menopause

What is Menopause?


Many approaches have been promoted as aids in managing the symptoms of menopause, but not all of them have scientific evidence to back up the claims. Below are some complementary and alternative treatments that have been or are being studied: Phytoestrogens. These estrogens occur naturally in certain foods. There are two main types of phytoestrogens isoflavones and lignans. Isoflavones are found in soybeans, chickpeas and other legumes. Lignans occur in flaxseed, whole grains and some fruits and vegetables. Whether the estrogens in these foods can relieve hot flashes and other menopausal signs and symptoms remains to be seen. Most studies have found them ineffective. Isoflavones have some...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Also known as hot flashes, perimenopause, premenopausal, change of life, postmenopause, Female Change of Life
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Menopause, Menopause Information, About Menopause

Welcome to the official site of the North American Menopause Society. Here you can get up-to-date menopause information and the latest scientific news about ...

Read more on www.menopause.org

Menopause

Menopause marks the end of a woman's reproductive years. During her 40's, a woman's ovaries reduce production of the female hormones estrogen and ...

Read more on www.womensheart.org

Menopause Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments and Causes ...

Menopause information including symptoms, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, treatment, causes, patient stories, videos, forums, prevention, and prognosis.

Read more on www.wrongdiagnosis.com

Menopause: eMedicine Obstetrics and Gynecology

Nov 12, 2010 ... Overview: Menopause Menopause is a universal and irreversible part of the overall aging process involving a woman's reproductive system, ...

Read more on emedicine.medscape.com

ACOG Education Pamphlet AP047 -- The Menopause Years

As menopause nears, the ovaries make less estrogen. One of the earliest and most common signs that menopause may be approaching is a change in your ...

Read more on www.acog.org

Menopause

Menopause is the permanent end of menstruation and fertility, defined as occurring 12 months after your last menstrual period.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Menopause: Diagnosis & Tests

Diagnosing menopause isn't always easy. Learn about how menopause is sometimes diagnosed, and about tests you'll want to take as your body changes.

Read more on www.webmd.com

Menopause - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Menopause is a term used to describe the permanent cessation of the primary functions of the human ovaries: the ripening and release of ova and the release ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Menopause - Perimenopause - Surgical Menopause

Menopause occurs when menstruation ceases for a period of one year; ... Learn what menopause is, the symptoms of perimenopause and menopause, ...

Read more on womenshealth.about.com

menopause - Dictionary of Cancer Terms

Natural menopause usually occurs around age 50. A woman is said to be in menopause when she hasn't had a period for 12 months in a row. ...

Read more on www.cancer.gov

Contents

Causes
Menopause is a natural event that normally occurs between the ages of 45 and 55.

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Complications
Several chronic medical conditions can develop after menopause: Cardiovascular disease. When your estrogen levels decline, your risk of cardiovascular disease increases. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in women as well as in men. Yet you can do a great deal to reduce your risk of heart disease. These risk-reduction steps include stopping smoking, reducing high blood pressure, getting regular aerobic exercise, and eating a diet low in saturated fats and plentiful in whole grains, fruits and vegetables.; Osteoporosis. During the first few years after menopause, you may lose bone density at a rapid rate, increasing your risk of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis causes bones to become brittle...

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Diagnosis
If you think you are experiencing menopausal symptoms and you are finding them difficult to deal with, you should see your GP. They should be able to diagnose peri-menopause or menopause by considering your age, whether or not you are still having periods, and asking you about your symptoms.

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Exams and Tests
Blood and urine tests can be used to measure changes in hormone levels that may signal when a woman is close to menopause or has already gone through menopause. Examples of these tests include: Estradiol ; FSH ; LH

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Lifestyle and home remedies
Fortunately, many of the signs and symptoms associated with menopause are temporary. Take these steps to help reduce or prevent their effects: Cool hot flashes. Get regular exercise, dress in layers and try to pinpoint what triggers your hot flashes. For many women, triggers may include hot beverages, spicy foods, alcohol, hot weather and even a warm room.; Decrease vaginal discomfort. Use over-the-counter water-based vaginal lubricants (Astroglide, K-Y) or moisturizers (Replens, Vagisil). Staying sexually active also helps.; Optimize your sleep. Avoid caffeine and plan to exercise during the day, although not right before bedtime. Relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing, guided imagery...

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Medical advice
Call your health care provider if:You are spotting blood between periods; You have had 12 consecutive months with no period and suddenly vaginal bleeding or spotting begins again

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Possible Complications
Postmenopausal bleeding may occur. This bleeding is often nothing to worry about. However, your health care provider should always check any postmenopausal bleeding, because it may be an early sign of other problems, including cancer.

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Preparing for your appointment
Your first appointment will likely be with either your primary care provider or a gynecologist.

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Prevention
Menopause is a natural and expected part of a woman's development and does not need to be prevented. However, there are ways to reduce or eliminate some of the symptoms of menopause.

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Self help
If your menopausal symptoms are not severe, it may not be necessary to treat them using medication. Many women who experience menopausal symptoms find they can ease them by making changes to their lifestyle and diet.

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Symptoms
In some women, menstrual flow comes to a sudden halt. More commonly, it slowly stops over time. During this time, the menstrual periods generally become either more closely or more widely spaced. This irregularity may last for 1 - 3 years before menstruation finally ends completely. Before this the cycle length may shorten to as little as every 3 weeks.

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Treatment
Only one in 10 women seek medical advice when they go through the menopause, and many do not need any treatment at all. However, if you are having menopausal symptoms and they are severe enough to interfere with your daily life, there are treatments available that can help.

Read more on www.nhs.uk