lupusnephritis

What is lupus nephritis?


A physical exam shows signs of decreased kidney functioning with edema. Blood pressure may be high. Abnormal sounds may be heard when the doctor listens to the heart and lungs, indicating fluid overload.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Also known as Lupus Glomerulonephritis, nephritis - lupus, lupus glomerular disease, Lupus Nephritides, Lupus Glomerulonephritides
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Lupus nephritis

Lupus nephritis is a kidney disorder that is a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Lupus

Lupus is a chronic inflammatory disease that occurs when your body's immune system attacks your own tissues and organs. Inflammation caused by lupus can affect many different body systems, including your joints, skin, kidneys, blood cells, heart and lungs.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Lupus

Lupus is a chronic condition that causes inflammation in the body's tissues. It is an autoimmune condition, which means that it is caused by a fault in the immune system. In people with Lupus, the immune system attacks the body's healthy cells and tissue instead of protecting the body from illness and infection.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Lupus

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), or lupus, is an autoimmune disease in which a person's immune system attacks various organs or cells of the body, causing damage and dysfunction. Lupus is called a multisystem disease because it can affect many different tissues and organs in the body. Some patients with lupus have very mild disease, which can be treated with simple medications, whereas others can have serious, life-threatening complications. Lupus is more common in women than men, and for reasons that are not precisely understood, its peak incidence is after puberty.

LA

To help evaluate a prolonged partial thromboplastin time (PTT) and/or a thrombotic episode, to help determine the cause of recurrent fetal loss, and as part of an evaluation for antiphospholipid syndrome, not a diagnostic test for lupus

Read more on www.labtestsonline.org

Lupus erythematosus

Lupus is an autoimmune disorder that can affect many different parts of the body. Normally the immune system protects the body by fighting off bacteria, viruses, and other foreign invaders. However, if you have an autoimmune disease like lupus, the immune system starts attacking your own healthy tissue. This in turn, causes inflammation, which damages the tissues. Doctors do not completely understand why autoimmunity occurs, but they suspect that it involves some combination of genetics and triggering by environmental factors, such as viruses.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), also called lupus, is a chronic inflammatory disease that can affect almost any part of the body, especially the skin, joints, kidneys, heart, lungs, bones, blood, or brain. Systemic lupus erythematosus is considered an autoimmune disorder, meaning that a person's own immune system attacks his or her own healthy cells and tissues, causing inflammation and damage.

Read more on www.visualdxhealth.com

Lupus Nephritis

Lupus nephritis is an inflammation of the kidney caused by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a disease of the immune system. SLE typically causes harm to ...

Read more on kidney.niddk.nih.gov

LUPUS FOUNDATION OF AMERICA - Kidney Disease

Lupus nephritis is an important and potentially serious symptom of lupus. ... 1) Often the signs of lupus nephritis are seen only in urine studies. ...

Read more on www.lupus.org

Lupus nephritis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lupus nephritis is an inflammation of the kidney caused by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a disease of the immune system. Apart from the kidneys, ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Contents

Causes
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, or lupus) is an autoimmune disease. This means there is a problem with the body's immune system.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Medical advice
Call your health care provider if you have blood in the urine or swelling of your body.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Outlook (Prognosis)
The outcome varies depending on the specific form of lupus nephritis. Patients may have acute flare-ups with alternating symptom-free periods.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Possible Complications
Acute renal failure Chronic renal failure End-stage renal disease Nephrotic syndrome

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Prevention
There is no known prevention for lupus nephritis.

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Symptoms
Symptoms of lupus nephritis include: Blood in the urine ; Foamy appearance to urine; High blood pressure ; Swelling of any area of the body

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Treatment
The goal of treatment is to improve kidney function. Medicines may include corticosteroids or other medications that suppress the immune system, such as cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate mofetil, or azathioprine. You may need dialysis to control symptoms of kidney failure. A kidney transplant may be recommended. (People with active lupus should not have a transplant.)

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov