peritonealdialysis

What is peritoneal dialysis?


Before you start peritoneal dialysis, you and your family will receive training on what the procedure involves and how to use the equipment. You will need an operation to insert the catheter the thin, soft plastic tube that carries the dialysis solution in and out of your abdomen. You may receive local or general anesthetics for the insertion procedure. Usually the surgeon places the tube near your bellybutton.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Search for any health
topic on HealthMash:

Explore and Discover

Alternative Medicine
» iron
» copper
» alfalfa

peritoneal dialysis information from trusted sources:

Peritoneal Dialysis

Peritoneal dialysis is a way to remove waste products from your blood when your kidneys can no longer do the job. During peritoneal dialysis, blood vessels in your abdominal lining (peritoneum) fill in for your kidneys, with the help of a fluid (dialysate) washed in and out of the peritoneal space.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Hemodialysis

When your kidneys are healthy, they clean your blood. They also make hormones that keep your bones strong and your blood healthy. When your kidneys fail, you need treatment to replace the work your kidneys used to do. Unless you have a kidney transplant, you will need a treatment called dialysis. There are two main types of dialysis: hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. Both types filter your blood to rid your body of harmful wastes, extra salt and water. Hemodialysis does that with a machine. Peritoneal dialysis uses the lining of your abdomen, called the peritoneal membrane, to filter your blood. Each type has both risks and benefits. They also require that you follow a special diet. Your doctor can help you decide the best type of dialysis for you.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Dialysis

As with haemodialysis, the first stage in peritoneal dialysis is to create an access point so that the dialysate fluid can be passed into, and then out of, your peritoneal cavity.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

DIANEAL LOW CALCIUM PERITONEAL DIALYSIS SOLUTION WITH DEXTROSE

DIANEAL Low Calcium peritoneal dialysis solutions in AMBU-FLEX containers are sterile, nonpyrogenic solutions for intraperitoneal administration only. They contain no bacteriostatic or antimicrobial agents or added buffers. DIANEAL Low Calcium peritoneal dialysis solutions are indicated for use in chronic renal failure patients being maintained on peritoneal dialysis.

Read more on dailymed.nlm.nih.gov

Liver Disease, Ascites

The organs of the abdomen are contained in a sac or membrane called the peritoneum. Normally the peritoneal cavity contains no fluid, although in women a small amount (20ml, or less than an ounce) can occasionally be found depending on the menstrual cycle. Ascites is the term used to denote a fluid collection in the peritoneal cavity, a situation that is not normal.

Peritonitis

Inflammation of the peritoneum, which is a serous sac that lines the abdominal cavity and most of the viscera contained therein.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com

Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Peritoneal Dialysis

Describes the procedures and supplies required for peritoneal dialysis (PD). Explains the differences between ambulatory and automated PD.

Read more on kidney.niddk.nih.gov

Peritoneal dialysis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a treatment for patients with severe chronic kidney disease. The process uses the patient's peritoneum in the abdomen as a ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Peritoneal dialysis

Sep 17, 2009 ... Peritoneal dialysis uses a membrane inside your body (peritoneal membrane) as a filter to clear wastes and extra fluid from your body and to ...

Read more on www.webmd.com

Understanding Your Peritoneal Dialysis Options

This 16-page brochure provides a explanation of peritoneal dialysis for those who may be approaching dialysis or current dialysis patients interested in ...

Read more on www.aakp.org

Contents

Results
Many factors affect how well peritoneal dialysis works in removing wastes and extra fluid from your blood. These factors include: Your size; How quickly your peritoneum filters waste (peritoneal transport rate); How much dialysis solution you use (fill volume); The number of daily exchanges; Dwell times; The concentration of sugar (dextrose) in the dialysis solution

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Risks
Most people who require dialysis face a variety of serious health problems, including diseases that cause kidney failure as well as kidney failure itself. Dialysis prolongs life for many people, but life expectancy for those who need the procedure is still much lower than that of the general population.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
What you can expect
In peritoneal dialysis, a sterile cleansing solution (dialysate) flows through the catheter into your abdomen. The solution stays in your belly for a prescribed period of time, known as the dwell time. The lining of your abdominal cavity (peritoneum) acts as a membrane that allows waste, chemicals and extra fluid to pass from your blood into the dialysis solution. The solution contains a sugar that draws wastes and extra fluid through the tiny blood vessels in your peritoneum into your abdomen. Your belly may feel fuller than usual while the dialysis solution is there, but it's generally not uncomfortable.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Why it's done
Peritoneal dialysis is often done to manage kidney failure until a kidney transplant is possible. Kidney failure itself usually results from a long-term (chronic) disease that causes kidney damage over a number of years. Common causes of kidney failure include: Diabetes; High blood pressure (hypertension); Kidney inflammation (glomerulonephritis); Blood vessel inflammation (vasculitis); Polycystic kidney disease (cysts in the kidney)

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com