herniaofunspecifiedsitewithoutmentionofobstructionorgangrene

What is hernia of unspecified site without mention of obstruction or gangrene?


A hernia occurs when part of an organ (usually the intestines) sticks through a weak point or tear in the thin muscular wall that holds the abdominal organs in place. There are several types of hernias, based on where they occur: Inguinal hernia appears as a bulge in the groin or scrotum. This type is more common in men than women. Femoral hernia appears as a bulge in the upper thigh. This type is more common in women than in men. Incisional hernia can occur through a scar if you have had abdominal surgery. Umbilical hernia appears as a bulge around the belly button. It occurs when the muscle around the navel doesn't close completely.

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hernia of unspecified site without mention of obstruction or gangrene information from trusted sources:

Gangrene

There are two types of gangrene, wet and dry. Dry gangrene has no bacterial infection involved. It is caused by the stopped or reduced flow of blood, which results in oxygen-deprived tissue. doesn't spread to other areas, but the flesh dies. It may be painful at first, but as the skin dies, it becomes numb and slowly darkens. All dry gangrene is caused by cutting off blood supply to tissue. Most often occurs in feet and hands, especially toes and fingers. Surgery may be performed to improve circulation (see a doctor). If the area has been injured the area becomes red, swollen, and painful. May develop an odor. Dull, aching pain and coldness are early signs. Wet gangrene is a result of a wound or injury that becomes infected. The infection prevents adequate venous drainage, depriving the area of needed blood supply. Careful hygiene usually can prevent this condition. Antibiotics and/or removal of dead tissue are usually necessary.

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Inguinal hernia

A hernia (HER-nee-ah) is when tissue or part of an organ bulges out of its normal place in the body. An inguinal (ING-gwih-nal) hernia, or groin hernia, is when something from the abdomen (belly) slips out of place. It is often a loop of intestine (bowel) that falls out of place and makes the hernia. Sometimes the hernia contains part of another organ, or other tissue from the abdomen (such as fat). Inguinal hernias happen most often in males, but females can have them also. There are two main types of inguinal hernias.Direct inguinal hernia: When part of the abdominal muscle wall becomes weak, tissue, intestine, or part of another organ may slip through. Most of the time, this kind of hernia causes a bulge in the groin area. The groin area is where the tops of the legs meet the abdomen.

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Ventral hernia without obstruction or g... Search Results From ...

Gangrene is the term used to describe the decay or death of an organ or tissue ... of unspecified site, unspecified as acute or chronic, without mention of ...

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Alt-n - Draft ICD-10-CM/PCS MS-DRGv28 Definitions Manual

D139, Benign neoplasm of ill-defined sites within the digestive system ... K469, Unspecified abdominal hernia without obstruction or gangrene ...

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CPT and ICD-9 Coding for Surgical Residents and New Surgeons in ...

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List of ICD-9 codes 520–579: diseases of the digestive system ...

(551) Other hernia of abdominal cavity, with gangrene; (552) Other hernia of abdominal cavity with obstruction, without mention; (553) Other hernia of ...

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Intestinal obstruction - Ehealthconnection | Health Information

Jul 11, 2008 ... Acute peptic ulcer of unspecified site without mention of hemorrhage ... and hernias) that are related to obstruction may reduce the risk. ...

Contents

Hernia
A hernia occurs when the contents of a body cavity bulge out of the area where they are normally contained. These contents, usually portions of intestine or abdominal fatty tissue, are enclosed in the thin membrane that naturally lines the inside of the cavity. Although the term hernia can be used for bulges in other areas, it most often is used to describe hernias of the lower torso (abdominal-wall hernias).

Inguinal hernia
A hernia is when an internal part of the body, such as an organ, pushes through a weakness in the muscle or surrounding tissue wall. Usually your muscles are strong and tight enough to keep your intestines and organs in place, but sometimes they aren't, causing a hernia.

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Enterocele
Childbirth and aging may weaken the muscles and ligaments (pelvic floor) that support your bladder, uterus, colon and small intestine. The weakening may cause one or more of these organs to drop (prolapse). One resulting condition is an enterocele.

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Gangrene
Gangrene is a medical term used to describe the death of an area of the body. It develops when the blood supply is cut off to the affected part as a result of various processes, such as infection, vascular (pertaining to blood vessels) disease, or trauma. Gangrene can involve any part of the body, the most common sites include the toes, fingers, feet, and hands.

Hernia exam
A hernia occurs when soft tissue usually part of the intestine protrudes through a weak point or tear in your abdominal wall. This bulging is most likely to occur when there's increased pressure on your abdomen, such as when lifting, straining, sneezing or coughing. Forcing a cough during a hernia exam causes your abdominal muscles to contract and increase pressure within your abdomen. This may force a hernia to bulge out, making it easier to detect during the examination.

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Hernia FAQs
If a person feels a lump in the abdomen, it could be a hernia. The lump may be soft, small, and painless, or it may feel a little painful and swollen. The lump might even be able to be pushed back in, only to pop out again later.

Hernia, hiatus
A hernia happens when an internal part of the body, such as an organ, pushes through a weakness in the surrounding muscle or tissue wall. Usually, your muscles are strong and tight enough to keep your intestines and organs in place, but sometimes they are not. This causes a hernia.

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without mention of heart failure
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National Guideline Clearinghouse | Hernia.
ICD9CM: Hernia of unspecified site without mention of obstruction or gangrene (553.8); Hernia of unspecified site without mention of obstruction or gangrene ...

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ICD-10: Block K40-K46
Includes: hernia: · abdominal, specified site NEC · lumbar · obturator · pudendal ... K46.9, Unspecified abdominal hernia without obstruction or gangrene ...

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Unilateral or unspecified inguinal hernia with gangrene (not ...
Jan 26, 2011 ... Next page: Unilateral or unspecified inguinal hernia with obstruction, without mention of gangrene (not specified as recurrent) ...

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