gingivitis

What is gingivitis?


Gingivitis almost always begins with plaque. This invisible, sticky film is composed mainly of bacteria. Plaque forms on your teeth when starches and sugars in food interact with bacteria normally found in your mouth. Brushing your teeth removes plaque. But plaque re-forms quickly, usually within 24 hours.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Search for any health
topic on HealthMash:

Explore and Discover

Alternative Medicine

gingivitis information from trusted sources:

Gingivitis

Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums surrounding the teeth. Gingivitis is one of many periodontal diseases that affect the health of the periodontium (those tissues that surround the teeth and include the gums, soft tissues, and bone). Periodontal diseases are often classified according to their severity. They range from mild gingivitis, to more severe periodontitis, and finally acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, which can be life threatening.

Gingivitis

Gingivitis is inflammation of the gums (gingiva).

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Gingivitis

Gingivitis is a very common and mild form of gum (periodontal) disease that causes swelling (inflammation) of your gums. Because gingivitis can be so mild, you may not be aware that you have the condition. But it's important to take gingivitis seriously and get it treated because it can lead to much more serious gum disease.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Gingivitis

Gingivitis (jin-jih-vi-tis) is swelling and redness of gums that are infected. It is an early sign of gum disease. Taking good care of your teeth may keep gingivitis from getting worse. You are at a higher risk for getting gingivitis if you have diabetes or are pregnant. Risk also is greater if you have an infection, a blood disorder, or leukemia.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Gum disease

Gingivitis (often referred to as gum disease) causes your gums to become red, inflamed and swollen. It can cause your gums to bleed when you brush your teeth.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Gum disease

Any abnormality, inflammatory or degenerative, of the tissue around a tooth. (Periodontal means "located around a tooth") The term refers to any disorder of the gums or other supporting structures of the teeth. Periodontitis is the inflammation or degeneration, or both, of the dental periosteum, alveolar bone, cementum, and adjacent gingiva. Suppuration ususally occurs, supporting bone is resorbed, teeth become loose, and recession of gingivae occurs. Usually follows chronic gingivitis, Vincent's infection, or poor dental hygiene.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com

Gingivitis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gingivitis ("inflammation of the gum tissue") is a term used to describe non-destructive periodontal disease. The most common form of gingivitis is in ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Gum Disease (Gingivitis and Periodontitis) Symptoms, Treatments ...

Learn about gum disease, also called gingivitis and periodontal disease.

Read more on www.webmd.com

Gingivitis: eMedicine Emergency Medicine

Apr 12, 2010 ... Overview: Gingivitis is an inflammatory process limited to the mucosal epithelial tissue surrounding the cervical portion of the teeth and ...

Read more on emedicine.medscape.com

Information on Gingivitis from the American Academy of Periodontology

Jun 25, 2010 ... Gingivitis is the mildest form of periodontal (gum) disease and is often caused by inadequate oral hygiene, which leads to plaque buildup.

Read more on www.perio.org

Contents

Complications
Untreated gingivitis can progress to periodontitis, a much more serious form of gum disease. Periodontitis can cause tooth loss and may even increase your risk of heart attack and stroke. What's more, women with periodontitis are far more likely to give birth to premature babies than are women with healthy gums.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Exams and Tests
The dentist will examine your mouth and teeth and look for soft, swollen, red-purple gums. Deposits of plaque and tartar may be seen at the base of the teeth. The gums are usually painless or mildly tender.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Lifestyle and home remedies
You can take steps at home to help reduce or control gingivitis, such as: Get regular professional dental cleanings, on a schedule recommended by your dentist.; Use a soft toothbrush and replace it at least every three to four months.; Consider using an electric toothbrush, which may be more effective at removing plaque and tartar.; Brush your teeth twice a day, or better yet, after every meal or snack.; Floss daily.; Use a mouth rinse to help reduce plaque between your teeth.; Use an interdental cleaner, such as a dental pick or dental stick specially designed to clean between your teeth.; Don't rely on tartar-control toothpaste to do the job that brushing and flossing should.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Medical advice
Call your dentist if symptoms of gingivitis are present, especially if you have not had a routine cleaning and examination in the last 6 months.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Outlook (Prognosis)
The removal of plaque from inflamed gums may be uncomfortable. Bleeding and tenderness of the gums should lessen within 1 or 2 weeks after professional cleaning and careful oral hygiene. Warm salt water or antibacterial rinses can reduce the puffiness. Over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications will ease any discomfort from a rigorous cleaning.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Possible Complications
Recurrence of gingivitis Periodontitis Infection or abscess of the gingiva or the jaw bones Trench mouth

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Preparing for your appointment
If you notice any symptoms of gingivitis, make an appointment with your dentist. Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment, and what to expect from your dentist.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Prevention
The best way to prevent gingivitis is a program of good dental hygiene, one that you begin early and practice consistently throughout life. That means brushing your teeth at least twice daily in the morning and before going to bed and flossing at least once a day. Better yet, brush after every meal or snack or as your dentist recommends. A complete cleaning with a toothbrush and floss should take three to five minutes. Flossing before you brush allows you to clean away the loosened food particles and bacteria.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Risk factors
Factors that can increase the risk of gingivitis include: Poor oral health habits; Tobacco use; Diabetes; Older age; Decreased immunity, such as that occurring with leukemia or HIV/AIDS; Certain medications; Certain viral and fungal infections; Dry mouth; Hormonal changes, such as those related to pregnancy; Poor nutrition; Substance abuse; Ill-fitting dental restorations

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Symptoms
Signs and symptoms of gingivitis may include: Swollen gums; Soft gums; Occasionally, tender gums; Gums that bleed easily when brushing or flossing; Bad breath; A change in the color of your gums from a healthy pink to dusky red

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Tests and diagnosis
Diagnosis of gingivitis is generally simple. Diagnosis is based on your description of symptoms and an exam of your mouth and tongue. Your dentist will look for plaque and tartar buildup and may check for easy bleeding.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Treatments and drugs
There are several ways to treat gingivitis, including: A thorough dental cleaning; Antiseptic mouth rinse; Brushing; Flossing; Fixing dental restorations, if necessary

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com