gestationaltrophoblasticneoplasms

What is gestational trophoblastic neoplasms?


Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) refers to a group of abnormalities in which tumors grow inside a woman's uterus (womb). The abnormal cells start in the tissue that would normally become the placenta, the organ that develops during pregnancy to feed the fetus. A baby may or may not develop during these types of pregnancies. There are several types of GTD. They include: Choriocarcinoma (a type of cancer) Hydatiform mole (also called a molar pregnancy)

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Gestational diabetes

Gestational (jes-TAY-shun-al) diabetes (deye-ah-BEE-teez) is also called gestational diabetes mellitus or GDM. It is a form of diabetes that may develop during pregnancy, usually in the second or third trimester. GDM happens when the pregnant woman's body cannot make enough insulin. Insulin helps your body use glucose (sugar). Decreased amount of insulin results in high blood sugar levels in the body.

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Total beta hCG

To confirm and monitor pregnancy or to help diagnose and monitor trophoblastic disease or germ cell tumors

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Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia: eMedicine Obstetrics and ...

Mar 16, 2010 ... Overview: Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) can be benign or malignant. Histologically, it is classified into hydatidiform mole, ...

Read more on emedicine.medscape.com

Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor

Gestational trophoblastic tumor, a rare cancer in women, is a disease in which cancer (malignant) cells grow in the tissues that are formed following ...

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Gestational trophoblastic disease - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

High-risk gestational trophoblastic neoplasia at Gujarat Cancer and .... Trophoblastic neoplasm: Gestational trophoblastic disease (Hydatidiform mole) ...

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Gestational Trophoblastic Tumors Treatment (PDQ®) - National ...

Jun 26, 2008 ... To Learn More About Gestational Trophoblastic Tumors ... Gestational trophoblastic tumor, a rare cancer in women, is a disease in which ...

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Gestational Trophoblastic Tumors

Aug 2, 2010 ... What are gestational trophoblastic tumors? Gestational trophoblastic tumor,a rare cancer in women,is a disease in which cancer (malignant) ...

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Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia--pathogenesis and potential ...

by IM Shih - 2007 - Cited by 50 - Related articles

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What is gestational trophoblastic disease?

Aug 24, 2010 ... Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is a group of rare tumors that ... trophoblastic tumors, or gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. ...

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Gestational trophoblastic neoplasms

A US Department of Health and Human Service project providing information on genetic and rare diseases. A comprehensive body of resources on Gestational ...

Contents

Choriocarcinoma
Choriocarcinoma is a quick-growing form of cancer that occurs in a woman's uterus (womb). The abnormal cells start in the tissue that would normally become the placenta, the organ that develops during pregnancy to feed the fetus. Choriocarcinoma is a type of gestational trophoblastic disease. See also: Gestational trophoblastic disease Hydatiform mole

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Hydatidiform mole
A hydatidiform mole is a rare mass or growth that forms inside the uterus at the beginning of a pregnancy. It is a type of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD). See also: Gestational trophoblastic disease Choriocarcinoma (a cancerous form of GTD)

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Molar pregnancy
After a molar pregnancy has been removed, molar tissue may remain and continue to grow. This is called persistent gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD). It occurs in about 10 percent of women after a molar pregnancy usually after a complete mole rather than a partial mole. One sign of persistent GTD is an HCG level that remains high after the molar pregnancy has been removed. In some cases, an invasive mole penetrates deep into the middle layer of the uterine wall, which causes vaginal bleeding. Persistent GTD can nearly always be successfully treated, most often with chemotherapy. Another treatment option is removal of the uterus (hysterectomy).

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Prostin E2
PROSTIN E2 Vaginal Suppository, an oxytocic, contains dinoprostone as the naturally occurring prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). PROSTIN E2 Vaginal Suppository is indicated for the termination of pregnancy from the 12th through the 20th gestational week as calculated from the first day of the last normal menstrual period. PROSTIN E2 is also indicated for evacuation of the uterine contents in the management of missed abortion or intrauterine fetal death up to 28 weeks of gestational age as calculated from the first day of the last normal menstrual period. PROSTIN E2 is indicated in the management of nonmetastatic gestational trophoblastic disease (benign hydatidiform mole).

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Pregnancy ultrasound
Abnormal ultrasound results may be due to some of the following conditions:Birth defects, Ectopic pregnancy , Intrauterine growth retardation , Multiple pregnancies, Miscarriage, Problems with the baby's position in the womb, Problems with the placenta, including placenta previa and placental abruption, Too little amniotic fluid, Too much amniotic fluid ( polyhydramnios), Tumors of pregnancy, including gestational trophoblastic disease, Other problems with the ovaries, uterus, and remaining...

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Neoplasms
Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.

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Gestational age
Gestation is the period of time between conception and birth during which the fetus grows and develops inside the mother's womb. Gestational age is the time measured from the first day of the woman's last menstrual cycle to the current date. It is measured in weeks. A normal pregnancy can range from 38 to 42 weeks. Infants born before 37 weeks are considered premature. Infants born after 42 weeks are considered postmature. The gestational maturity rating is measured by the Ballard scale or Dubowitz exam.

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Gestational diabetes
Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that occurs only during pregnancy. Like other forms of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects the way your body uses sugar (glucose) your body's main source of fuel. Gestational diabetes can cause high blood sugar levels that are unlikely to cause problems for you, but can threaten the health of your unborn baby.

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Pregnancy and Diabetes
Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or sugar, levels are too high. When you are pregnant, too much glucose is not good for your baby. Out of every 100 pregnant women in the United States, between three and eight get gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that happens for the first time when a woman is pregnant. Gestational diabetes goes away when you have your baby, but it does increase your risk for having diabetes later. If you already have diabetes before you get pregnant, you need to monitor and control your blood sugar levels.

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Toxemia
If you are pregnant, high blood pressure can cause problems for you and your unborn baby. You may have had high blood pressure before you got pregnant. Or you may get it once you are pregnant – a condition called gestational hypertension. Whichever you have, it can cause low birth weight or premature delivery of the baby. Serious cases may develop preeclampsia, a sudden increase in blood pressure after the 20th week of pregnancy. It can be life-threatening for both you and the unborn baby. Treatments for high blood pressure in pregnancy may include close monitoring of the baby, lifestyle changes and certain medicines. For preeclampsia, early delivery of the baby may be necessary.

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Diabetes diet - gestational
Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar (glucose) that starts or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. Pregnant women with gestational diabetes tend to have larger babies at birth. This can increase the chance of problems at the time of delivery. This article discusses the diet recommendations for women with gestational diabetes who do NOT take insulin.

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