insomnia

What is Insomnia?


Melatonin is an over-the-counter supplement that's marketed as a way to help overcome insomnia. Your body naturally produces melatonin, releasing it into your bloodstream in increasing amounts starting at dusk and tapering off toward the morning. For most people, taking a melatonin supplement isn't effective in treating insomnia. The safety of using melatonin for more than three months isn't known.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Also known as sleep disorders, narcolepsy, Sleeplessness, wakefulness, Chronic Insomnia, inability to sleep, Primary Insomnia
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Insomnia information from trusted sources:

Insomnia

Most adults have experienced insomnia or sleeplessness at one time or another in their lives. An estimated 30%-50% of the general population are affected by insomnia, and 10% have chronic insomnia.

Narcolepsy

Is it hard for you to fall asleep or stay asleep though the night Do you wake up feeling tired or feel very sleepy during the day, even if you have had enough sleep You might have a sleep disorder. The most common kinds are Nightmares, night terrors, sleepwalking, sleep talking, head banging, wetting the bed and grinding your teeth are kinds of sleep problems called parasomnias. There are treatments for most sleep disorders. Sometimes just having regular sleep habits can help.

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Insomnia

Insomnia includes having trouble falling or staying asleep. It's one of the most common medical complaints. With insomnia, you usually awaken feeling unrefreshed, which takes a toll on your ability to function during the day. Insomnia can sap not only your energy level and mood, but also your health, work performance and quality of life.

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Insomnia

Insomnia is difficulty getting to sleep or staying asleep for long enough to feel refreshed the next morning.

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Narcolepsy

Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder that causes overwhelming and severe daytime sleepiness. Pathologic sleepiness is characterized by the fact that it occurs at inappropriate times and places. The daytime sleep attacks may occur with or without warning, and can occur repeatedly in a single day. Persons with narcolepsy often have fragmented nighttime sleep with frequent brief awakenings.

Sleeping difficulty

Sleeping difficulty, called insomnia, can involve difficulty falling asleep when you first go to bed at night, waking up too early in the morning, and waking up often during the night.

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Sleep Disorders

Sleep disorders involve any difficulties related to sleeping, including difficulty falling or staying asleep, falling asleep at inappropriate times, excessive total sleep time, or abnormal behaviors associated with sleep.

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Narcolepsy

Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder that causes excessive sleepiness and frequent daytime sleep attacks.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Narcolepsy

Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by overwhelming daytime drowsiness and sudden attacks of sleep.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Narcolepsy

Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder that disrupts your normal sleeping pattern. It can cause you to fall asleep suddenly, without warning (known as "sleep attacks") and also tends to make you feel excessively drowsy during the day time.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Contents

Causes
There are many possible causes of insomnia, outlined below.

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Complications
Sleep is as important to your health as a healthy diet and regular exercise. Whatever your reason for sleep loss, insomnia can affect you both mentally and physically. People with insomnia report a lower quality of life compared with people who are sleeping well.

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Diagnosis
If you have difficulty getting to sleep or staying asleep, then consider seeing your GP to discuss your problem.

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Exams and Tests
Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask you questions about your current medications, drug use, and medical history. Usually, these are the only methods needed to diagnose insomnia.

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Lifestyle and home remedies
No matter what your age, insomnia usually is treatable. The key often lies in changes to your routine during the day and when you go to bed. Try these tips: Stick to a sleep schedule. Keep your bedtime and wake time consistent from day to day, including on weekends. Get out of bed when you're not sleeping. Sleep as much as needed to feel rested, and then get out of bed. If you can't sleep, get out of bed after 15 minutes and do something relaxing, such as reading. Avoid trying to sleep. The harder you try, the more awake you'll become. Read or watch television until you become very drowsy, then go to bed to sleep. Use your bed and bedroom only for sleeping or intimate relations. Don't read,...

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Medical advice
Call your doctor if chronic insomnia has become a problem.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
You should be able to sleep if you practice good sleep hygiene. See a doctor if you have chronic insomnia that does not improve.

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Possible Complications
Daytime sleepiness is the most common complication, though there is some evidence that lack of sleep can also lower your immune system's ability to fight infections. Sleep deprivation is also a common cause of auto accidents -- if you are driving and feel sleepy, take a break.

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Preparing for your appointment
If you're having sleep problems, start by talking to your family doctor or a general practitioner. Because appointments can be brief, and there's often a lot of ground to cover, it's a good idea to be well prepared for your appointment. Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment, and what to expect from your doctor.

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Prevention
Some simple measures may help you to get a good night's sleep. Try the below methods for at least three to four weeks. When you find you are asleep for most of the time you are in bed, try going to bed 15 minutes earlier, but make sure you get up at the same time.

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Risk factors
Nearly everyone has an occasional sleepless night. But your risk of insomnia is greater if: You're a woman. Women are twice as likely to experience insomnia. Hormonal shifts during the menstrual cycle and in menopause play a role. Many women report problems sleeping during perimenopause, the time leading up to menopause. During menopause, night sweats and hot flashes often disturb sleep. In postmenopausal women, lack of estrogen is thought to contribute to sleep difficulties. You're over age 60. Because of changes in sleep patterns, insomnia increases with age. According to some estimates, insomnia affects nearly half of all older people. You have a mental health disorder. Many disorders,...

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Symptoms
People who have primary insomnia tend to keep thinking about getting enough sleep. The more they try to sleep, the greater their sense of frustration and distress, and the more difficult sleep becomes.

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Treatment
The first step in treating insomnia is to diagnose and treat any underlying medical condition that is causing your insomnia. Once your condition is treated, your insomnia will often disappear without further medical help.

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