multiplemyeloma

What is Multiple myeloma?


High levels of calcium and paraproteins in your blood can damage your kidneys. In most cases, kidney damage is only temporary and the kidneys recover. However, in a small number of cases, the damage to the kidneys is so severe that the kidneys lose some, or all, of their function. This is known as kidney failure.

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Also known as plasmacytoma, myeloma - multiple, Plasma Cell Myeloma, myeloma, multiple, Plasma-Cell Myeloma, plasma cell dyscrasia, Multiple Myelomas
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Multiple myeloma information from trusted sources:

Multiple myeloma

Multiple myeloma is a cancer of plasma cells, which are located within the bone marrow. Plasma cells are a part of the immune system, which fights infections. In multiple myeloma, abnormal plasma cells (myelomas) interfere with the growth of other blood cells, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. These abnormal plasma cells make it harder for the body to fight infections. In addition, as the plasma cells grow, they crowd out normal cells, leading to complications such as anemia and hemostatic abnormalities.

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Plasma-cell myeloma

Multiple myeloma is a cancer that begins in plasma cells, a type of white blood cell. These cells are part of your immune system, which helps protect the body from germs and other harmful substances. In time, myeloma cells collect in the bone marrow and in the solid parts of bone. No one knows the exact causes of multiple myeloma, but it is more common in older people and African-Americans. Early symptoms may include Bone pain, often in the back or ribs Broken bones Weakness or fatigue Weight loss Repeated infections

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Multiple myeloma

Multiple myeloma is cancer of the plasma cells in bone marrow.

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Multiple myeloma

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Plasma cell myeloma

Multiple myeloma is an uncommon bone marrow cancer that affects plasma cells, which are the cells found in bone marrow.

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Multiple Births

If you are pregnant with more than one baby, you are far from alone. Multiple births are way up in the United States. Why More women are having babies after age 30 and more are taking fertility drugs. Both boost the chance of carrying more than one baby. A family history of twins also makes multiples more likely. Years ago, most twins came as a surprise. Now, most women know about a multiple pregnancy early. They should see their health care providers more often than women who are expecting one baby because multiple pregnancies need to be monitored more closely. Multiple pregnancy babies have a much higher risk of being born prematurely. Some women have to go on bed rest to delay labor. Finally, they may deliver by C-section, especially if there are three babies or more.

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Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the myelin sheath, the material that surrounds and protects your nerve cells. This damage slows down or blocks messages between your brain and your body, leading to the symptoms of MS. They can include No one knows what causes MS. It may be an autoimmune disease, which happens when your body attacks itself. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins between the ages of 20 and 40. Usually, the disease is mild, but some people lose the ability to write, speak or walk. There is no cure for MS, but medicines may slow it down and help control symptoms. Physical and occupational therapy may also help.

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Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) can be thought of as an inflammatory process involving different areas of the central nervous system (CNS) at various points in time. As the name suggests, multiple sclerosis affects many areas of the CNS.

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease that affects the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system).

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Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a potentially debilitating disease in which your body's immune system eats away at the protective sheath that covers your nerves. This interferes with the communication between your brain and the rest of your body. Ultimately, this may result in deterioration of the nerves themselves, a process that's not reversible.

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Contents

Alternative medicine
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Causes
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Coping and support
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Diagnosis
In diagnosing multiple myeloma, your GP will ask you about your recent medical history and your symptoms. It is then it is likely they will refer you for blood and urine tests.

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Exams and Tests
Blood tests can help diagnose this disease. They may include: Blood chemistry may show increased levels of calcium, total protein, and abnormal kidney function; Complete blood count (CBC) reveals low numbers of red and white blood cells and platelets; Serum beta 2 microglobulin level; Serum immunofixation electrophoresis; Urine immunofixation electrophoresis; Serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP); Urine protein electrophoresis (UPEP) or Bence-Jones protein analysis; Quantitative immunoglobulins (nephelometry); Serum free light chain measurements

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Lifestyle and home remedies
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Medical advice
Call your doctor if you have multiple myeloma and infection develops, or numbness, loss of movement, or loss of sensation develops.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
Survival of people with multiple myeloma depends on the patient's age and the stage of disease. Some cases are very aggressive, while others take years to get worse.

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Possible Complications
Kidney failure is a frequent complication. Other complications may include:Bone fractures; High levels of calcium in the blood, which can be very dangerous; Increased chances for infection (especially pneumonia); Paralysis from tumor or spinal cord compression

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Preparing for your appointment
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Risk factors
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Support Groups
The stress of illness may be eased by joining a support group whose members share common experiences and problems. See: Cancer - support group

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Symptoms
In many cases, multiple myeloma does not cause any symptoms when the condition is in its early stages, and it is only diagnosed by way of routine blood and urine tests.

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Treatments and drugs
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