menieresdisease

What is meniere's disease?


The inner ear has fluid-filled tubes called semicircular canals, or labyrinths. The canals, along with a nerve in your skull, help interpret your body's position and maintain your balance.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Also known as Menieres Disease, Meniere's Syndrome, Meniere Disease, hydrops, endolymphatic hydrops, Meniere Syndrome, Menieres Syndrome, Aural Vertigo
Search for any health
topic on HealthMash:

Explore and Discover

meniere's disease information from trusted sources:

Meniere Disease

Méniére disease is a syndrome in which you experience episodes of spinning vertigo (sense of the room spinning), hearing loss, and tinnitus (ringing in the ear). Between the unpredictable attacks, you usually do not have any problems or symptoms of the disease. Méniére disease was first described in 1861 by the French physician Prosper Méniére. Yet the cause of this syndrome still remains largely unknown.

Meniere's disease

Meniere's disease can cause severe dizziness, a roaring sound in your ears called tinnitus, hearing loss that comes and goes and the feeling of ear pressure or pain. It usually affects just one ear. It is a common cause of hearing loss. Scientists don't yet know the cause. They think that it has to do with the fluid levels or the mixing of fluids in the canals of your inner ear. Symptoms occur suddenly and can happen as often as every day or as seldom as once a year. An attack can be a combination of severe dizziness or vertigo, tinnitus and hearing loss lasting several hours.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Meniere's disease

Meniere's disease is a disorder of the inner ear that causes abnormal sensory perceptions, including a sensation of a spinning motion (vertigo), hearing loss usually in one ear, fullness or pressure in the same ear, and ringing in the same ear (tinnitus).

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Meniere's disease

Méniére's disease, named after the French physician, Prosper Méniére, is a rare disorder that affects the inner ear. It is a difficult and unpredictable disease that can require different types of treatment.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Meniere's disease

Meniere's (me-NYARZ) disease is a condition that affects the inner ear. The inner ear contains the nerve of the ear and small organs that help you hear and maintain your balance. The inner ear is filled with fluid that acts as a sensor when you change the position of your head. When you move your head, the fluid also moves and stimulates the nerves in the inner ear. The nerves then send messages to the brain about your body position and motion.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Gum disease

Any abnormality, inflammatory or degenerative, of the tissue around a tooth. (Periodontal means "located around a tooth") The term refers to any disorder of the gums or other supporting structures of the teeth. Periodontitis is the inflammation or degeneration, or both, of the dental periosteum, alveolar bone, cementum, and adjacent gingiva. Suppuration ususally occurs, supporting bone is resorbed, teeth become loose, and recession of gingivae occurs. Usually follows chronic gingivitis, Vincent's infection, or poor dental hygiene.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com

Ménière's Disease [NIDCD Health Information]

Sep 13, 2010 ... Ménière's disease is a disorder of the inner ear that causes severe dizziness (vertigo), ringing in the ears (tinnitus), hearing loss, ...

Read more on www.nidcd.nih.gov

Ménière's disease - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ménière's disease is a disorder of the inner ear that can affect hearing and balance to a varying degree. It is characterized by episodes of vertigo and ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Meniere Disease (Idiopathic Endolymphatic Hydrops) Causes ...

Mar 11, 2011 ... Read about Meniere's disease (an inner ear disorder with symptoms that include vertigo, tinnitus, hearing loss, and the sensation of ear ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com

Meniere's Disease -- familydoctor.org

Learn about the symptoms of and treatment for Meniere's disease, an inner ear problem.

Read more on familydoctor.org

Contents

Complications
The unpredictable episodes of vertigo are usually the most debilitating problem of Meniere's disease. The episodes often force a person to lie down for several hours and lose time from work or leisure activities, and they can cause embarrassment.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Coping and support
Meniere's disease may affect your interaction with friends and family, your productivity at work, and the overall quality of your life. You may find encouragement and understanding in a support group. Group members can provide information, resources, support and coping strategies. Your doctor may be able to recommend a group in your area, or you may find information about local groups from the Vestibular Disorders Association.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Diagnosis
There is no single test for Méniére's disease. Your GP will look at your medical history, consider your symptoms and conduct a physical examination. For the condition to be diagnosed, you will need to have all three of the primary symptoms of vertigo (at least two episodes lasting 20 minutes or more within a single attack), tinnitus and hearing loss. However, you should be referred to an ear nose and throat (ENT) specialist to assess the extent of your hearing loss before a definite diagnosis of Méniére's disease can be established.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Exams and Tests
A neurological examination may show problems with hearing, balance, or eye movement.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Lifestyle and home remedies
Certain self-care tactics can help reduce the impact of Meniere's disease. Consider these tips: Sit or lie down immediately when you feel dizzy. During an episode of vertigo, avoid things that can make your signs and symptoms worse, such as sudden movement, bright lights, watching television or reading. Rest during and after attacks. Don't rush to return to your normal activities. Be aware of the possibility of losing your balance. Falling could lead to serious injury. Use good lighting if you get up in the night. Consider walking with a cane for stability if you experience chronic balance problems. Avoid driving a car or operating heavy machinery if you experience frequent episodes of vertigo....

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Medical advice
Call for an appointment with your health care provider if symptoms of Meniere's disease, such as hearing loss, ringing in the ears, or dizziness, occur or worsen.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Outlook (Prognosis)
The outcome varies. Meniere's disease can often be controlled with treatment. Recovery may occur spontaneously. However, the disorder may be chronic or disabling.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Possible Complications
Inability to walk or function due to uncontrollable vertigo Hearing loss on the affected side

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Prevention
There is no known prevention for Meniere's disease, but prompt treatment of ear infection and other related disorders may be helpful.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Risks
If you drive and you are diagnosed with Méniére's disease, or you are experiencing the primary symptoms of vertigo and hearing loss, then you must inform the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) of your condition. The DVLA states that if you drive a car, or motorcycle, and you have recently been diagnosed with Méniére's disease, you must cease driving. Driving will not be permitted again until you have satisfactory control of your symptoms. Your GP or ear, nose and throat specialist will have to confirm that your symptoms have improved and are under control.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Symptoms
Symptoms include:Abnormal sensations of movement (vertigo) Gets worse with sudden movement; Lasts for a few minuts to several hours; May come and go ; Dizziness; Hearing loss in one or both ears Low frequency noises lost first; Extent of hearing loss may change; Noises or ringing in the ear (tinnitus); Sudden episodes of complete disorientation that causes the person to fall down; Sweating (may be heavy); Uncontrollable eye movements ; Vomiting and nausea

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Treatments and drugs
There is no cure for Meniere's disease, but a number of strategies may help you manage some symptoms.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com