psoriaticarthritis

What is psoriatic arthritis?


Several natural approaches have been shown to be helpful for some people with psoriatic arthritis. You may want to investigate: Vitamins and minerals. Several large, long-term studies have shown that a carotenoid called beta-cryptoxanthin and the mineral zinc may help prevent some forms of arthritis. Beta-cryptoxanthin, a substance found in fruits and vegetables, is converted in your body into retinol, an active form of vitamin A. Top sources include papaya, red bell peppers, oranges, corn and watermelon. Zinc-rich foods include liver, sesame and pumpkin seeds, yogurt and shrimp. In general, eating a diet high in fruits and, especially, cruciferous vegetables broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels...

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Also known as arthritis - psoriatic, arthritis, psoriatic, arthropathic psoriasis, Arthritic Psoriasis, Psoriasis Arthropathica
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psoriatic arthritis information from trusted sources:

Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic arthritis is a form of arthritis that affects some people who have psoriasis, a serious skin condition. Most people develop psoriasis first and are later diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis, but arthritis can sometimes develop before skin lesions appear.

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Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic arthritis is a specific condition in which a person has both psoriasis and arthritis. Psoriasis is a common condition. A person with psoriasis generally has patches of raised red skin with scales. The affected skin looks different depending on the type of psoriasis the individual has. Arthritis is joint inflammation. Psoriatic arthritis is an autoimmune disease, meaning that your cells and antibodies (part of your immune system) fight your own tissues. Rarely, a person can have psoriatic arthritis without having obvious psoriasis. Usually, the more severe the skin symptoms are, the greater the likelihood a person will have psoriatic arthritis. Severe psoriatic arthritis involving the finger joints. Psoriasis affects 2.5% of white people in North America. It is less common in African American and Native American people. Psoriatic arthritis affects 5-8% of people with psoriasis. A recent survey by the National Psoriasis Foundation indicated that approximately 1 million people in the United States have psoriatic arthritis. Many people who have psoriasis may not know that they have psoriatic arthritis. Males and females are equally likely to have psoriasis. For psoriatic arthritis, males are more likely to have the spondylitic form (in which the spine is affected), and females are more likely to have the rheumatoid form (in which many joints may be involved). Psoriatic arthritis usually develops in people aged 35-55 years. However, it can develop in people of almost any age.

Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic arthritis is an arthritis that is often associated with psoriasis of the skin.

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Reiter's syndrome

Reactive arthritis (also known as Reiter's syndrome) can cause a wide range of symptoms. The most common symptoms include:

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Arthritis

Rheumatism: A general term for acute and chronic conditions characterized by inflammation, soreness and stiffness of muscles, and pain in joints and associated structures. It includes arthritis (infectious, rheumatoid, gouty), arthritis due to rheumatic fever or trauma/ degenerative joint disease: neurogenic arthropathy, hydroarthrosis, myositis, bursitis, fibromyositis, and many other conditions. Arthritis: Inflammation of a joint, usually accompanied by pain, swelling and frequently, changes in structure. Other forms of arthritis include ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

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Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a non-contagious, lifelong skin problem with thickened red and often scaly skin. It is very likely to run in families (hereditary) and seems to be caused by errors in how the immune system works. Certain substances and situations (triggers) may cause psoriasis to flare or worsen. Triggers include injury to the skin, HIV/AIDS infection, certain drugs, emotional stress, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Psoriasis may also be triggered by infection with a type of bacteria called Streptococcus.

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Psoriatic arthritis - MayoClinic.com

by H Archives - Related articles

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Psoriatic Arthritis Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment ...

Mar 11, 2011 ... Psoriatic arthritis can also cause inflammation of the spine ... In rare instances, psoriatic arthritis involves the small joints at the ...

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Psoriatic arthritis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Psoriatic arthritis (also arthritis psoriatica, arthropathic psoriasis or psoriatic arthropathy) is a type of inflammatory arthritis :427-436 :194 that, ...

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National Psoriasis Foundation - Psoriatic Arthritis | Arthritis ...

Learn about Psoriatic Arthritis Treatment options and how to manage Psoriatic Arthritis Pain through various medications and treatments.

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Contents

Causes
Psoriasis is a skin condition marked by a rapid buildup of rough, dry, dead skin cells that form thick scales. Arthritis causes pain and stiffness in your joints. Both are autoimmune problems disorders that occur when your body's immune system, which normally fights harmful organisms such as viruses and bacteria, begins to attack healthy cells and tissue. The abnormal immune response causes inflammation in your joints as well as the overproduction of skin cells.

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Complications
Psoriatic arthritis can be painful and debilitating, and can damage your joints, even with treatment. Some types of psoriatic arthritis can cause additional difficulties, including: Swollen fingers and toes (dactylitis). Psoriatic arthritis can cause a painful, sausage-like swelling of your fingers and toes. Swollen toes are a particular problem because they can make it hard to find shoes that fit properly. A podiatrist a doctor who specializes in the feet may be able to provide help if you have psoriatic arthritis in your toes or ankles. You may also develop swelling in your hands and feet that isn't limited to your joints and that may develop before joint symptoms do. Foot pain. Another...

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Coping and support
Psoriatic arthritis can be particularly discouraging because the emotional pain that psoriasis can cause is compounded by joint pain and, in some cases, disability. If you're struggling to cope, consider trying to: Learn as much as you can about psoriatic arthritis. Find out how the disease progresses, your prognosis and your treatment options, including the newest information on diet and exercise. The more you learn, the more active you can be in your own care. Learn to manage stress. The chemicals your body releases when you're under stress can help you deal with demanding situations. But there's a downside. Those same chemicals can suppress your immune system and aggravate both psoriasis...

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Exams and Tests
During a physical examination, the health care provider will look for:Joint swelling; Skin sores; Tenderness

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Lifestyle and home remedies
Some of the most encouraging news about psoriatic arthritis is that you can do a great deal on your own to help manage the condition. What's more, these measures provide relief without causing side effects: Maintain a healthy weight. Maintaining a healthy weight places less strain on your joints, leading to reduced pain and increased energy and mobility. The best way to increase nutrients while limiting calories is to eat more plant-based foods fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Exercise regularly. Exercise is beneficial for everyone including for people with arthritis. In fact, exercise alone can help relieve many of the symptoms of arthritic conditions, including pain and fatigue. You're...

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Medical advice
Call for an appointment with your health care provider if arthritis symptoms develop along with psoriasis.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
The course of the disease is often mild and affects only a few joints. A few people will have severe psoriatic arthritis in their hands, feet, and spine that causes deformities. In those with severe arthritis, treatment can still be successful in relieving the pain.

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Possible Complications
Repeated episodes may occur.

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Preparing for your appointment
Most often, you develop skin problems before signs of arthritis appear, but it's possible for arthritis to develop first or for both problems to be diagnosed at the same time. If you have psoriasis, your doctor will examine you carefully for joint problems, and vice versa.

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Prevention
There is no known prevention.

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Risk factors
Several factors can increase your risk of psoriatic arthritis, including: Psoriasis. Having psoriasis is the single greatest risk factor for psoriatic arthritis. People who have psoriasis lesions on their nails are especially likely to develop psoriatic arthritis. Your family history. Many people with psoriatic arthritis have a close relative with the disease. Your age. Although anyone can develop psoriatic arthritis, it occurs most often in adults between the ages of 30 and 50. Your sex. In general, psoriatic arthritis affects men and women equally, but DIP arthritis and spondylitis are more likely to affect men, whereas symmetric arthritis occurs more often in women.

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Symptoms
Both psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis are chronic diseases that get worse over time, but you may have periods when your symptoms improve or go into remission alternating with times when symptoms become worse. Often, skin and joint problems appear and disappear at the same time.

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Tests and diagnosis
No single test can confirm a diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. Your doctor will assess your signs and symptoms and work to rule out other causes of joint pain, such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Tests that help to distinguish psoriatic arthritis from other conditions include: X-rays. These can help pinpoint changes in the joints that occur in psoriatic arthritis but not in other arthritic conditions. Joint fluid test. In this test, your doctor removes a small sample of fluid from one of your joints often the knee for analysis in a laboratory. Uric acid crystals in your joint fluid may indicate that you have gout, rather than psoriatic arthritis. Sed rate. This blood test checks...

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Treatments and drugs
No cure exists for psoriatic arthritis, so treatment focuses on controlling inflammation in your affected joints to prevent joint pain and disability. Often, a multidisciplinary approach is used to treat both skin and joint symptoms.

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