irritablebowelsyndrome

What is Irritable Bowel Syndrome?


The following nontraditional therapies may help relieve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome: Acupuncture. Although study results on the effects of acupuncture on symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome have been mixed, some people use acupuncture to help relax muscle spasms and improve bowel function.; Herbs. Peppermint is a natural antispasmodic that relaxes smooth muscles in the intestines. Peppermint may provide short-term relief of IBS symptoms, but study results have been inconsistent. If you'd like to try peppermint, be sure to use enteric-coated capsules. Peppermint may aggravate heartburn. Before taking any herbs, check with your doctor to be sure they won't interact or interfere with...

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Also known as ibs, spastic colon, Irritable Colon, Mucous Colitis, nervous indigestion, Irritable Bowel Syndromes, intestinal neurosis, functional colitis, laxative colitis, Mucous Colitides
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Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic gastrointestinal disorder of unknown cause. Common symptoms include abdominal cramping or pain, bloating and gassiness, and altered bowel habits. Irritable bowel syndrome has been called spastic colon, functional bowel disease, and mucous colitis. However, IBS is not a true "colitis." The term colitis refers to a separate condition known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Irritable bowel syndrome is not contagious, inherited, or cancerous. However, IBS often disrupts daily living activities. Nineteen percent of respondents in a survey of married or cohabiting people with IBS stated that they had difficulties in their personal relationships, and 45% stated that IBS interfered with their sex life.

IBS

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a problem that affects the large intestine. It can cause abdominal cramping, bloating and a change in bowel habits. Some people with the disorder have constipation. Some have diarrhea. Some go back and forth between constipation and diarrhea. Although IBS can cause a great deal of discomfort, it does not harm the intestines. IBS is a common disorder and happens more often in women than men. No one knows the exact cause of IBS. There is no specific test for IBS. However, your doctor may run tests to be sure you don't have other diseases. These tests may include stool sampling tests, blood tests and x-rays. Your doctor may also do a test called a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy. Most people diagnosed with IBS can control their symptoms with diet, stress management and medicine.

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder that affects the large intestine (colon). Irritable bowel syndrome commonly causes cramping, abdominal pain, bloating gas, diarrhea and constipation. Despite these uncomfortable signs and symptoms, IBS doesn't cause permanent damage to your colon.

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic (long-term) disorder that affects the digestive system. It causes abdominal pain, diarrhoea and constipation.

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a disorder of the lower digestive tract that results in abnormal bowel habits and abdominal pain/discomfort. People with IBS suffer from recurrent episodes of abdominal pain coupled with diarrhea and/or constipation. Spastic colitis, irritable colon, and nervous stomach are names for the problem. The majority of patients simply endure their symptoms, never bothering to seek help from a doctor. Others are so plagued by the disorder that they are reluctant to leave home during an attack because they are in too much pain, or else they fear they will not being able to find a bathroom quickly enough.

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Describes causes, symptoms, tests to rule out more serious intestinal diseases, and lifestyle and medical approaches to symptom management.

Irritable bowel syndrome - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS or spastic colon) is a diagnosis of exclusion. It is a functional bowel disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain, ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Irritable Bowel Syndrome / IBS Health Center - WebMD

From symptoms to treatment options, find information to help cope with irritable bowel syndrome.

Read more on www.webmd.com

Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Tips on Controlling Your Symptoms ...

Learn about the symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a common intestinal problem.

Read more on familydoctor.org

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Causes, Symptoms, Diet, and ...

Mar 10, 2011 ... In many cases, dietary fiber may lessen IBS symptoms, particularly constipation. However, it may not help with lowering pain or decreasing ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com

Contents

Causes
It's not known exactly what causes irritable bowel syndrome. The walls of the intestines are lined with layers of muscle that contract and relax in a coordinated rhythm as they move food from your stomach through your intestinal tract to your rectum. If you have irritable bowel syndrome, the contractions may be stronger and last longer than normal. Food is forced through your intestines more quickly, causing gas, bloating and diarrhea.

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Complications
Diarrhea and constipation, both signs of irritable bowel syndrome, can aggravate hemorrhoids. In addition, if you avoid certain foods, you may not get enough of the nutrients you need, leading to malnourishment.

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Coping and support
Living with irritable bowel syndrome presents daily challenges. It may be painful or embarrassing and can seriously affect the quality of your life. These suggestions may help you cope more easily: Learn as much about IBS as you can. Talk to your doctor, look for information on the Internet from reputable sources such as the National Institutes of Health, and read books and pamphlets. Being informed about your condition can help you take better charge of it.; Identify the factors that trigger IBS. This is a key step both in managing your condition and in helping you feel you have control of your life.; Seek out others with IBS. Talking to people who know what you're going through can be...

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Diagnosis
If you have the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), your GP will usually recommend that you undergo a blood test in order that other conditions that cause similar symptoms, such as infection, or Coeliac disease (a stomach condition caused by gluten intolerance) can be ruled out.

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Exams and Tests
Most of the time, your doctor can diagnose IBS with few or no tests. Tests usually reveal no problems. Some experts recommend a lactose-free diet for 2 weeks to evaluate for possible lactase deficiency.

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Lifestyle and home remedies
In many cases, simple changes in your diet and lifestyle can provide relief from irritable bowel syndrome. Although your body may not respond immediately to these changes, your goal is to find long-term, not temporary, solutions: Experiment with fiber. When you have irritable bowel syndrome, fiber can be a mixed blessing. Although it helps reduce constipation, it can also make gas and cramping worse. The best approach is to gradually increase the amount of fiber in your diet over a period of weeks. Examples of foods that contain fiber are whole grains, fruits, vegetables and beans. If your signs and symptoms remain the same or worse, tell your doctor. You may also want to talk to a dietitian....

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Medical advice
Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome or if you notice a persistent change in your bowel habits.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
Irritable bowel syndrome may be a lifelong condition, but symptoms can often be improved or relieved through treatment.

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Preparing for your appointment
Make an appointment with your doctor if you have symptoms of IBS. After an initial evaluation, your doctor may refer you to a specialist in digestive disorders (gastroenterologist) for more extensive testing.

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Prevention
Anyone can experience digestive upset from worry or anxiety. But if you have irritable bowel syndrome, stress-related problems such as abdominal pain and diarrhea tend to occur with greater frequency and intensity. Finding ways to deal with stress may be helpful in preventing or alleviating symptoms: Counseling. In some cases, a psychologist or psychiatrist can help you learn to reduce stress by looking at how you respond to events and then working with you to modify or change that response.; Biofeedback. This stress-reduction technique helps you reduce muscle tension and slow your heart rate with the feedback help of a machine. You're then taught how to produce these changes yourself. The...

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Risk factors
Many people have occasional signs and symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, but you're more likely to have IBS if you: Are young. IBS begins before the age of 35 for 50 percent of people.; Are female. Overall, about twice as many women as men have the condition.; Have a family history of IBS. Studies have shown that people who have a first-degree relative such as a parent or sibling with IBS are at increased risk of the condition.

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Symptoms
The signs and symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome can vary widely from person to person and often resemble those of other diseases. Among the most common are: Abdominal pain or cramping; A bloated feeling; Gas (flatulence); Diarrhea or constipation sometimes alternating bouts of constipation and diarrhea; Mucus in the stool

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Treatment
Making changes to your diet can help to control the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, there is no 'one size fits all' diet for people with IBS. Different individuals will respond better to individually tailored diets.

Read more on www.nhs.uk