memoryimpairment

What is memory impairment?


Your mind works a lot like a computer. Your brain puts information it judges to be important into "files." When you remember something, you pull up a file. Memory doesn't always work perfectly. As people grow older, it may take longer to retrieve those files. Some adults joke about having a "senior moment." It's normal to forget things once in awhile. We've all forgotten a name, where we put our keys, or if we locked the front door. But forgetting how to use the telephone or find your way home may be signs of a more serious problem. These include Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia, stroke, depression, head injuries, thyroid problems, or reactions to certain medicines. If you're worried about your forgetfulness, see your doctor.

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Mild cognitive impairment - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI, also known as incipient dementia, or isolated memory impairment) is a diagnosis given to individuals who have cognitive ...

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FCA: Caring for Adults with Cognitive and Memory Impairments

We know that cognitive and memory impairments can change how a person thinks, acts and/or feels. These changes often present special challenges for families ...

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Age Associated Memory Impairment

Age Associated Memory Impairment is a common condition characterized by very mild symptoms of cognitive decline that occur as part of the normal aging ...

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Memory Impairment Study (Mild Cognitive Impairment Study) - Full ...

Oct 29, 1999 ... The Memory Impairment Study is the first such AD prevention clinical trial carried out by NIH, and will be conducted at 65-80 medical ...

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Questions and Answers on Launch of NIA Memory Impairment Study ...

Mar 15, 1999 ... Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a condition characterized by memory impairment with otherwise unaffected cognitive functioning. ...

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Memory loss Information on Healthline

Organic Memory Impairment Images. Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system · Central nervous system and periphe... Memory loss may result from ...

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Can Meditation Reverse Memory Loss?

Mar 3, 2010 ... Meditation can increase blood flow in the brain and improve memory, according to researchers who tested a specific kind of meditation and ...

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Subjective Memory Impairment an Independent Risk Factor for Dementia

by P Anderson - 2010

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Possible Early Dementia

Dementia is a serious brain disorder that interferes with a persons ability to carry out everyday tasks. The key feature of dementia is a decline in cognitive functions. These are mental processes such as thinking, reasoning, learning, problem solving, memory, language, and speech. Other features that occur frequently in dementia include changes in personality and behavior. Generally, these symptoms are not considered dementia unless they have continued unabated for at least 6 months. Dementia has many different causes. Some may be reversible, such as certain infections, drug intoxication, and liver diseases. Of the irreversible causes, the most common in older adults is Alzheimer disease. Although dementia is frequently linked to old age (getting senile), it is not a normal part of aging. Even children with certain degenerative brain disorders can develop dementia. Alzheimer disease usually begins with mild, slowly worsening memory loss. Many older people fear that they have Alzheimer disease because they cant find their eyeglasses or remember someones name.

Visualization

Visualization involves the controlled use of mental images for therapeutic purposes. It has been proposed that the use of imagery in visualization may correct unhealthy attitudes or views. People who practice this mind-body technique call on memory and imagination. In some regards, visualization is similar to hypnosis or hypnotherapy. The technique is usually practiced alone. Visualization audiotapes are available.

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Contents

Mild cognitive impairment
Mild cognitive impairment is a transition stage between the cognitive decline of normal aging and the more serious problems caused by Alzheimer's disease.

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Memory loss
Memory loss (amnesia) is unusual forgetfulness.

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MEMORY FORMULA
Multivitamins are given to people who need more vitamins in their diet.

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Amnesia
Amnesia refers to the loss of memories, such as facts, information and experiences. Though having no sense of who you are is a common plot device in movies and television, real-life amnesia generally doesn't cause a loss of self-identity.

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Remembering tips
Here are tips to help you remember: Associate, or link, the word or thing you are trying to remember to something else. For example, if Alex introduces you to Patty, you might remember them as A and P. If you can't remember something at first, relax and try again. Make lists, either on paper or in your head. Read a lot if you have trouble remembering words. Keep a dictionary close by. Reduce the amount of alcohol you drink. Alcohol can make it hard to remember things. Repeat what you want to remember. Take part in activities that stimulate the mind, such as crossword puzzles and board games. This helps keep the nerve cells in the brain active, which is very important as you get older. Talk to your doctor about your medications. Certain drugs can affect your memory. Think of faces when trying to remember names. See also: Alzheimer's disease Memory loss Multiple sclerosis

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Mental status tests
Memory, Word comprehension, Orientation, Attention span, Cognitive tests

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Dementia
Memory loss and other dementia symptoms have many causes, so diagnosis can be challenging and may require several doctor visits. Diagnosis involves a number of tests.

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Speech impairment
Speech and language impairment may be any of several problems that make it difficult to communicate. See also: Stuttering Expressive language disorder - developmental

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Hearing or speech impairment - resources
The following organizations are good resources for information on hearing impairment or speech impairment: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association - www.asha.org National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders - www.nidcd.nih.gov Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing - www.agbell.org American Academy of Audiology - www.audiology.org See also: Blindness - resources

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Vision Impairment and Blindness
Vision impairment, or low vision, means that even with eyeglasses, contact lenses, medicine or surgery, you don't see well. Vision impairment can range from mild to severe. The leading causes of vision impairment and blindness in the United States are age-related eye diseases: macular degeneration, cataract and glaucoma. Other eye disorders, eye injuries and birth defects can also cause vision loss. A loss of vision means that you may have to reorganize your life and learn new ways of doing things. If you have some vision, visual aids such as special glasses and large print books can make life easier. There are also devices to help those with no vision, like text-reading software and braille books.

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Hearing impairment
Age is the biggest single cause of hearing impairment. Hearing impairment that develops as a result of age is often known as age-related hearing loss, or presbycusis.

Read more on www.nhs.uk