influenza

What is Influenza?


If you're young and healthy, influenza usually isn't serious. Although you may feel miserable while you have it, the flu usually goes away with no lasting effects. But high-risk children and adults may develop complications such as: Ear infections; Acute sinusitis; Bronchitis; Pneumonia; Encephalitis

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Also known as flu, the flu, Human Flu, Grippe, Human Influenza, Influenza in Humans, Influenzas
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Influenza information from trusted sources:

Flu

Flu is a respiratory infection caused by a number of viruses. The viruses pass through the air and enter your body through your nose or mouth. Between 5% and 20% of people in the U.S. get the flu each year. The flu can be serious or even deadly for elderly people, newborn babies and people with certain chronic illnesses. Symptoms of the flu come on suddenly and are worse than those of the common cold. They may include

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Influenza

Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system, including your nose, throat, bronchial tubes and lungs.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Flu

Seasonal flu (also known as influenza) is a highly infectious illness caused by a flu virus.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Influenza

The flu is an infection caused by a virus in the upper breathing passages that may also spread to the lungs. Symptoms include fever, headache, general aches and pains, and extreme exhaustion. The flu is a contagious disease in which the influenza virus is spread through the air by the coughing and sneezing of people who are already infected. The virus is inhaled into the lungs where it attacks tissues involved in breathing. People with the flu usually feel sick rather suddenly, with symptoms that may include fever, headache, and feeling very tired. These symptoms are sometimes followed by coughing and a stuffy or runny nose.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Influenza

The flu is a highly contagious respiratory viral infection. Spread easily by coughing, sneezing, and poor hygiene. Vaccines have been only partially effective because of new and different viral strains that are constantly changing.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com

Rapid flu test

To determine whether or not you have the influenza A or B, to help your doctor make rapid treatment decisions, and to help determine whether or not the flu has come to your community

Read more on www.labtestsonline.org

Flu, Swine

Influenza viruses are small RNA viruses that infect many mammals, including humans, birds, and swine. Before 2009, swine influenza predominately affected swine and was not transmitted often or easily to people. Even in the isolated instances in which swine influenza infected people, it had very limited ability to spread from person to person. Most cases were directly linked to contact with swine through farming or at fairs.

Contents

Causes
The flu virus is contained in the millions of tiny droplets that come out of the nose and mouth when someone coughs or sneezes.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Diagnosis
Healthy people with seasonal flu do not need to contact their GP as they will get better on their own by taking over-the-counter flu remedies, resting, and drinking plenty of fluids.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Lifestyle and home remedies
If you do come down with the flu, these measures may help ease your symptoms: Drink plenty of liquids. Choose water, juice and warm soups to prevent dehydration. Drink enough so that your urine is clear or pale yellow. Rest. Get more sleep to help your immune system fight infection. Try chicken soup. It's not just good for your soul it really can help relieve flu symptoms by breaking up congestion. Consider pain relievers. Use an over-the-counter pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) cautiously, as needed. Remember, pain relievers may make you more comfortable, but they won't make your symptoms go away any faster and may have side effects....

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Prevention
These steps can help you stay healthy, even at the height of flu season: Get an annual flu vaccination. The best time to be vaccinated is October or November. This allows your body time to develop antibodies to the flu virus before peak flu season, which in the Northern Hemisphere is usually December through March. However, getting a flu shot later in the flu season may still protect you. It takes up to two weeks to build immunity following a flu shot. Keep in mind that the flu vaccine doesn't offer complete protection, especially for older adults, but it can reduce the risk and severity of illness. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), when the match between...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Risk factors
You're at increased risk of influenza or its complications if you: Are an infant or young child; Are over age 50; Are a resident of a nursing home or other long term care facility; Have a chronic disorder, such as diabetes or heart, kidney or lung disease; Have a weakened immune system, such as from medications or HIV infection; Will be pregnant during flu season; Work in a health care facility where you're more likely to be exposed to the flu virus; Are in regular, close contact with infants or young children

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Symptoms
Initially, the flu may seem like a common cold with a runny nose, sneezing and sore throat. But colds usually develop slowly, whereas the flu tends to come on suddenly. And although a cold can be a nuisance, you usually feel much worse with the flu.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Treatment
If you are otherwise fit and healthy, you can manage your symptoms of seasonal flu at home (see below). You will usually get better without treatment.

Read more on www.nhs.uk