postpartumdepression

What is postpartum depression?


Left untreated, postpartum depression can interfere with mother-child bonding and cause family distress. Children of mothers who have untreated postpartum depression are more likely to have behavioral problems, such as sleeping and eating difficulties, temper tantrums and hyperactivity. Delays in language development are common as well.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
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Postpartum Depression

The birth of a baby can trigger a jumble of powerful emotions, from excitement and joy to fear and anxiety. But it can also result in something you might not expect depression.

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Postpartum Depression

You've just had a baby, one of the most important and happiest events in your life. "What could make a woman happier than a new baby" you wonder. So why are you so sad We don't know for sure, but you are not alone. As many as 80% of women experience some mood disturbances after pregnancy ("postpartum"). They feel upset, alone, afraid, or unloving toward their baby, and guilt for having these feelings. For most women, the symptoms are mild and go away on their own. But 10-20% of women develop a more disabling form of mood disorder called postpartum depression. The "baby blues" are a passing state of heightened emotions that occurs in about half of women who have recently given birth. This state peaks 3-5 days after delivery and lasts from several days to 2 weeks.

Baby Blues

Many new moms feel happy one minute and sad the next. If you feel better after a week or so, you probably just had the "baby blues." If it takes you longer to feel better, you may have postpartum depression. Postpartum depression can make you feel restless, anxious, fatigued and worthless. Some new moms worry they will hurt themselves or their babies. Unlike the "baby blues," postpartum depression does not go away quickly. Very rarely, new moms develop something even more serious. They may stop eating, have trouble sleeping and become frantic or paranoid. Women with this condition usually need to be hospitalized.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Postpartum Depression

Postpartum depression (dee-PRESH-un) is a type of mood disorder after giving birth. A mood is an emotion or a feeling that affects our behavior (how we act). Your mood also affects how you feel about yourself and life in general. Depression is a sad mood that you cannot control.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Post-natal depression

Having a baby is a life-changing experience. Pregnancy and the first year after the birth are periods that many parents find quite stressful. The birth of a baby is an emotional experience and, for many new mothers, feeling tearful and depressed is also common. However, sometimes longer periods of depression, known as postnatal depression (PND), can occur during the first few weeks and months of the baby's life. PND can have a variety of physical and emotional symptoms, and many women are unaware that they have the condition. It is therefore important for partners, family, friends and healthcare professionals to recognise the signs of PND as early as possible so that the appropriate treatment can be given. Following childbirth there are three different types of depression, which are outlined below.

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Depression

Mental depression is characterized by altered mood. There is loss of interest in all usually pleasurable outlets such as food, sex, work, friends, hobbies, or entertainment.

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Postpartum depression - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Postpartum depression (PPD), also called postnatal depression, is a form of clinical depression which can affect women, and less frequently men, ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Depression During and After Pregnancy | Frequently Asked Questions ...

Mar 6, 2009 ... Depression after childbirth is called postpartum depression. ... The symptoms of postpartum depression last longer and are more severe. ...

Read more on www.womenshealth.gov

Postpartum Depression: What Is It, and What Causes It?

Jun 24, 2008 ... WebMD explains what PPD (postpartum depression) is and what causes it. Learn the signs to look for and what increases your risk.

Read more on www.webmd.com

Postpartum Support International

Postpartum Support International is dedicated to helping women suffering from perinatal mood and anxiety disorders, including postpartum depression, ...

Read more on www.postpartum.net

Contents

Alternative medicine
Little research has been done on complementary and alternative therapies for postpartum depression. Although some data is available, it's not definitive.

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Causes
There's no single cause for postpartum depression. Physical, emotional and lifestyle factors may all play a role.

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Exams and Tests
There is no single test to diagnose postpartum depression. Your doctor may have you complete a questionnaire at your office visit to look for signs of depression or risks for depression.

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Lifestyle and home remedies
Postpartum depression isn't generally a condition that you can treat on your own but you can do some things for yourself that build on your treatment plan. In fact, taking good care of yourself can help speed your recovery.

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Medical advice
If you're feeling depressed after your baby's birth, you may be reluctant or embarrassed to admit it. But it's important to tell your doctor. If the signs and symptoms of depression don't fade after a few weeks or if they're so severe that they interfere with your ability to complete everyday tasks, call your doctor. Early intervention can speed your recovery.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
Medication and professional counseling are often successful in reducing or eliminating symptoms.

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Possible Complications
If left untreated, postpartum depression can last for months or years, and you may be at risk of harming yourself or your baby.

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Prevention
If you have a history of depression especially postpartum depression mention it to your doctor as soon as you find out you're pregnant. Your doctor will monitor you closely for signs and symptoms of depression. Sometimes mild depression can be managed with support groups, counseling or other therapies. In other cases, antidepressants are recommended even during pregnancy.

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Risk factors
Postpartum depression can develop after the birth of any child, not just the first. The risk increases if: You have a history of depression, either during pregnancy or at other times; You had postpartum depression after a previous pregnancy; You've experienced stressful events during the past year, including illness, job loss or pregnancy complications; You're experiencing marital conflict; You have a weak support system; The pregnancy is unplanned or unwanted

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Support Groups
Participating in support groups may be valuable, but should be combined with medication and formal psychotherapy.

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Symptoms
Signs and symptoms of depression after childbirth vary depending on the type of depression.

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Tests and diagnosis
To distinguish between a short-term case of the baby blues and a more severe form of depression, your doctor may ask you to complete a depression-screening questionnaire. Blood tests can help your doctor determine whether an underactive thyroid is contributing to your signs and symptoms.

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Treatments and drugs
Treatment and recovery time vary, depending on the severity of your depression and your individual needs.

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