intensivecare

What is intensive care?


Intensive care units (ICUs) contain a variety of specialised equipment, which may vary from one unit to another. The kind of equipment an ICU has depends on what kind of patients it specialises in treating; for example, a neonatal ICU will have incubators for critically ill babies.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Also known as critical care, icu, life support, Surgical Intensive Care
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intensive care information from trusted sources:

Critical Care

People with life-threatening injuries and illnesses need critical care. Critical care involves close, constant attention by a team of specially-trained health professionals. It usually takes place in an intensive care unit (ICU) or trauma center. Problems that might need critical care treatment include complications from surgery, accidents, infections and severe breathing problems. Monitors, intravenous (IV) tubes, feeding tubes, catheters, ventilators and other equipment are common in critical care units. These can sustain life but can also increase the risk of infection.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Intensive care

An intensive care unit (ICU), also sometimes known as a critical care unit or an intensive therapy department, is a special ward found inside most hospitals. It provides intensive care (treatment and monitoring) for people who are in a critically ill or unstable condition.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

K+care ET

Potassium is needed to maintain good health. Although a balanced diet usually supplies all the potassium a person needs, potassium supplements may be needed by patients who do not have enough potassium in their regular diet or have lost too much potassium because of illness or treatment with certain medicines.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Eye Care Providers

When you need to visit an eye care professional, it is important to make sure that you see the person who is most qualified to take care of any concerns or problems that you may have regarding your eyes. The 3 main types of eye care professionals are ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians.

CARE ONE IBUPROFEN PM

for relief of occasional sleeplessness when associated with minor aches and pains helps you fall asleep and stay asleep...

Read more on dailymed.nlm.nih.gov

Imiquimod

Intense local inflammatory reactions including skin weeping or erosion can occur after few applications of Aldara Cream and may require an interruption of dosing. [see Dosage and Administration (2) and Adverse Reactions (6)]. Aldara Cream has the potential to exacerbate inflammatory conditions of the skin, including chronic graft versus host disease.

Read more on www.druglib.com

Diabetic Foot Care

Diabetes (di-uh-be-tees) is a disease that changes the way your body uses the sugar found in food. Without the right treatment, the sugar level in your blood may go very high or very low. This can cause many problems with your health. Diabetes causes problems with blood circulation and makes you more likely to get infections (in-fek-shuns). Diabetes can also cause nerve problems so you may not have good feeling in your legs and feet.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Intensive-care medicine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Intensive-care medicine or critical-care medicine is a branch of medicine concerned with the provision of life support or organ support systems in patients ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

SCCM - Society of Critical Care Medicine

Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) is the largest multiprofessional organization dedicated to ensuring excellence and consistency in the practice of ...

Read more on www.sccm.org

PedsCCM.org: The Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Website

PedsCCM: The Web Site for Pediatric Critical Care Medicine.

Read more on pedsccm.org

Contents

Indications
Intensive care is needed when...

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Recovery
Once you can breathe unaided, and you no longer need intensive care, you will be transferred to less critical ward to continue your recovery. Depending on your condition, this will usually either be a high dependency unit (HDU), which is one step down from intensive care, or a general ward.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
What happens
An intensive care unit (ICU) can be an extremely overwhelming place for both patients and their loved ones. It can therefore help to know a little about what to expect.

Read more on www.nhs.uk