proteins

What is proteins?


Protein is in every living cell in the body. Our bodies need protein from the foods we eat to build and maintain bones, muscles and skin. We get proteins in our diet from meat, dairy products, nuts and certain grains and beans. Proteins from meat and other animal products are complete proteins. This means they supply all of the amino acids the body can't make on its own. Plant proteins are incomplete. You must combine them to get all of the amino acids your body needs. It is important to get enough dietary protein. You need to eat protein every day, because your body doesn't store it the way it stores fats or carbohydrates. The average person needs 50 to 65 grams of protein each day. This is the amount in four ounces of meat and a cup of cottage cheese.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Also known as Gene Proteins, Protein Gene Products
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proteins information from trusted sources:

Protein - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Proteins are biochemical compounds consisting of one or more polypeptides typically folded into a globular or fibrous form in a biologically functional way. ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Learning About Proteins

You probably know you need to eat protein, but what is it? Many foods contain protein, which kids need to grow properly and stay healthy.

Read more on kidshealth.org

Protein - What Should You Eat? - The Nutrition Source - Harvard ...

Animal protein and vegetable protein probably have the same effects on health. It's the protein package that's likely to make a difference.

Read more on www.hsph.harvard.edu

Healthy Protein Food Sources: Eggs, Milk, Cheese, Pork, and More

Sep 21, 2009 ... Protein can help you lose weight and keep your belly full. But it's important to eat the right kind. Find out which proteins are healthy ...

Read more on www.webmd.com

Proteins definition - Medical Dictionary definitions of popular ...

Mar 13, 2011 ... Proteins: Large molecules composed of one or more chains of amino acids in a specific order determined by the base sequence of nucleotides ...

Read more on www.medterms.com

Protein home

The Protein database is a collection of sequences from several sources, including translations from annotated coding regions in GenBank, RefSeq and TPA, ...

Read more on www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

The Structures of Life: Chapter 1: Proteins are the Body's Worker ...

You've probably heard that proteins are important nutrients that help you build muscles. But they are much more than that. Proteins are worker molecules ...

Plasma Protein Fraction

This product has been prepared from large pools of human plasma. Each 100 mL of Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) 5%, USP--Plasmanate contains 5 g selected plasma proteins buffered with sodium carbonate and stabilized with 0.004 M sodium caprylate and 0.004 M acetyltryptophan. The plasma proteins consist of approximately 88% normal human albumin, 12% alpha and beta globulins and not more than 1% gamma globulin as determined by electrophoresis.1 The concentration of these proteins is such that this solution is iso-oncotic with normal human plasma and is isotonic. The approximate concentrations of the significant electrolytes in Plasmanate are: sodium 145 mEq/L, potassium 0.25 mEq/L, and chloride 100 mEq/L. Plasmanate must be administered intravenously.

Read more on www.druglib.com

What are proteins and what do they do? - Genetics Home Reference

Mar 6, 2011 ... Proteins are large, complex molecules that play many critical roles in the body. They do most of the work in cells and are required for the ...

Read more on ghr.nlm.nih.gov

Protein: Moving Closer to Center Stage - What Should You Eat ...

by DJ Frenk - Related articles

Read more on scholar.google.com

Contents

Protein C
Protein C is a substance that prevents blood clotting. A blood test can be done to see how much of this protein you have in your blood.

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Protein S
Protein S is a substance that prevents blood clotting. A blood test can be done to see how much of this protein you have in your blood.

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Tau protein test
A tau protien test is used to help identify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fluid leaking from the skull. Your doctor may suggest it if you have recently suffered a skull fracture or had brain surgery.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Tau protein and Amyloid Beta 42 peptide
To help discriminate between Alzheimer's Disease and other forms of early-onset dementia

Read more on www.labtestsonline.org
Protein C and Protein S
To help evaluate a thrombotic episode, to determine whether you may have an inherited or acquired Protein C or Protein S deficiency

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Protein in diet
Proteins are complex organic compounds. The basic structure of protein is a chain of amino acids.

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Protein - urine
A protein urine test measures the amount of proteins, such as albumin, found in a urine sample. A blood test may also be done to measure the level of albumin. See: Serum albumin

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Protein C, Human
Protein C is a protein produced naturally in the body. It is used in patients with severe congenital protein C deficiency to prevent and treat venous thrombosis (harmful blood clots form in the blood vessels) and purpura fulminans (harmful blood clots form in the skin) .

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Protein ElectrophoresisImmunofixation Electrophoresis
To help diagnose and monitor multiple myeloma and a variety of other conditions that affect protein absorption, production, and loss as seen in severe organ disease and altered nutritional states

Read more on www.labtestsonline.org
Protein-losing enteropathy
Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein from the digestive tract or the inability of the digestive tract to absorb proteins.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Protein electrophoresis - urine
A urine protein electrophoresis is a test that estimates how much of certain proteins you have in your urine. See also: Immunoelectrophoresis - urine Immunofixation - urine

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov