on www.webmd.com

Contents

Alternative medicine
Research on alternative food allergy treatments is limited. However, many people do try them and claim that certain treatments help.

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Complications
Complications of food allergy can include: Anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction. Atopic dermatitis (eczema). About one in three people with atopic dermatitis also have a food allergy. Migraines. Histamines, released by your immune system during an allergic reaction, have been shown to trigger migraines in some people.

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Coping and support
A food allergy can be challenging and a source of ongoing concern. Having a good source of information and the opportunity to discuss the condition with others who share your concerns can be very helpful. A number of Internet sites and nonprofit organizations offer information and forums for discussing food allergies. Some are specifically for parents of children with food allergies.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Diagnosis
If you suspect that you or your child has a food allergy, see your GP straight away. Your GP will ask you questions to find out whether a food allergy is likely. They may also ask about the type of reaction or reactions you or your child have had, how soon after eating the food they occurred, whether they occur only with cooked or raw foods and how long you or your child have been experiencing the symptoms. Your doctor will also want to know whether there are symptoms of other allergies – such as asthma or hayfever – or whether these allergies are common in your family.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Exams and Tests
In severe reactions, you may have low blood pressure and blocked airways.

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Lifestyle and home remedies
One of the keys to preventing an allergic reaction is to completely avoid the food that causes your symptoms.

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Medical advice
Call your local emergency number, such as 911, if you have any serious or whole-body reactions (particularly wheezing or difficulty breathing) after eating a food. If your doctor prescribed epinephrine for severe reactions, inject it as soon as possible, even BEFORE calling 911. The sooner you inject the epinephrine, the better. Anyone who has had an allergic reaction to a food should be evaluated by an allergy specialist.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
Avoiding the offending foods may be easy if the food is uncommon or easily identified. However, you may need to severely restrict your diet, carefully read all package ingredients, and ask detailed questions when eating away from home.

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Possible Complications
Anaphylaxis is a severe, whole-body allergic reaction that is life-threatening. Although people with oral allergy syndrome rarely have an anaphylactic reaction, they should ask their doctor whether they need to carry injectable epinephrine.

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Preparing for your appointment
Because appointments can be brief, and because there's often a lot of ground to cover, it's a good idea to be well prepared for your appointment. Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment, and what to expect from your doctor.

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Prevention
The best way to prevent an allergic reaction is to know and avoid foods that cause signs and symptoms. For some people, this is a mere inconvenience, but others find it a greater hardship. Also some foods when used as ingredients in certain dishes may be well hidden. This is especially true in restaurants and in other social settings.

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Risk factors
Food allergy risk factors include: Family history. You're at increased risk of food allergies if asthma, eczema, hives or allergies, such as hay fever, are common in your family. A past food allergy. Children may outgrow a food allergy, but in some cases it returns later in life. Other allergies. If you're already allergic to one food, you may be at increased risk of becoming allergic to another. Likewise, having another type of allergy, such as hay fever, increases your risk of having a food allergy. Age. Food allergies are most common in children, especially toddlers and infants. As you grow older, your digestive system matures and your body is less likely to absorb food or food components...

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Support Groups
Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network -- www.foodallergy.org

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Symptoms
For some people, an allergic reaction to a particular food may be uncomfortable but not severe. For other people, an allergic food reaction can be frightening and even life-threatening. Food allergy symptoms usually develop within a few minutes to an hour after eating the offending food.

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Treatment
There is no cure for a food allergy. However, it can be successfully managed by completely eliminating the culprit food from your diet.

Read more on www.nhs.uk