morningsickness

What is morning sickness?


Various alternative remedies have been suggested for morning sickness, including: Acupressure. Acupressure wristbands are available without a prescription in most pharmacies. Although acupressure wristbands haven't been found to be more effective than sham therapies, some women seem to find the wristbands helpful.; Acupuncture. Acupuncture involves inserting hair-thin needles into your skin. Acupuncture isn't a proven way to treat morning sickness, but some women seem to find it helpful.; Ginger. Herbal ginger supplements seem to alleviate morning sickness for some women. Most research suggests that ginger can be used safely during pregnancy, but there's some concern that ginger may affect...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Also known as nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, nausea in the morning - females, vomiting in the morning - females
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morning sickness information from trusted sources:

Morning sickness

Morning sickness is nausea and vomiting that can actually occur at any time of the day during pregnancy. See also: Hyperemesis gravidarum Pregnancy care

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Morning sickness

Morning sickness is nausea that occurs during pregnancy. Morning sickness is a misnomer, however, since it can strike at any time of the day or night.

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Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy

Symptoms of nausea, vomiting and tiredness are common during early pregnancy. Around half of all pregnant women will experience both nausea and vomiting, and 28% of women will experience nausea without vomiting.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Morning sickness

Morning sickness is nausea (upset stomach) and vomiting (throwing up) that may happen during pregnancy. It happens most often in the morning, but it can happen any time of day. Morning sickness is most common during the first 12 to 14 weeks of pregnancy. Although morning sickness is unpleasant, it is usually harmless. The nausea and vomiting of morning sickness usually goes away by the second half of pregnancy.

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Morning sickness

The nausea and vomiting that affect some women during the first few months of pregnancy, particularly in the morning.

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Motion Sickness

Motion sickness (kinetosis) is the experience of unpleasant symptoms, predominantly nausea, during real or perceived motion. It is most commonly observed in boat travel (seasickness), although any type of travel or motion can induce motion sickness. Other examples of motion or travel sickness include car sickness and air sickness.

Morning sickness - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Morning sickness, also called nausea gravidarum, nausea, vomiting of pregnancy (emesis gravidarum or NVP), or pregnancy sickness is a condition that affects ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Managing morning sickness

Nov 28, 2008 ... For many women, the toughest part of early pregnancy is morning sickness. If you are suffering from nausea, vomiting, or both, you need safe ...

Read more on www.webmd.com

Morning Sickness -- familydoctor.org

Information for women about morning sickness during pregnancy.

Read more on familydoctor.org

ACOG Education Pamphlet AP126-- Morning Sickness

Morning sickness does not mean your baby is sick. It can become more of a problem if you cannot keep any foods or fluids down and begin to lose weight. ...

Read more on www.acog.org

Contents

Causes
The exact cause of morning sickness is unknown. It may be caused by hormone changes or lower blood sugar during early pregnancy. Emotional stress, fatigue, traveling, or some foods can make the problem worse. Nausea in pregnancy is more common and can be worse with twins or triplets.

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Complications
Typical cases of morning sickness don't pose risks for mother or baby. However, if you're underweight before pregnancy and morning sickness prevents you from gaining a healthy amount of weight during pregnancy, your baby may be born underweight. Rarely, frequent vomiting may lead to tears in the tube that connects the mouth to the stomach (esophagus).

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Considerations
Morning sickness is very common. Most pregnant women have at least some nausea, and about a third have vomiting. Morning sickness usually begins during the first month of pregnancy and continues through the 14th to 16th week (3rd or 4th month). Some women have nausea and vomiting through their entire pregnancy.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Diagnosis
Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) can usually be diagnosed on the basis of the symptoms alone.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Home Care
Try to keep a positive attitude. Remember that morning sickness usually stops after the first 3 or 4 months of pregnancy. To reduce nausea, try:A few soda crackers or dry toast when you first wake up, even before you get out of bed in the morning.; A small snack at bedtime and when getting up to go to the bathroom at night.; Avoid large meals; instead, snack as often as every 1 - 2 hours during the day and drink plenty of fluids.; Eat foods high in protein and complex carbohydrates, such as...

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Lifestyle and home remedies
To help relieve morning sickness: Choose foods carefully. Opt for foods that are high in carbohydrates, low in fat and easy to digest. Salty foods are sometimes helpful, as are foods that contain ginger such as ginger lollipops. Avoid greasy, spicy and fatty foods.; Snack often. Before getting out of bed in the morning, eat a few soda crackers or a piece of dry toast. Nibble throughout the day, rather than eating three larger meals. An empty stomach may aggravate nausea.; Drink plenty of fluids. Sip water or ginger ale. It may also help to suck on hard candy, ice chips or ice pops.; Pay attention to nausea triggers. Avoid foods or smells that seem to make your nausea worse.; Get plenty of...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Medical advice
Call your doctor if:Morning sickness does not improve, despite trying home remedies.; Nausea and vomiting continue beyond your 4th month of pregnancy. This happens to some women and is usually normal, but have it checked out.; You lose more than 2 pounds.; You vomit blood or material that looks like coffee grounds. (Call immediately.); You vomit more than 3 times per day or you cannot keep food or liquid down.

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Preparing for your appointment
Morning sickness can usually be addressed during routine prenatal appointments. Be prepared to answer questions about your nausea and vomiting, including what helps and what makes it worse.

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Prevention
There's no proven way to prevent morning sickness. Before conception, however, it may help to take prenatal vitamins. Several older studies suggest that women who take multivitamins at the time of conception and during early pregnancy are less likely to experience severe morning sickness. The folic acid in prenatal vitamins also helps prevent neural tube defects, such as spina bifida.

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Risk factors
Morning sickness can affect anyone who's pregnant. You might be more likely to experience morning sickness if: You experienced nausea or vomiting from motion sickness, migraines, certain smells or tastes, or exposure to estrogen (in birth control pills, for example) before pregnancy; You experienced morning sickness during a previous pregnancy; You're pregnant with twins or other multiples

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Symptoms
Although commonly called morning sickness, nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) can occur at any time during the day.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Treatment
There are a number of dietary and lifestyle changes that you can make which can help reduce the symptoms of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP). These changes are outlined below.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
What to Expect at Your Office Visit
Morning sickness is very common. Most pregnant women have at least some nausea, and about a third have vomiting. Morning sickness usually begins during the first month of pregnancy and continues through the 14th to 16th week (3rd or 4th month). Some women have nausea and vomiting through their entire pregnancy.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov