pertussis

What is pertussis?


Pertussis, or whooping cough, is an upper respiratory infection caused by the Bordetella pertussis or Bordetella parapertussis bacteria. It is a serious disease that can cause permanent disability in infants, and even death.

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Whooping cough tests

To detect and diagnose a Bordetella pertussis infection

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Whooping Cough

Whooping cough is an infectious bacterial disease that causes uncontrollable coughing. The name comes from the noise you make when you take a breath after you cough. You may have choking spells or may cough so hard that you vomit. Anyone can get whooping cough, but it is more common in infants and children. It's especially dangerous in infants. The coughing spells can be so bad that it is hard for infants to eat, drink or breathe.

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Whooping Cough

Whooping cough, also sometimes referred to as pertussis, is an infection of the lining of the respiratory tract. The respiratory tract is the airway that carries air to and from the lungs.

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Pertussis

Pertussis is an infection of the nose, throat, and lungs. It is also called whooping cough. With pertussis, air passages narrow and get plugged with thick sputum (spit). This may cause you to have coughing spells. Pertussis is usually less serious in adults and most serious in babies and young children.

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Whooping Cough

Whooping cough known medically as pertussis is a highly contagious respiratory tract infection. Although it initially resembles an ordinary cold, whooping cough may eventually turn more serious, particularly in infants. In the more advanced stages, it's marked by a severe, hacking cough followed by a high-pitched intake of breath that sounds like "whoop."

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Diphtheria + Tetanus + Pertussis + Hepatitis B + Poliovirus

PEDIARIX [Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoids and Acellular Pertussis Adsorbed, Hepatitis B (Recombinant) and Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine Combined] is a noninfectious, sterile, multivalent vaccine for intramuscular administration manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals. It contains diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, 3 pertussis antigens (inactivated pertussis toxin [PT], filamentous hemagglutinin [FHA], and pertactin [69 kiloDalton outer membrane protein]), hepatitis B surface antigen,...

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Pertussis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pertussis, also known as whooping cough is a highly contagious bacterial disease caused by Bordetella pertussis. Symptoms are initially mild, ...

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CDC - Pertussis: Clinical

by E Agent - 2009

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Whooping Cough (Pertussis)

Provides general information, signs and symptoms, and treatments. Includes a guide as to when to call a doctor.

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Pediatric Pertussis: eMedicine Pediatrics: General Medicine

Apr 27, 2010 ... Overview: Pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough, is a respiratory tract infection characterized by a paroxysmal cough.

Read more on emedicine.medscape.com

Contents

Complications
As babies and young children are usually most severely affected by whooping cough, they are most likely to develop severe complications. In particular, complications tend to be most severe in babies who are under 12 months old and, occasionally, they can be fatal.

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Diagnosis
See your GP as soon as possible if you think that you or your child may have whooping cough. Your GP will need to inform local health authorities about any suspected cases of whooping cough.

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Exams and Tests
The initial diagnosis is usually based on the symptoms. However, when the symptoms are not obvious, pertussis may be difficult to diagnose. In very young infants, the symptoms may be caused by pneumonia instead.

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Medical advice
Call your health care provider if you or your child develops symptoms of pertussis.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
In older children, the outlook is generally very good. Infants have the highest risk of death, and need careful monitoring.

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Possible Complications
Pneumonia Convulsions Seizure disorder (permanent) Nose bleeds Ear infections Brain damage from lack of oxygen Bleeding in the brain (cerebral hemorrhage) Mental retardation Slowed or stopped breathing (apnea) Death

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Prevention
In the UK, whooping cough is now rare due to immunisation. However, it is still very important that babies and young children are immunised against whooping cough because it is still possible for the infection to occur.

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Symptoms
Runny nose Slight fever (102 °F or lower) Severe, repeated coughs that: Make breathing difficult Result in vomiting Produce a high-pitched "whooping" sound when a person takes a breath Cause a short loss of consciousness Diarrhea Choking spells in infants

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Treatment
Whooping cough can be treated using antibiotics. However, the way in which treatment is given varies between babies and young children, and adults.

Read more on www.nhs.uk