influenzavaccination

What is Influenza vaccination?


Today, children in the United States routinely get vaccines that protect them from more than a dozen diseases such as measles, polio and tetanus. Most of these diseases are now at their lowest levels in history, thanks to years of immunization. Children must get at least some vaccines before they may attend school. Vaccines help make you immune to serious diseases without getting sick first. Without a vaccine, you must actually get a disease in order to become immune to the germ that causes it. Vaccines work best when they are given at certain ages. For example, children don't receive measles vaccine until they are at least one year old. If it is given earlier it might not work as well. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention publishes a schedule for childhood vaccines.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Also known as flu shot, flu shots, flu jab, flu immunization, influenza immunization
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Influenza vaccination information from trusted sources:

Flu jab

Seasonal flu is a highly infectious respiratory illness caused by a flu virus. It spreads rapidly through the coughs and sneezes of infected people.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Influenza

Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system, including your nose, throat, bronchial tubes and lungs.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Influenza

The flu is an infection caused by a virus in the upper breathing passages that may also spread to the lungs. Symptoms include fever, headache, general aches and pains, and extreme exhaustion. The flu is a contagious disease in which the influenza virus is spread through the air by the coughing and sneezing of people who are already infected. The virus is inhaled into the lungs where it attacks tissues involved in breathing. People with the flu usually feel sick rather suddenly, with symptoms that may include fever, headache, and feeling very tired. These symptoms are sometimes followed by coughing and a stuffy or runny nose.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Influenza

The flu is a highly contagious respiratory viral infection. Spread easily by coughing, sneezing, and poor hygiene. Vaccines have been only partially effective because of new and different viral strains that are constantly changing.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com

Rapid flu test

To determine whether or not you have the influenza A or B, to help your doctor make rapid treatment decisions, and to help determine whether or not the flu has come to your community

Read more on www.labtestsonline.org

Flu, Swine

Influenza viruses are small RNA viruses that infect many mammals, including humans, birds, and swine. Before 2009, swine influenza predominately affected swine and was not transmitted often or easily to people. Even in the isolated instances in which swine influenza infected people, it had very limited ability to spread from person to person. Most cases were directly linked to contact with swine through farming or at fairs.

CDC - Seasonal Influenza (Flu) - Key Facts About Seasonal Flu Vaccine

Oct 25, 2010 ... The "flu shot" — an inactivated vaccine (containing killed virus) that is given with a needle, usually in the arm. The flu shot is approved ...

Read more on www.cdc.gov

Influenza Vaccine (Flu Shot) Facts, Vaccination Side Effects and ...

Mar 9, 2011 ... What is the novel H1N1 ("swine" flu) vaccine, and who should receive it? ... Did you have any side effects of your flu vaccination? ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com

Influenza vaccine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Influenza vaccine, also known as a flu shot, is an annual vaccine to protect against the highly variable influenza virus. ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Influenza Vaccine Questions and Answers

There are two types of influenza vaccine. The most common influenza vaccine is made from inactivated (killed) viruses. In June 2003, a live virus influenza ...

Contents

About the vaccine
The seasonal flu vaccine contains different types of flu virus, which are grown in hens' eggs.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Cautions
You should not have the seasonal flu vaccine if...

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Getting the jab
If you think you need a seasonal flu vaccination (see Who should have it), check with your doctor, nurse or local pharmacist.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Who should have it
For most people, seasonal flu is unpleasant but not serious and they recover within a week.

Read more on www.nhs.uk