prostatecancer

What is Prostate Cancer?


If you have erection problems, or have loss the ability to obtain an erection, you should contact your GP. It may be possible to treat you with a type of medicine known as phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5). PDE5s work by increasing the blood supply to your penis.

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Also known as cancer - prostate, cancer, prostate, Prostate Cancers, Prostatic Cancer, Prostatic Neoplasms, Cancer of the Prostate, Cancer of Prostate
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Prostate Cancer information from trusted sources:

Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF)

The Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) is the leading philanthropic organization funding and accelerating prostate cancer research globally.

Read more on www.pcf.org

CDC Features - Prostate Cancer

Aug 30, 2010 ... Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Ask your doctor about the potential benefits and harms of prostate cancer screening tests.

Read more on www.cdc.gov

Prostate cancer -- Genes and Disease -- NCBI Bookshelf

The second leading cause of cancer death in American men, prostate cancer will be diagnosed in an estimated 184500 American men in 1998 and will claim the ...

Read more on www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Prostate cancer: Treatments and drugs - MayoClinic.com

Your prostate cancer treatment options depend on several factors, such as how fast your cancer is growing, how much it has spread, your overall health, ...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

What is prostate cancer?

Jul 1, 2010 ... Most of the time, prostate cancer grows slowly. Autopsy studies show that many older men (and even younger men) who died of other diseases ...

Read more on www.cancer.org

Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is a very common problem as men age. It has been estimated that 234,460 men would be diagnosed with the disease in 2006. The prostate is a walnut-sized gland that produces a thick fluid that forms the major part of semen. It is located below the bladder, in front of the rectum, and surrounds the upper part of the urethra (the tube that delivers urine from the bladder to the tip of the penis). Under the influence of the male hormone testosterone, prostate cells sometimes become cancerous and undergo unregulated growth. These cancer cells may spread beyond the prostate gland and invade (metastasize to) other parts of the body.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Prostate Cancer Treatment | Latest Advances

Dec 30, 2009 ... “You have prostate cancer.” These are four words no man wants to hear. But according to the American Cancer Society an estimated 232090 men ...

Prostate cancer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Prostate cancer is a form of cancer that develops in the prostate, a gland in the male reproductive system. Most prostate cancers are slow growing; however, ...

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NIHSeniorHealth: Prostate Cancer - Table of contents

Oct 23, 2003 ... Prostate Cancer. Table of Contents. Prostate Cancer Defined · Causes and Risk Factors · Symptoms and Diagnosis · Treatments and Research ...

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Prostate Cancer

What causes the cells in the prostate to become cancerous is unknown.

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Contents

Alternative medicine
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Causes
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Coping and support
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Diagnosis
The main test for prostate cancer is the PSA (prostate-specific antigen) test, which looks for raised levels of PSA in the blood. Prostate cancer increases the production of PSA, so the test may be able to detect prostate cancer in its early stages.

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Exams and Tests
A rectal exam will often show an enlarged prostate with a hard, irregular surface.

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Medical advice
Subscribe to our Living with cancer newsletter to stay up to date on cancer topics.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
The outcome varies greatly. This is mainly because the disease is found in older men, who may have a variety of other diseases or conditions such as heart or respiratory disease, or disabilities. The outcome is also affected by the stage and grade of the disease when you are diagnosed.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Possible Complications
Impotence is a potential complication after prostate removal or radiation therapy. Recent improvements in surgical procedures have made this complication less common. Urinary incontinence is another possible complication. Medications can have side effects, including hot flashes and loss of sexual desire.

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Prevention
Subscribe to our Living with cancer newsletter to stay up to date on cancer topics.

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PSA screening
Routinely screening all men to check their PSA levels is a controversial subject in the international medical community.

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Risk factors
Subscribe to our Living with cancer newsletter to stay up to date on cancer topics.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Support Groups
You can ease the stress of illness by joining a support group whose members share common experiences and problems. See: Support group - prostate cancer

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Symptoms
Prostate cancer does not normally cause any symptoms until the cancer has grown large enough to put pressure on the urethra. This normally results in problems associated with urination.

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Treatment
The recommended treatment for your prostate cancer will be largely based on both your Gleason score, and what stage the cancer has progressed to. The stages of prostate cancer are explained below.

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