premenstrualsyndrome

What is premenstrual syndrome?


Here's what's known about the effectiveness of some of the more common complementary products and remedies used to soothe the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome: Calcium. Consuming 1,200 milligrams (mg) of dietary and supplemental calcium daily, such as chewable calcium carbonate (Tums, Rolaids, others), may reduce the physical and psychological symptoms of PMS. Regular, long-term use of calcium carbonate also reduces your risk of osteoporosis.; Magnesium. Taking 400 mg of supplemental magnesium daily may help to reduce fluid retention, breast tenderness and bloating in women with premenstrual syndrome.; Vitamin B-6. A daily dose of 50 to 100 mg of vitamin B-6 may help some women with troublesome...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Also known as pms, Premenstrual Tension, Premenstrual Syndromes, Premenstrual Tensions
Search for any health
topic on HealthMash:

Explore and Discover

Alternative Medicine
» ginkgo

premenstrual syndrome information from trusted sources:

Premenstrual syndrome

Premenstrual syndrome (known as PMS) involves a variety of physical, mental, and behavioral symptoms tied to a womans menstrual cycle. By definition, symptoms occur during the days before a woman's period starts. They usually go away after the first day or two of flow. PMS is a complex health concern. Up to 80% of women experience some symptoms of PMS. Scientists cannot agree on its cause or the best way to treat PMS.

PMS

Premenstrual syndrome, or PMS, is a group of symptoms that start one to two weeks before your period. Most women have at least some symptoms of PMS, and the symptoms go away after their periods start. For some women, the symptoms are severe enough to interfere with their lives. They have a type of PMS called premenstrual dysphoric disorder, or PMDD. Common PMS symptoms include

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Premenstrual syndrome

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) has a wide variety of symptoms, including mood swings, tender breasts, food cravings, fatigue, irritability and depression. An estimated 3 of every 4 menstruating women experience some form of premenstrual syndrome. These problems tend to peak in your late 20s and early 30s.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Premenstrual syndrome

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is the name given to the set of physical, psychological and emotional symptoms that appear in the days leading up to a woman's monthly period. It's also known as premenstrual tension (PMT). Usually, the symptoms improve when the woman's period starts and disappear a few days afterwards.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Premenstrual syndrome

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) encompasses a wide range of physical, emotional, and behavioral problems that occur cyclically in association with menstrual periods.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Premenstrual syndrome

A syndrome that occurs several days prior to the onset of menstruation. Characterized by one or more of the following: irritability, emotional tension, anxiety, mood changes, esp., depression, headache, breast tenderness with or without swelling, water retention, which may be sufficient enough to cause edema (swelling). The symptoms subside close to the onset of menstruation.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com

Sarafem

SARAFEM (fluoxetine hydrochloride) is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) for oral administration, fluoxetine was initially developed and marketed as an antidepressant (Prozac, fluoxetine capsules, USP). It is designated (&plusmn,)-N-methyl-3-phenyl-3-[(α,α,α-trifluoro-p-tolyl)oxy]propylamine hydrochloride and has the empirical formula of C17H18F3NO&bull,HCl. Its molecular weight is 345.79. The structural formula is:Fluoxetine hydrochloride is a white to off&ndash,white crystalline solid with a solubility of 14 mg/mL in water. SARAFEM is indicated for the treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).

Read more on dailymed.nlm.nih.gov

Sarafem

SARAFEM is indicated for the treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).

Read more on www.druglib.com

Premenstrual syndrome - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) (also called PMT or premenstrual tension) is a collection of physical and emotional symptoms related to a woman's menstrual ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) | Frequently Asked Questions ...

May 18, 2010 ... Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a group of symptoms linked to the menstrual cycle that can affect menstruating women of any age.

Read more on www.womenshealth.gov

Contents

Causes
An exact cause of PMS has not been identified. However, it may be related to social, cultural, biological, and psychological factors.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Diagnosis
There is no test or procedure that can diagnose premenstrual syndrome (PMS), but if you are finding your symptoms difficult to deal with, you should see your GP.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Exams and Tests
There are no physical examination findings or lab tests specific to the diagnosis of PMS. It is important that a complete history, physical examination (including pelvic exam), and in some instances a psychiatric evaluation be conducted to rule out other potential causes for symptoms that may be attributed to PMS.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Lifestyle and home remedies
You can sometimes manage or reduce the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome by making changes in the way you eat, exercise and approach daily life. Try these approaches: Eat smaller, more frequent meals to reduce bloating and the sensation of fullness.; Limit salt and salty foods to reduce bloating and fluid retention.; Choose foods high in complex carbohydrates, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains.; Choose foods rich in calcium. If you can't tolerate dairy products or aren't getting adequate calcium in your diet, you may need a daily calcium supplement.; Take a daily multivitamin supplement.; Avoid caffeine and alcohol.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Medical advice
Call for an appointment with your health care provider if PMS does not go away with self-treatment measures, or if symptoms occur that are severe enough to limit your ability to function.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Outlook (Prognosis)
Most women who receive treatment for specific symptoms related to PMS have significant relief.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Possible Complications
PMS symptoms may become severe enough to prevent women from maintaining normal function.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Preparing for your appointment
You're likely to start by seeing your family doctor or primary care provider. However, in some cases when you call to set up an appointment you may be referred immediately to a doctor who specializes in conditions affecting the female reproductive tract (gynecologist).

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Prevention
Some of the lifestyles changes often recommended for the treatment of PMS may actually be useful in preventing symptoms from developing or getting worse.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Self-help
If your premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is not too severe, there are several things you can do that may help to ease your monthly symptoms. These self-help methods are detailed below.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Symptoms
A wide range of physical or emotional symptoms have been associated with PMS. By definition, symptoms are considered to be PMS-related if they occur during the second half of the menstrual cycle (14 days or more after the first day of the menstrual period) and are absent for about 7 days after a menstrual period ends (during the first half of the menstrual cycle).

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Treatment
A cure for premenstrual syndrome (PMS) does not currently exist, but the aim of treatment is to help you manage your symptoms so that they do not interfere with your daily life.

Read more on www.nhs.uk