malaria

What is malaria?


Malaria is caused by a parasite that is transmitted from one human to another by the bite of infected Anopheles mosquitoes. In humans, the parasites (called sporozoites) travel to the liver, where they mature and release another form, the merozoites. These enter the bloodstream and infect the red blood cells.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Also known as plasmodium, blackwater fever, Remittent Fever, Paludism, Plasmodium Infection, Marsh Fever, Plasmodium Infections, biduoterian fever
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malaria information from trusted sources:

Malaria

Malaria is a parasitic disease that involves high fevers, shaking chills, flu-like symptoms, and anemia.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Malaria

Malaria is an infection of the blood that is carried from person to person by mosquitoes. The disease has been recognized for thousands of years and once was found almost everywhere except in the most northern areas of the world. Malaria has been wiped out in North America, Western Europe, and Russia. It remains a serious problem in much of the tropical and subtropical world, however. Millions of people continue to be infected every year, and probably up to 1 million of them die. Although the United States is malaria-free, hundreds of cases a year are still reported here. Most of these are people who acquired the disease overseas.

Malaria

Malaria is an infectious disease caused by a parasite that's transmitted by mosquitoes. The illness results in recurrent attacks of chills and fever, and it can be deadly.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Malaria

Malaria is a tropical disease passed on to humans by mosquitoes, and is present in over 100 countries. Malaria is spread by the female of the Anopheles species of mosquito. When one of these mosquitoes bites you, it feeds on your blood and injects malaria parasites into your body. It only takes one bite to infect you. In some forms of malaria, parasites can stay dormant in your body for years, occasionally "waking up" and causing you to have more attacks of malaria. However, you can't catch malaria from another person, just from a mosquito.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Malaria

Malaria (mah-LAR-ee-ah) is an infectious disease that is caused by parasites (bugs) and is usually spread through the bite of infected mosquitoes. This infection, which affects people worldwide, is the most important and one of the most common infections caused by parasites. It usually affects people living in warm and humid parts of the world. It may also occur in travelers and migrants who are returning from areas where malaria is common. Malaria may affect many organs in the body, including the brain, lungs, kidneys, and liver. A more severe form of malaria that affects the brain is called cerebral malaria.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Malaria

An acute and sometimes chronic infectious disease due to the presence of protozoan parasites within red blood cells. These parasites are discharged through salivary ducts when the mosquito "bites" a person.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com

Malaria - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease of humans caused by eukaryotic protists of the genus Plasmodium. It is widespread in tropical and subtropical ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

CDC - Malaria

Dec 3, 2010 ... Malaria diagnosis and treatment and prevention, including transmission, antimalarial prophylaxis, malaria map, malaria hotline re: travelers ...

Read more on www.cdc.gov

WHO | Malaria

Malaria is caused by a parasite called Plasmodium, which is transmitted via the bites of infected mosquitoes. In the human body, the parasites multiply in ...

Read more on www.who.int

Malaria Symptoms, Treatment, Cycle, Prevention in Children and ...

Mar 11, 2011 ... Malaria is an infectious disease caused by a parasite, Plasmodium, which infects red blood cells. Malaria is characterized by cycles of ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com

Contents

Complications
Most serious complications of malaria are associated with infection by P. falciparum. Among the complications are: Anemia. This can result from extensive destruction of red blood cells.; Cerebral malaria. If parasite-filled blood cells block small blood vessels to your brain (cerebral malaria), swelling of your brain or brain damage may occur.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Diagnosis
If you're abroad and you start showing symptoms which could be malaria, get to your nearest doctor or hospital as quickly as you can. You will probably need to give a blood sample to check for parasites.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Exams and Tests
During a physical examination, the doctor may identify an enlarged liver or an enlarged spleen. Malaria blood smears taken at 6 to 12 hour intervals confirm the diagnosis.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Medical advice
Call your health care provider if you develop fever and headache after visiting the tropics.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Outlook (Prognosis)
The outcome is expected to be good in most cases of malaria with treatment, but poor in Falciparum infection with complications.

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Possible Complications
Destruction of blood cells (hemolytic anemia) Liver failure and kidney failure Meningitis Respiratory failure from fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) Rupture of the spleen leading to massive internal bleeding (hemorrhage)

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Preparing for your appointment
If you suspect you have malaria or that you've been exposed, you're likely to start by first seeing your family doctor. However, in some cases when you call to set up an appointment, you may be referred immediately to an infectious disease specialist.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Prevention
Most people living in areas where malaria is common have acquired some immunity to the disease. Visitors will not have immunity, and should take preventive medications. It is important to see your health care provider well before your trip, because treatment may begin is long as 2 weeks before travel to the area, and continue for a month after you leave the area. The types of anti-malarial medications prescribed will depend on the area you visit. According to the CDC, travelers to South America,...

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Risk factors
People who have little or no immunity to malaria are most at risk for serious illness. Residents of a malaria region may acquire some immunity to the disease during their lifetime, but those who haven't yet acquired immunity are at risk. People at increased risk for serious disease include: Young children and infants; Travelers coming from areas with no malaria; Pregnant women and their unborn children

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Symptoms
Symptoms of malaria tend to appear between 10 days to 4 weeks after the initial bite. However, in some cases, depending on the type of parasite you are infected with, it can take a year before your symptoms start to show.

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Treatments and drugs
Medications A malaria infection, particularly with P. falciparum, requires prompt evaluation and treatment. In most cases, doctors can treat malaria effectively with one or more of the following medications: Chloroquine (Aralen); Quinine sulfate (Qualaquin); Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil); Combination of sulfadoxine and pyrimethamine (Fansidar); Mefloquine (Lariam); Combination of atovaquone and proguanil (Malarone); Doxycycline (Doryx, Vibramycin, others)

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com